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My Network+ Journal - All help will be greatley appereciated!

Discussion in 'Network+' started by oush, May 11, 2006.

  1. oush

    oush Byte Poster

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    Hi,
    I decided to make this journal as i thought it would be annoying if i made 10 threads a day asking lots of questions. Ive just started reading Network+ Study Guide By David Groth Exam N10-002.

    Im 17 years old so expect some very basic or perhaps "n00b" questions please dont flame. I started reading the first chapter today and i understood everything perfectly apart from the last 10-15 odd pages where it goes on about different types of cables and also i didnt understand the bit about RF (Wireless). Has anyone got any websites which will help me understand does 2 topics? Thank you! :biggrin :biggrin :biggrin :biggrin :biggrin
     
    Certifications: MCITP: EA, Linux+, CCNA, CCDA
    WIP: CCIP
  2. zimbo
    Honorary Member

    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    just a word of advice.. you reading an old book.. the exam was updated and its now N10-003.

    Look at these:
    Network+ All in one
    Sybex Network+
     
    Certifications: B.Sc, MCDST & MCSA
    WIP: M.Sc - Computer Forensics
  3. oush

    oush Byte Poster

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    Thanks!
    But is the difference that much? Can i use my current book untill i know the basic fundamentals of networking (Read the first 6 chapters or so) then purchase the new book?
     
    Certifications: MCITP: EA, Linux+, CCNA, CCDA
    WIP: CCIP
  4. oush

    oush Byte Poster

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    Why are they considerd a Peer-To-Peer network? Whats so special about does operating systems?

    Thanks!
     
    Certifications: MCITP: EA, Linux+, CCNA, CCDA
    WIP: CCIP
  5. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    And that is a perfect example of why your book is out of date. While the exam will include Win9x and NT it will expect you to have some clue about Win2k and XP as well.

    To answer your question - Windows networking is divided up into 'domain' and 'workgroup' types. Only server OSes can run a domain. In a workgroup you are effectively peer-to-peer - there is no machine really in overall control.

    I suspect in the old books only NT server will be given as running a domain.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  6. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Just to add a little..

    A domain is a security boundry. A server product like Windows NT4 Server, Windows 2000 Server or Server 2003 can be configured as a Domain Controller. This box then has power over the domain. In a domain all computer and user accounts are stored on the domain controller. Users log onto the domain controller from their workstations, then they are given an access token which gives them the rights, dependant on which groups the users belongs to, for specific resources (shares, printers etc) in the domain. So you can administrate your domain from one central location.

    Peer to peer networks have no centralised management. Each computer has to be configured with the user name and password for anyone that needs access to the shared resources.

    Peer to peer workgroups are small groups of computers. You can only have 10 concurrent connections on a W2K or XP box.

    Domains can have 10's of thousands of computers now with Active Directory.
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  7. oush

    oush Byte Poster

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    ahhhh i understand now thank u both for ur help!
     
    Certifications: MCITP: EA, Linux+, CCNA, CCDA
    WIP: CCIP

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