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NASA fingers crossed with Galileo to crash into Jupiter

Discussion in 'The Lounge - Off Topic' started by tripwire45, Sep 21, 2003.

  1. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    It's not exactly "industry news", but I've found articles on the space program interesting pretty much ever since I could read (the first ones I could read involved a program called "Gemini" if any of you out there are old enough to remember it). Anyway, here's the link:

    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/afp/20030920/sc_afp/us_space_galileo_030920180541
     
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  2. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    ER, they'll probably realise that when it smashes to pieces on one.

    Thanks Trip, interesting reading.

    Keep us informed as to what the probe finds :thumbleft
     
  3. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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  4. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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  5. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Trip - you have a clear fondness for ol' Galileo, so let me be the first to offer my sympathies, as it found it's own burial place earlier this afternoon.

    14 years of sterling service I believe.

    The thing I found interesting, and in a way touching, was that it's greatest discovery in all that time was the ocean under the ice on Europa, which was coincidentally the moon where Galileo was to crash into at end of mission. So the NASA guys reprogrammed it to hiy Jupiter instead, so as not to contaminate the ocean with "human contact"

    Maybe just me, but I thought that was a special touch ....
     
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  6. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Here's the story of Galileo's demise:

    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tm...6&u=/ap/20030921/ap_on_sc/galileo_s_end_2

    It's not so much that I'm attached to Galileo specifically, but the NASA space program and I sort of grew up together. Galileo is 14 years old. When it was launched, my daughter was one and my sons were three. When Sputnik was launched, I was four. Galileo was in space virtually all of my children's lives. I imagine there are space craft that have been in space for as long as some of you have been around. Hmmm...let's see:

    http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/
     
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  7. Phil
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    Phil Gigabyte Poster

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    I had a great aunt born in the 1890's who refused to ever beleive man had walked on the moon, us kids used to laugh at her, how could she not beleive her own eyes, it had been on the telly and everything........ wise old bird as it turns out :)
     
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  8. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    I heard a story...supposedly true...about a group of high school students on a trip to the Smithsonian. They were visiting the Apollo exhibit and some were heard to ask if people ever really visited the moon and, if so, when. I was in high school myself when I watched the now famous live broadcast from the moon and heard Neil Armstrong say: "Here's one small step for man...one giant leap for mankind". Actually, there was a burst of static that obliterated the last part of his sentence, but it was later published in complete text for all the world.

    Boy, I'm old...but I still believe man walked on the moon.
     
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