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Net+ Vs CCNA

Discussion in 'Network+' started by Johnny_K, Oct 26, 2007.

  1. Johnny_K

    Johnny_K Bit Poster

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    Ok, heres the thing.

    I've heard alot of guys saying that you have to study for the Net+ if you dont know anything about the network world. Then start off by rolling to the CCNA.
    Others said: " dont bother with Net+, it'll waste your time, head to the CCNA it'll teach you what the Net+ will cover & more".


    PS: I'm talking about an individuals whos a beginner/intermediate in the network world. Not completely from scratch.


    Comments...
     
  2. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    if you don't know about networking then the N+ should be done first as the CCNA is far above it.

    Say a child has just learned his times table, your not gonna put him in a maths dergree are you?
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
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  3. Johnny_K

    Johnny_K Bit Poster

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    When you say "don't know about networking" you meant Zero knowledge ? or what exactly ?
    for example, i'm not that good in Networks but I understand Client/Server terminilogy, know most of the MCSE commands, and so far in my CCNA studies I found everything a piece of cake.
     
  4. wagnerk
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    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Beginners as well as people that have some knowledge, imo, should take the Network+.

    I don't know about the CCNA (I've studied some of the material, but not all - hence not certified with Cisco), however with Microsoft's 70-291 (their networking exam) I have found that beginners as well as people that already work in IT struggle with alot of the concepts and theory behind it. Those that have done the Network+, while they still find it difficult they can grasp the material alot more easier.

    -ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
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  5. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    If you are trying to decide where to start your educational process, thumb through the Sybex Network+ study guide and then the Cisco Press material for the CCNA and see how familiar you are with the content of each. That should help you get a perspective. You also might want to visit CompTIA.org and Cisco.com and take a look at their official domains for the exams in question. We can't tell you what you know...only you can tell you what you know.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  6. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    I agree with what's been said. Also CCNA is not vendor neutral, it's content is based on cisco routers and switches. You probably will learn most of the net+ stuff from CCNA, but it's not exactly the same. Also if you have no experience working with cisoc equipment it's a good idea to do so before doing the exam.
     
    Certifications: A+ | CCA | CCAA | Network+ | MCDST | MCSA | MCP (270, 271, 272, 290, 291) | MCTS (70-662, 70-663) | MCITP:EMA | VCA-DCV/Cloud/WM | VTSP | VCP5-DT | VCP5-DCV
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  7. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    I'm gonna be even more to-the-point with my advice... if you haven't touched a real Cisco router in a workplace environment before, you really shouldn't be pursuing the CCNA. Just my opinion, based on what I've seen in the real world for years. And even if you have... you should pursue the Network+ before the CCNA, even if you're a self-proclaimed "pro" at networking. Why? Well, if you already know the Network+ stuff, then it won't take long to study, and you'll have a nice certificate to show for your studies. And if you find you DON'T already know the Network+ stuff, then there's even MORE reason to study it. Either way, you can't go wrong by studying it.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
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  8. VantageIsle

    VantageIsle Kilobyte Poster

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    I am currently studying the Net+ stuff at the moment (actually I should pull my finger out and book my exam because I think I am about ready) but just last week I attended a week long cisco ICND course and I must say it was very heavy going.

    Network+ is based on a wide range of foundation networking theory and topics and has been a great help with my understanding of what is going on behind the scenes in the networks we use everyday.

    The Cisco Intro covers the OSI model in much greater depth with extra emphasis on the Cisco protocols and basic hands on with routers and switches.
    I found the ICND course very hard going but kept up (just) there is a lot of protocols to understand and you have to know your subnetting and wildcard masks. The subject I found the hardest to get my head round was access lists. One good thing is the cisco IOS commend line is very intuitive and easy to pick up.

    My advice, you must know your network+ stuff fairly well before you attempt the CCNA. This way you will not stuggle as much when working out how the cisco protocols work and when to use/troubleshoot them.

