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Need some advice

Discussion in 'Training & Development' started by uperkurk, Nov 15, 2009.

  1. uperkurk

    uperkurk New Member

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    Hey guys, I really want a career in the IT field but I just have no clue where to start. I'm 20 years old now and I need to do something fast. I have been searching for apprenticeships and free courses ect but nobody is getting back to me. My ideal role would be to become a network administrator but I know thats awhile down the line and im in no rush to get there atm. But I would like some kind of junior networking/engineering role but all the jobs require knowledge that I just dont have. I have no certs and no formal IT qualifications and I dont really have time to go on a 3 year long college course.

    I have been thinking of just self studying and then taking all the exams ect but I dont know what my first step should be. I'm guessing my first job could be helpdesk but that doesnt really intrest me much I would like to go to peoples work stations and fix there problems. I recently considered doing to CCNA course at college but alot of people told me that wont get me a job because thats all you know. Any employer would want you to know more then just CCNA alone. I dont have thousands of pounds to spend on courses and a full time college course isnt practical either because then I cant work....

    I live in London so anyone that knows some great colleges that provide the sort of IT training that can lead to the networking side of IT like Cisco certs ect please let me know.

    Also for people that was in my situation what did you do to get your first IT job and what job what it?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 15, 2009
  2. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    You should look at A+,N+ and MCDST you do not have to do courses as you can get the books yourself and take the exams when you are ready.

    Unfortunately not many people walk into a networking job straight off, you usually have to progress from a support role.

    As for the CCNA, it is a high level cert that is supposed to show your job experience with CISCO gear not that you can pass an exam. So having this cert without experience could go against you although after doing the N+ you could do CCENT which is like a lower level equivelant

    If you do decide to self study (quite a lot of people do it on here) then you will save yourself a lot of money and if you need help you can ask on here for that help.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  3. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Self study, CompTIA's A+ then Network+ then Microsoft's MCDST (Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician)

    These are all good entry level certifications that will give you a solid foundation on which to build your future knowledge.

    They will also help you stand out from the crowd a little, as they are 'entry level' certs that employers looking for people without real world experience, should be looking for.

    Try to avoid qualifications like the CCNA for now, as they are not entry level certs, they are advanced certs and if you brag on your CV about holding them without the relevant experience, that can damage your chances of being selected.

    Advanced certifications are supposed to map to your real world experience, they are not a short cut to a highly paid networking job. There are no shortcuts.
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  4. onoski

    onoski Terabyte Poster

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    Hi and welcome to CF:) well not sure by what you mean as to not having time to attend a three year course. Well must good things in life takes time to be realised and achieved.

    Well what GBL, stated would be the suitable route for you then and with hard work and determination you'd be your dream role in time. Best wishes:)
     
    Certifications: MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003 Messaging, MCP, HNC BIT, ITIL Fdn V3, SDI Fdn, VCP 4 & VCP 5
    WIP: MCTS:70-236, PowerShell
  5. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    hi,

    welcome to the forum.

    firstly, you have age on your side! Many people (including myself) started learning something new, later than others who have always worked in the same field and have experience on their side, even in cases of "parrot fashion learning".

    My advise would be to find a job and then look in to the entry level certs suggested. when you are working you will find the certification more logical, job relative and look at it as a way of securing employment, furthering your career and salary.

    Too many people see certifications and the assoicated salary and think of it like a choosing a meal in a restaurant. My advice to you is look for work (unpaid if you can afford to whilst looking for paid work), see if you like it and where your options are.

    Good luck!
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  6. uperkurk

    uperkurk New Member

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    Thanks for all your comments and after speaking to a good friend I have decided to go on a 9 month college course and once I complete that I can then go onto a 2 year long course which leads to a degree.

    First one is BTEC FIRST DIPLOMA IT PRACTITIONERS (BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS)

    Second one is BTEC NATIONAL DIPLOMA IN IT PRACTITIONERS (DEGREE +)

    I belive that this is the only real way im going to get a "career" rather then just a job. I know I said college isnt practical but I can get allowances to help me, sometimes in life you have to go without in the short run to get somewhere in the long run, now its my time lol.

