1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

MCITP: Desktop Support Technician vs Enterprise Desktop Administrator

Discussion in 'Windows Vista / 7 / 8 Client Exams' started by Apoc220, Feb 14, 2012.

  1. Apoc220

    Apoc220 Byte Poster

    147
    13
    34
    Hey Guys,

    So I'm going to be learning me some Windows 7 now and have a question regarding the desktop support tracks available. The two that interest me are the DST and EDA tracks. Having done the MCDST I looked at the DST track and it seems like it would be a rehash of what I learned doing the MCDST. Obviously it's on Windows 7, but from the experience I have had with Windows 7 there is too much carry over to justify doing the DST when the EDA has things that I would like experience on. So short of the long is I would appreciate you guys giving me some input on this. Am I looking at this the right way or is there really that stuff in the 70-685 that I couldn't figure out on my own based on the MCDST? I also figure that the work I do on the 70-686 will be more beneficial for me as I am looking to do more of a sysadmin role and will compliment the MCITP:SA. Thoughts? Thanks in advance.
     
    Certifications: MCDST
    WIP: 70-680
  2. Nyx

    Nyx Byte Poster

    131
    8
    15
    Not done 70-685 but I had a go at 70-680 and failed. MCDST is(was) 10x easier I'd say, I have passed it with flying colours without much studying, anytime I tried to learn I was falling asleep, knew 90% of it already. You need to learn a lot about win7 deployment, would strongly suggest labbing it. I do think that MS Press book is not enough on the topic, unless you know it in and out from work. Myself I'd go for EDA if I worked in 7/2008 environment. Good luck!
     
  3. soundian

    soundian Gigabyte Poster

    1,460
    71
    107
    The 680 is much more like the 270 than the 271/272 combo. Do not take this exam lightly.I don't know how many times harder than the MCDST it is, but I know it's a lot harder. 10x harder, as Nyx suggests, may not be far from the truth.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+,MCDST,MCTS(680), MCP(270, 271, 272), ITILv3F, CCENT
    WIP: Knuckling down at my new job
  4. Apoc220

    Apoc220 Byte Poster

    147
    13
    34
    Believe me, I am not taking the 70-680 lightly. I've heard enough to know that it is tricky. As far as labbing goes I have a 2k8 r2 box setup and will be doing deployment labs in addition to playing around with the windows 7 client itself. I am more interested in knowing if I am right to think that I would gain more by taking the 686 instead of the 685 since the 685 is more or less topics that I learned through MCDST and can figure them out in windows 7 as a result.
     
    Certifications: MCDST
    WIP: 70-680
  5. Nyx

    Nyx Byte Poster

    131
    8
    15
    I see what u meant now, looking at 70-685 exam objectives seems very similar to MCDST. But I don't believe it is as straightforward. My bad, I thought there's a lot of overlap between 685 and 686, they seem to have not that much in common after all. It is up to you really, you can always do both. IMO EDA would make more sense if you are working with 7/2008, simply it would be a lot easier to prepare and pass.
     
  6. RichyV

    RichyV Megabyte Poster Forum Leader

    536
    17
    79
    The MCITP:EDST7 is related to, but not comparable with, the MCDST - much of it is VERY different but there is enough of a similarity of roles that MS offer an upgrade exam from one to the other; it is 70-682. This one exam on top of an MCDST will give you MCTS: Windows 7, Configuring AND MCITP:EDST7. For this reason alone I would always say go this route if you already have an MCDST.
    The 70-686 can then be added later to ALSO give you MCITP:EDA.

    Up to the individual of course (I know many on here have taken the separate route of 70-680 & 685 even when holding the MCDST), but it's the way I would find most beneficial.

    There is no direct upgrade path to MCITP:EDA from MCDST, so the separate exams would have to be taken for this route alone.

    HTH
     
    Certifications: B.Sc.(Hons), MBCS. MCP (271,272), MCDST, MCTS (680), MCITP:EDST7, MCSA:WIN7, MCPS, MCNPS
    WIP: 70-686, then onto MCSE: Desktop Infrastructure via MCSA: Server 2012...
  7. Apoc220

    Apoc220 Byte Poster

    147
    13
    34
    I'm not too keen on the upgrade option as you're essentially memorizing the materials for two exams. I'd prefer to take the two exam route just so that I can focus the appropriate time on the different aspects of the exams and learn it all. Time is the only thing I have to spend as my veterans benefits subsidize the exam. Pass or fail!
     