    Just my two-peneth worth:biggrin
     
    Certifications: A+, ITIL V3, MCSA, MCITP:EST, CCENT, 70-432-SQL, 70-401 SCCM
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  9. mrlogic0

    mrlogic0 Bit Poster

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    I recently started studying for the CCNA, however, I have been using Network+ study to give me a background (primer) in networking. It has helped me tremendously.

    I would like to take the net+ exam but I am instead thinking of doing the new 2-exam CCNA route (ICND1 & ICND2). These 2 exams will cost me approx £200 in total and will give me the new CCENT qualification and then the CCNA. The Net+ costs nearly £200 on its own! CompTIA R*POFF!!!
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons) Engineering - IT; Wireless#
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  10. onoski

    onoski Terabyte Poster

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    The Comptia exams are exceptionally expensive and especially when you're paying in £££:biggrin
     
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  11. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    The typical Network+ candidate is usually at a different point in his/her career than the typical CCENT/CCNA candidate. Network+ is more for those at the start of their career... the CCENT and CCNA are for those who are a bit more advanced in their career. Thus, although CompTIA exams are priced high, they're not a ripoff... consider them an investment in your early IT career.

    Nobody forces you to get certified... so if you don't want them, don't get them. But certifications can certainly give you an advantage, and particularly more so at the beginning of your career.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
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  12. Neil

    Neil Byte Poster

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    Well that seems to be very true, cuz I just did the conversion and I'll be paying £122 for my N+ exam! :biggrin The best thing I love about CompTIA's exams is that they're vendor-neutral.

    But since this topic is about "advanced" networking then the question everyone should be asking is: which vendor based exam is better, Cisco or Microsoft? Almost everyone uses Microsoft, but many people say that Cisco stuff is better. So exam-wise, which one is better to pursue?

    PS: I'd personally pick Microsoft since the A+ & N+ count as an elective, and since Windows is popular. But what are your views?
     
    Certifications: CompTIA A+ & Network+
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  13. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    They're different tools to be used in different situations. Everyone uses Microsoft... for operating systems, not for networking devices. Cisco is used for networking devices, such as routers and switches. I haven't seen a single organization use a Microsoft server as a router.

    Therefore... to support operating systems, get Microsoft certifications, and to support a network infrastructure, get Cisco certifications. BOTH are useful.
     
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  14. Neil

    Neil Byte Poster

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    Yea I understand that. Cisco is hardware (routers & switches) and Microsoft is software (operating systems), but the question I'm trying to ask (forgive me if my wording was bad) is "demand-wise". Obviously anyone would choose the one that's in higher demand, but since (like you said) BOTH are useful, which one is MORE in demand? This is kinda like software vs hardware -- we NEED both, but yet one has to be more dominant on the market. Those are the only 2 competing vendors in advanced exams. So which is more dominant?

    I personally think that its Microsoft, since the 2 popular (& valuable) vendor-neutral exams: A+ and Net+ earns you an elective in Microsoft. And from what I've been seeing around here, most people in the forums have more Microsoft certs than Cisco.
     
    Certifications: CompTIA A+ & Network+
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  15. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    BOTH. They're both in demand. They're not "competing vendors"... they're totally different. Get one, the other, or both... but only once you've gotten some real-world (not lab, not school) experience with them. Certification isn't for indicating a technology that you WANT to work with... it's for indicating that you ALREADY have experience with the technology.

    This isn't like the difference between programming and networking, where you are either a programmer OR an administrator, and rarely the two shall meet... these are BOTH jobs that a network administrator will deal with... administration of Windows-based OSes, and administration of Cisco devices.

    Put it this way... if you ONLY get one OR the other, you'll limit your opportunities for advancement in IT as far as network administration is concerned.

