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Long Road out of Eden

Discussion in 'The Lounge - Off Topic' started by ffreeloader, Dec 22, 2007.

  1. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    My wife presented me with a new album today. The first new album I've had in a many year, and I just love it. As far as I'm concerned, the Eagles hit a grand slam with Long Road Out of Eden. I've listened to it all the way through twice in a row now, and I like it even better the second time through than I did the first time. This is what I would have called "truckin" music a few years ago. It's an album I would stick in the cd player on a long trip, just keep on driving, and forget to take change cd's for 3 or 4 hours. I'd just listen to it again and again.

    A lot of people dislike this album because they express their political opinions in the music, but that's always been a part of rock and roll. The 60's rock and roll was full of protest music, and American folk music, one of the real forerunners of rock and roll had performers that made careers out of singing protest songs. Bob Dylan, Graham Nash, Neil Young, Joan Baez, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, and many other huge stars have expressed their political opinions and done a lot of commentary on social values in their music so I don't get the backlash against the Eagles for doing the same thing. I mean, what were the songs on Hotel California if they weren't social commentary, and that's praised while their new stuff is panned. Like I said, I just don't get it. As far as I'm concerned this is classic Eagles music, and I like it.

    Joe Walsh, as usual, sounds just like Joe Walsh on his songs, and he gets praised for being "innovative and fresh", yet to me his two songs are shades of "The Smoker You Drink, The Player You Get" all over again, and that album is 35 years old. Don't get me wrong. I love "The Smoker You Drink, The Player You Get". It's a classic album, and one of the best ever in my book. I have it on cd after wearing out a few vinyl copies and several cassettes.

    I just don't understand why music that is so obviously in the same style Joe's been writing for more than 3 decades is thought of as being innovative for him while Glenn Frye's and Don Henley's music is panned for being of the same style they've always written. Maybe it's just because many people have just never recognized Joe Walsh's genius before. His distinctive music is timeless, without a doubt, and will still be good in another 35 years. IMO, people will still be discovering him anew all over again then too.

    This album is a return to what was produced in the 70's as far as this isn't "hit music". Its album music. The album is much greater than the sum of it's parts. It's like a Moody Blues album in that way. Their music didn't get radio play and have "hit tunes", but their albums musically dwarfed the vast majority of their contemporaries. You sat down and listened to an entire album to get the experience and to really appreciate their artistry. They told stories in their albums that took an hour to listen to and digest. They were not, and were not intended to be, a 2 minute jingle for the mindless.

    That's sort of what this album reminds me of. It's much better listened to all the way through than a bit here and a bit there. It's not in the same class as a Moody Blues album, but not many ever will be, and I don't think it was meant to be that kind of album. But, it is much more an album than just a collection of songs as the Eagles have something to say, and they say it. They just don't do it in the same story book style that the Moody Blues did so well.
     
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  2. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Wow! Reading your post is like a stroll down memory lane. We are so obviously of the same generation in terms of our music. BTW, I *love* the title, but I suppose it'll be awhile before I hear any of the tracks. After many years, I'm just now starting to re-build my collection of music and so far, most of what I've purchased is jazz (Coltraine, Miles Davis, Bill Evans, Herbie Hancock, to name a few). I have my eye on some spanish guitar (John Williams and Andres Segovia...who I was fortunate enough to see perform live in San Francisco back in 1978). I also have a secret desire to get the song "Save Me" by Remy Zero (theme from the Smallville TV show). :oops:

    BTW...they're CDs now...not "albums". :wink:
     
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  3. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

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    I keep meaning to get a copy, I love The Eagles.
     
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  4. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    I'm not a huge jazz fan, but some of it is pretty good. It's just once jazz goes so far freeform I lose contact with it. I like John Coltraine, Miles Davis, and Herbie Hancock though.

    I also have some music you would probably really like if you're a jazz fan. Ever heard of Acoustic Alchemy? I love their music. I have three of their albums, "Back on the Case", "Reference Point", and "Red Dust and Spanish Lace".

    I'm not a really big fan of music that's completely instrumental because I think that since music is such a force for communication it just begs to be used to say what's on your mind. However, Acoustic Alchemy, quite a bit of Mozart--especially Eine Kliene Nacht Music--and some Bach and Johann Strauss can just take me away and put me somewhere other than where I'm at, at the moment. It's music to immerse yourself in.

    Same with the Moody Blues. Their orchestration, subject matter, and way of flowing from one song to the next using musical breaks rather than silences makes their albums one single musical experience. The Moody Blues though really set themselves apart with the way they address the human condition. I mean lyrics like the following from "The Candle of Life" on "To Our Childrens Childrens Children" speak to the heart of everyone. They express things that everyone has felt, and combined with the incredible instrumental music the Moody Blues play it's powerful stuff.

    Code:
    Something you can't hide
    Says you're lonely
    Hidden deep inside
    Of you only
    It's there for you to see
    Take a look and be
    Burn slowly the candle of life
    
    Something there outside
    Says we're only
    In the hands of time
    Falling slowly
    It's there for us to know
    With love that we can go
    Burn slowly the candle of life
    
    So love everybody
    And make them your friend
    So love everybody
    And make them your friend
    
    Something you can't hide
    Says you're lonely
    Hidden deep inside
    Of you only
    It's there for you to see
    Take a look and be
    Burn slowly the candle of life
    
    Something there outside
    Says we're only
    In the hands of time
    Falling slowly
    It's there for us to know
    With love that we can go
    Burn slowly the candle of life
    Funny how no matter what kind of music I start out talking about, I end up talking about the Moody Blues again. I guess it's because I figure they're in a class of their own.
     
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  5. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Thanks for the heads up Freddy, i too am a big Eagles fan. If you want to actually see them perform, i would recommend the DVD "Hell Freezes Over". It was made after they got back together again, apparently one of them said, they would get back together when hell freezes over :) The musicianship which is captured brilliantly on this DVD by the director is second to none 8)

    I love the Moody Blues too :)
     
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