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Motherboard questions

Discussion in 'A+' started by mikehende, May 18, 2006.

  1. mikehende

    mikehende Kilobyte Poster

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    On page 276, last sentence in last paragraph, it discusses installing a Mobo and when replacing, it reads:

    "If the CPU or RAM has been removed, be sure to replace them before installing the Motherboard"

    I would like to know why the CPU and Ram can't be installed "after" installing the Mobo? Ok, the CPU I understand but the RAM?
     
  2. mikehende

    mikehende Kilobyte Poster

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    Alright, sorry guys, MM explains the answer to my question on the very next page, I swear, I feel like sometimes MM gives the answer first THEN asks the question. :D
     
  3. mikehende

    mikehende Kilobyte Poster

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    This I don't understand, page 277 talking about testing after installing the Mobo, last paragraph mentions:

    "If you don't have a POST card, install a keyboard, video card and monitor"

    My question is, doesn't ALL Mobo's come with an "integrated" video and sound card? If so, why the need to install a separate video card to test the Mobo?
     
  4. Malnomates

    Malnomates Megabyte Poster

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    Certainly modern motherboards are likely to have onboard video and sound,but that's not always the case with a modern unit.

    You may also find yourself replacing an older motherboard with a donor card from another machine,if you needed to use the existing CPU for example.

    You are being presented with all likely possibilities,which in theory you should be prepared for.There's an awful lot of legacy hardware out there that you as an A+ techie will be expected to deal with.

    Many motherboards will come with an onboard post card and the A+ syllabus expects you to know of their function and how to use them effectively.

    Hope this helps a little and feel free to ask more if needs be.. 8)
     
    Certifications: A+ Network+
  5. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    I'd agree with all of that - except for the bit about motherboards shipping with a post card (or onboard equiv). I have to say that I've never seen this!

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  6. mikehende

    mikehende Kilobyte Poster

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    Come to think of it, does this mean that I have to get my hands on a POST card and learn how to use prior to taking the exam?
     
  7. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    They aren't expensive, but as long as you are clear on what they do, then, no - you don't *have* to have one.

    But if you are doing troubleshooting on real PCs they are *very* useful!

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  8. mikehende

    mikehende Kilobyte Poster

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    while we're at it, how neccesary is it to have experience using a multitester before the exam?
     
  9. Malnomates

    Malnomates Megabyte Poster

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    You should know how to configure a multimeter (digital and analogue) to take specific readings.

    Know how to set a meter to..

    Take an AC voltage reading safely
    Take a DC voltage reading safely
    Measure resistance
    Know what abbreviations apply to each law (potential diference=voltage=volts=v/current=flow=amperes and so on)
    Know what will be displayed on digital/analogue meters when testing good/bad fuses and what will resistance show on the display.


    My motherboard and a few I've seen through the workshop have onboard post cards,though I must admit most do not.
     
    Certifications: A+ Network+
  10. Mr_Fishbulb

    Mr_Fishbulb Nibble Poster

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    Apart from thing you send to your family when you're on holiday, what exactly is a POST card? Never heard of them before.
     
    Certifications: Naff All
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  11. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    A cheap DVM from Maplins will give you a lot more confidence with the questions. And it is worth having one around anyway.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
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  12. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    just a quick point, make sure you know how to use the multimeter correct, otherwise your readings would not only inaccurate but also useless...
     
  13. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    During POST the BIOS sends codes to an I/O port that is usualy 'not there'. These codes indicate how the POST/boot is going.

    A POST card is an ISA or PCI card (some have both) that can be fitted, and has a small 7-segment display that shows the codes as they appear.

    If the POST fails it will show the code at that point, and you look this code up to see what has failed.

    Here is a link to a company selling them, plus a piccy of one.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
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  14. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    Cheers for that Harry, i have never actually seen one before, would there be a USB one, do you know, if there is, might just order myself, although they probably wont work on the older pc with usb aint supported...
     
  15. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    So how do you arange for USB to listen on an I/O port? :biggrin

    By their nature the standard POST card couldn't be USB.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
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  16. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    dunno, thought like if the BIOS supports USB then it might work...

    cheers anyway
     
  17. Mr_Fishbulb

    Mr_Fishbulb Nibble Poster

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    Cheers Harry.

    I guess this must be like some mobos I've seen with 4 LEDs on to help diagnost POST problems.
     
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  18. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Yes - very similar in idea. To be honest the POST card gives too much info - if an individual chip on the motherboard has failed then it is still motherboard replacement time.

    Those lights which you mention indicate the main areas of problems nicely without needing any more detail.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  19. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    How do they work, when i built my computer a couple of years ago, they have always been green, and i dont think i still got the manual for it?
     
  20. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    I've only ever seen these on recent Dell units. You need the manual to interpret them.

    If you don't have the manual then you should be able to download a copy from the manufacturers website.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+

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