    Most of us here have Microsoft certifications because EVERY company uses Microsoft at some point in their organization. Thus, jobs related to Microsoft are many... but there are also a large number of qualified administrators to fill those positions. On the other hand, not EVERY company uses Cisco. Many do, but not all. There are fewer qualified administrators, but there are also fewer positions that relate JUST to Cisco. The overwhelming number of network administrator jobs require that you deal with BOTH Microsoft AND Cisco, not just one OR the other.

    Hope this helps. :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
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  16. Neil

    Neil Byte Poster

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    Yep it sure helps! :biggrin Thanks.

    Well I have practical on the job experience using Win2003 server, and I already plan to go down the road leading to MCSA. But you see, in my country, EVERYONE uses Microsoft. And having Microsoft certs will definitely get you a very comfortable IT position or even an IT Manager position! You live in the US and you mentioned that most of the companies there use Cisco. Well the only places you would find Cisco devices in my country are in large companies and corporations -- which are not very much -- and they would only hire a cisco tech if he has a *minimum* of 3 years experience! VERY tough for cisco in my country. How do they expect you to get experience when they don't want to give you a break? But that's just how those large places operate. But I acknowledge that its in high demand in North America & Europe.

    So considering my situation, Microsoft will be the way to go for me. When I get a break in North America, then I'll pursue Cisco. 8)
     
    Certifications: CompTIA A+ & Network+
    WIP: MCSA: 70-270
  17. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    It's interesting to see that all companies in SA use Microsoft... much like the rest of the world! Didn't know that there wasn't much Cisco usage in SA - interesting to know!

    Companies in North America won't hire a Cisco tech without many years of experience as well. I'd not hire a Cisco tech without 3 years of experience... so expect that here as well. I suspect the same is true for Europe.

    How do you get that experience? Work your way up. One doesn't start out working on routers... you have to learn first, starting with the basics. By learning, I don't mean "collect a bunch of book knowledge and take a bunch of tests"... I mean, learn by seeing how this stuff works in a real-world business network. It's SO much different than a lab environment where very little goes wrong. One step at a time... and you'll get there, eventually, I promise you. :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
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  18. Neil

    Neil Byte Poster

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    Thanks. Well I'm personally speaking bout my country Guyana (the only English speaking country in SA). I guess those other "big" countries like Venezuela, Brazil, Argentina, etc uses alot of Cisco. In my country the population is way under 1 million and prices are getting higher everyday! So you can imagine that everyone only looks for the easiest and cheapest way out. The philosophy for "most" people here is that "As long as it can get the job done, then nothing else really matters." So that's why I mentioned earlier that you'll only get cisco in larger companies -- those who deal in WANs like banks, international & export companies, utility companies, some government ministries, etc.

    Other major successful businesses just "make do" with what's available without going into extra expense for cisco equipment and qualified personnel, because their business is already successful without them. So why bother to get them now? That's the economical approach and that's basically how the system runs here. To be honest, 90% of the qualified persons get underpaid here.

    Young people come out with university degrees and can't get jobs because they have no experience in the field (except for the engineering, medical and education fields). Our university certs now count as nothing because businesses just got a little civilized and are now asking for international certs. Business students now apt for the British ACCA -- CAT is no longer enough. And when they do get ACCA, they have no experience so they don't get the job either. But regardless of the field, the salary is not worth the certs they ask for. And that's the reason why such a large land has such a low population. All of our qualified people got better offers in the Caribbean islands, the US, Canada and England. The majority of Guyanese can be found in the various cities in New York. This is all sad, but true. :cry:

    Right now I'm just using the time that I have to study, get certified, work and get hands-on exp in the process. Later when I've attained all the certs I want, I will leave and work overseas myself (not permanently) and when I've accumulated enough resources, I will return and set up my own small business here (IT related ofcourse! :biggrin).
     
    Certifications: CompTIA A+ & Network+
    WIP: MCSA: 70-270
  19. BosonMichael
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    Keep us posted! :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
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  20. Neil

    Neil Byte Poster

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    Sure will! :D
     
    Certifications: CompTIA A+ & Network+
    WIP: MCSA: 70-270

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