    Certifications: MCDST
    WIP: 70-680
  8. RichyV

    RichyV Megabyte Poster Forum Leader

    536
    17
    79
    Hi, yes there's certainly a lot in the 2 exams and, as I mentioned, not everybody feels comfortable in learning and taking them together.
    Can I ask if your doing these for your own pleasure? Only a couple of things you've mentioned like "...essentially memorizing the materials..." and "...I am looking to do more of a sysadmin role.." and "...and learn it all" seems to suggest that this is not your day-to-day job.
    Apologies if I'm way off the mark but passing these exams will not help much if they are not backing-up real-world experience. They are not cheap (study materials and exam prices being what they are) and I would be doing you a disservice if I didn't mention this.

    HTH
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2012
    Certifications: B.Sc.(Hons), MBCS. MCP (271,272), MCDST, MCTS (680), MCITP:EDST7, MCSA:WIN7, MCPS, MCNPS
    WIP: 70-686, then onto MCSE: Desktop Infrastructure via MCSA: Server 2012...
  9. Apoc220

    Apoc220 Byte Poster

    147
    13
    34
    Haha... ok, for the record I have over seven years experience supporting windows. Been through helpdesk, desktop support, and have done a decent amount of server work. I'm not looking to memorize info for a test. I'm just looking on expanding my knowledge base to expand on the experience that I have so far. I'm looking to gain some more server knowledge (particularly infrastructure) so that I can make myself more marketable and finally break into the sysadmin role that I have been working towards. My goal is to do the win7 cert and then focus on the MCITP:SA track. Anyway, no worries on the question. You're absolutely right that it's good to tell people when they're putting the cart before the horse.
     
    Certifications: MCDST
    WIP: 70-680
  10. RichyV

    RichyV Megabyte Poster Forum Leader

    536
    17
    79
    Then of course you are going about this the right way and I shall shut up! :biggrin

    Seriously though, I guess I mis-read some of your statements and it would seem that following the separate 70-680 & 70-686 exam route is probably best suited for your circumstances.

    I do find Desktop Admin to be rather a 'niche' requirement in that not many organisations regard it as 'stand-alone' and, as you're alluding to, does generally come under the Sys Admin umbrella.

    Myself, I'm rather playing catch-up with 14 years experience but only with study covering one year. I spent 12 years as 1st/2nd/3rd line support, installation engineer and training guru! But not much training was on offer for me, so now I'm working my way through, starting with the Client-side stuff and moving into server-side & networking (as you can probably see from my sig...).

    Good luck with it..!
     
    Certifications: B.Sc.(Hons), MBCS. MCP (271,272), MCDST, MCTS (680), MCITP:EDST7, MCSA:WIN7, MCPS, MCNPS
    WIP: 70-686, then onto MCSE: Desktop Infrastructure via MCSA: Server 2012...
  11. Apoc220

    Apoc220 Byte Poster

    147
    13
    34
    It's all good, Rich. I know you meant no harm with the comment, so no worries. You're definitely right about the niche aspect of desktop administration. The majority of places I have been have had me doing desktop admin in addition to server work. The smaller the organisation, the more likely you won't just be sitting in front of desktops or RDP and actually working on some servers.

    In my case, I did five years in the military which stagnated my development due to the outsourcing of IT operations to a managed services provider. For the first three years of my contract I wasn't really learning anything new IT-wise. I lucked out and during my fourth year when I was sent to a unit that still managed their own infrastructure. That was definitely a learning experience for me. Got to play with SANs, VM ESX servers, even did some web work. That year alone I attribute to the majority of my success after leaving the military. Anyway, now I'm past seven years and I'm at the point where I am very confident in my desktop support abilities. Now it is time for me to get my server hat on so that I can move into a full-time server administrator job. I know realistically I will still be supporting desktops if I'm doing server work, so I want to make sure that I don't slack on my windows 7 training. In this job market you gotta have every advantage you can get, ya know?

    Anyway, best of luck with your training.
     
    Certifications: MCDST
    WIP: 70-680

Share This Page

Loading...