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Mixed Certifications

Discussion in 'Training & Development' started by Colin1, Jun 12, 2007.

  1. Colin1

    Colin1 Byte Poster

    Hello people, hope you are all doing well! I was just asking for an opinion(s) on having mixed certifications. I understand that some employers dont like this, however I am studying my CIW version5 and my A+, N+. Will this go against me when I apply for a job? I am an IT technician but I wish to broden my horizon. Is there such thing as an IT all rounder?

    Thanks guys

    C :p
    Certifications: Cisco IT Essentials,
    WIP: IT degree, CIW (Web), A+, N+
  2. derkit

    derkit Gigabyte Poster

    While I doubt an employer will look negatively on having a broad range of certs, they will do if you have no experience to go with them - ie, I'm not in a web job, if I had 1 cert - I'd see that as being OK, as broadening my horizons definitely, if I had another one, maybe a higher one it may come across as being indecisive in which direction you want to go as certs can take time and commitment to complete.

    If I had a CCNA for example and I've never worked in a networking environment, I'd have thought I'd get away with it. If I went for the next one up (CCDA I think) and still didn't have any work experience on networking, I personally think it would start to raise questions to an employer.

    Diversify and broadening horizons great, going up a path too high and without work experience and you may start to have questions asked.
    Certifications: MBCS, BSc(Hons), Cert(Maths), A+, Net+, MCDST, ITIL-F v3, MCSA
    WIP: 70-293
  3. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

    You mean a jack of all trades, master of none? Yes there are, however like the saying goes, you'll have a very broad knowledge of everything, but your mastery will not be there.

    Like all IT professionals, I believe that you have to know alittle bit about everything, however you do have to pick what route you want to do and go down it. And if you ever need more info than the basics, there are webpages, forums (like this) and books around.

    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  4. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

    I think its very important to have a good grounding on which to build, I see this as being no different than someone on a computer degree course that takes different modules to widen their knowledge.

    Its hard to judge the attitudes of different employers, if you are worried about their perception theres no reason you can't create multiple CVs for different target markets or jobs and leave the certs off if need be.

    I think one important thing to note is that yes potentially you are splitting your effort, you may become an amateur in many fields and a master of none. You could be using Occams razor in reverse and diminising your efforts in any one area.

    The certs you mentioned are all entry level certs, if you achieve them then why not. You can then aim for both support and web developer positions and choose to specialise later. I don't think anyone should pigeon hole themself by specialising too early, as mentioned things like 3 yr degrees are designed to help with this.

    Personally I've always tried to learn as much as I can about all aspects of IT, I don't make these artifical boundaries, I don't know everything but I try my best. I would take some of certs mentioned around here which are not programming certs given enough time.

    Some people, okay admitted they tend to get labled 'genius' but they manage to make major contributions to MANY diverse fields.
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  5. Colin1

    Colin1 Byte Poster

    Yep, I see what you mean guys. Thats sound advice (as always), I am in a decent position now with my job prospects as I have experience and I will soon have have some certs to boot. Will the fact that I am doing a degree help me when I am applying for other jobs (in an academic sense) as well as having techncial experience?


    C :biggrin
    Certifications: Cisco IT Essentials,
    WIP: IT degree, CIW (Web), A+, N+
  6. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

    Well theres no one right way to develop a career, some people accomplish an incredible amount without a degree, alot of them get awarded 'honorary' degrees.

    For most people a degree is a sound investment. Alot of people go into higher eduation now, this raises the eduational bar for employers. To filter applications its easy for them to just mandate a degree level education. Of course you don't have to work for these companies but if you do want to, its easier to meet their criteria.

    Theres anedoctal evidence that education helps you climb the corporate ladder, its not really possible to determine to what degree this is true. I would try to find mentors, or people that you admire or want to be like and find out how they approach life, how did they get where they are today. How did they achieve success ?

    Some self help stuff is BS, however some of it is plain common sense :-

    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  7. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

    I doubt that employers would look down on it (why should they as long as you can do your job) and in fact, they might tap you for work in a different direction if they know you can do that job, too.

    On the other hand, taking certifications for their own sake is probably a waste of time and money. A good grounding in hardware, basic OS, and networking can be applied to web design so I don't think there's an issue there. Also, there are qualification combinations (whether you're certified or not) that makes sense.

    Plenty of software engineers I know are also well versed in server and PC hardware since they have to know how programs are executed inside the machine. The ones I've worked with are also knowledgable in the area of networking.
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  8. Colin1

    Colin1 Byte Poster

    Thats the point I was gettin at trip, thats what I am trying to do, slowly as it may seem :twisted:

    Cheers pal

    C :D
    Certifications: Cisco IT Essentials,
    WIP: IT degree, CIW (Web), A+, N+
  9. Keimos

    Keimos Byte Poster

    Hi Colin1,

    Do not worry about mixing the CIW Foundations and the Network+ as both cover much of the same materials regarding networking. The CIW cert obviously being more geared towards internet hosting services, ftp etc. In addition you will add basic web skills to your CV which can be a bonus if you are looking for some jobs as many companies that host there own internet/intranet websites are looking for that cross set of skills.

    Certifications: Microsoft Office Specialist

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