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MCSE Course Paid By Employers But Theres a Catch...

Discussion in 'Training & Development' started by Godson, Aug 15, 2005.

  1. Godson

    Godson Bit Poster

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    K about to start my MCSE course which will be paid for by my lovely financial firm, but however before starting this course i was given an extra clause in my contract, the clause is along the lines of: "...... I have to stay with the company for a min. of 3 years"

    Does that sound right? What will happen if I break this clause? (I can’t make such a long term commitment with me being a Uni Graduate, and the only thing I care about is what job pays me more :D )
     
  2. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    its a pretty normal clause
    3 years is a bitch though, I wouldnt do it if it was more than 1 year because, i change jobs so much :)
    its normal tho, to keep thier investment sound, however id expect a pay rise after completion too

    if you break the contract they chage you for the cost of the training

    and your in the wrong industry if all you care about is which job pays the most :)
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, VCP
    WIP: > 0
  3. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

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    I'm seconding you on all points there, Phoenix :D

    It happened the same with me - companies do it as a point to cover a lot of training costs - it's a way of payback on their 'investment'. Mine was a 2 year sign off for forklift training. I 'lost' the paperwork and left. But apparently people don't get away with it that often.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
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  4. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    The idea is that if the company ponies up that kind of money to train you, they don't want you up and quiting the minute you get your MCSE. They want to get their money's worth out of you. Here's a question. Is that 3 years *after* earning the MCSE, or 3 years starting now? It will take you time to study for and pass all of those exams, you know.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  5. Godson

    Godson Bit Poster

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    It is 3 years *after* i pass my MCSE.... It should take me no more than a year to get my MCSE so its a 4 years contract :cry: :cry: ....

    So what industry should i be in if all i care about is money? Sales?
     
  6. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Most IT guys don't make good salesmen and most salesmen don't make good IT guys. Different personalities are drawn to each, and these two fields are at opposite ends of the spectrum, personality-wise.

    Looking for a job on the basis of money only is a pretty good way to find yourself in careers in which you're not going to be happy or enjoy what you are doing. And since work is something you will spend a minimum of 1/3 of your life doing for quite a few years enjoying your work is pretty important. The way you're looking at work right now there's a pretty good chance of ending up hating what you do and just being plain miserable at work for many years.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  7. mrvolleyball

    mrvolleyball Bit Poster

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    The old saying of "find a job you love and you'll never have to work a day in your whole life" seems to ring true here.

    (sorry this isn't related at all to the original question)
     
  8. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

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    No, but it's the reason most people (should) go in to the IT field. Definitely more job satisfaction than bank satisfaction.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  9. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    To get back to the original subject, Godson...I guess it just depends on what's more important to you and whether or not this opportunity is worth working for your current employer for the next four years. If it is (boy, I'd hate to try to look that far into the future), then go for it. If not, you'll have to find another avenue of paying for your education and retaining your right to move on to another job when you see fit. Good luck.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  10. Godson

    Godson Bit Poster

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    I know what you guys r saying is true but i'm at that point in my life where i'm not too sure what i'm really good at; let me explain in details....

    I'm 22 with a Business IT degree, so i have a variety of skills and interest; business and IT interest. But i know deep down i want to be in IT because (as the actor ones said) "thats what i can do..."

    But however my goal 20 years from now is to move in Systems Analyst or Management Consultant or Project Management (something along the lines of Management and IT), my question is what path in IT do i have to take to get to this goal???
     
  11. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    There's probably more than one road to get to where you want to be...especially with a 20 year runway. You might want to figure out a way to locate the general qualifications for the positions you are shooting at. If possible, schedule short, information gathering interviews with people who hold those positions (it can be done) and ask what the inside scoop it.

    I found this little sample on the Internet (Google is your friend). Maybe it will give you a taste of what folks are looking for.

    http://jobs.state.va.us/careerguides/ComputerSystemsAnalyst.htm
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+

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