    And the best part about doing theses courses is I will have plenty of time to self study for the comptia A+ Network+ ect. My friend told me the first course is very easy and involves no course work to do at home thus giving me time to study for them certs. Hopefully if all goes to plan in about 3 years i'll have a degree and afew other certs to get in the door rather then just my foot lol.

    I know employers would much rather employ someone with a degree then just afew certs like you all said.
     
  7. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    All good advice given above! :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  8. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    No we didn't say that at all :rolleyes:

    A degree is a nice thing to have but it is not what employers are looking for, for entry level jobs. You may find that further along in your career, a degree might open a door that would otherwise be closed or maybe not. What matters is your experience and how well you apply yourself to any job role.

    The cert vs degree debate has been going on forever and the truth is, it depends :)
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  9. RonDon11

    RonDon11 New Member

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    Get A+ certified and get a basic job to gain experience. You just need to score -A- job, and put some time under your belt while you pursue bigger certs. Don't rot in college for 4 years. By the time you get done half of the technology you worked with will be obsolete.
     
  10. uperkurk

    uperkurk New Member

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    Yeh I understand where your coming from in that sense but all the "entry level" jobs ive seen like helpdesk ones they want knowledge of active directory, printers, windows servers and what not and I have no clue about this.
     
  11. Jiser

    Jiser Kilobyte Poster

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    I am not in your situation, I went for the traditional route of A-Levels (also studied for ccna at school), then to sandwich degree, which has a year out in industry in the third year. Then everything so far has come off that, so I got an i.t. tech job responsible for two schools in my final year also.

    If you decide to go degree route, sooner rather than later due to tuition fees rising, unless your a scot and get it all free. Also choose a degree with a year out in industry for obvious reasons.

    You do need something though, I think personally a good mix of Academic and Industry qualifications is always good. All I can say is a my degree opened the door for me.

    Have you thought about the forces? Who offer excellent development opportunities for someone like yourself and you can work in I.T.. Also public institutions such as the NHS always have entry jobs going. Check around on council websites.

    Also a word of warning I saw on news recently that they (government i think) are pretty much cutting most of the funding for apprenticeships
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), PGc, MCTS:Win 7, MCSA W7/MCITP EDST, ITIL Foundation, Prince 2 Foundation, C&G: Web Design, MOS 07: Excel, Word, Powerpoint, Outlook.
  12. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    No company in their right mind is gonna hire someone without experience (meaning, entry level) to do AD administration on servers.

    Perhaps the jobs that you think are entry level are not entry level.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  13. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    I agree with Michael, and even those you say they have all the experience in the world get jobs and don't always last... it's a matter of getting your foot in the door, meaning taking jobs like help desk to get you started off and working your way up... there's hardly any shortcuts in this field.
     
    Certifications: A+ | CCA | CCAA | Network+ | MCDST | MCSA | MCP (270, 271, 272, 290, 291) | MCTS (70-662, 70-663) | MCITP:EMA | VCA-DCV/Cloud/WM | VTSP | VCP5-DT | VCP5-DCV
    WIP: VCAP5-DCA/DCD | EMCCA
  14. nugget
    Honorary Member

    nugget Junior toady

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    Well, a job is the start of a career. It just depends on what you do with it.
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP (270,271,272,290,620) | MCDST | MCTS:Vista
    WIP: MCSA, 70-622,680,685
  15. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    you will learn this when/if you do the A+, N+ and MCDST.

    A degree isn't the be all and end all of getting a job/career. There are plenty of people who get good degrees who never get into the career they want and some stay unemployed for a long time because they set their sites too high.

    Any employer worth their salt is going to hire someone with experience and any employer worth their salt is going to hire someone for entry level positions who is activley studying (certifications) whilst looking for work.

    You could always do a degree part time after getting some certs and an entry level job, if I had had my time around again this exactly how I would have done it.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  16. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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    I like the way you have written off the entire academic system as useless there. :) It's sounds to me that uperkurk has a good plan at the moment and I hope it goes well for him.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCP, MCDST, MCSA 2K3, MCTS, MOS, MTA, MCT, MCITP:EDST7, MCSA W7, Citrix CCA, ITIL Foundation
    WIP: Nada

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