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LONG COMMANDS??? learning!?

Discussion in 'General Microsoft Certifications' started by shocksl, Jan 25, 2012.

  1. shocksl

    shocksl Byte Poster

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    i have read 1 or 2 chapters from the MS book. Some of the Commands are massive and difficult to learn lol.

    Do I need to remember each cmd by heart. Or is it good enough if I would be able to recall them just in the exam if they come up.

    The reason I ask is , I'm sure in an IT proffesional environment, Things like this could be easily looked up on google or something. How many of you actually remember each n every single command line?

    Any advice would be a great help.

    thanks
     
  2. soundian

    soundian Gigabyte Poster

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    You need to know the common switches for each command. What the common ones are is something you have to really work out for yourself but use practice exams and common sense to work out which is which.
    In real life <command> /? does the trick, doesn't cut the mustard in exams though.
    In Cisco exams the help option is disabled in the command line questions so no easy easy ride there either.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+,MCDST,MCTS(680), MCP(270, 271, 272), ITILv3F, CCENT
    WIP: Knuckling down at my new job
  3. derkit

    derkit Gigabyte Poster

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    I agree with soundian - common switches is good. I'd add that I wouldn't have thought you need to use more than one switch per command so that may bring down the number you need to be aware of.

    I used "to be aware of" in the last sentence because many of the commands you should use in your day to day job. As in you shouldn't be needing to learn and remember them as if you use them most days of the week, they should come natually to you.

    If you don't use them every day - virtualise and practice using them over and over. I remember once a contractor leaving my team and said that a question she had been previously asked was what is the switch that resolves hostnames whilst using ping. I didn't know what it was as I hadn't had a need to use it so far, now I use it multiple times a day. I didn't need to learn it - I already used and knew it.
     
    Certifications: MBCS, BSc(Hons), Cert(Maths), A+, Net+, MCDST, ITIL-F v3, MCSA
    WIP: 70-293
  4. shocksl

    shocksl Byte Poster

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    okay thanks for that. I am still learning so what do you mean by 'common switches' ? I would also apreciate a few examples.

    your both repped ;)
     
  5. derkit

    derkit Gigabyte Poster

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    For example:
    Code:
    C:\Users\Admin>ping /?
    
    Usage: ping [-t] [-a] [-n count] [-l size] [-f] [-i TTL] [-v TOS]
                [-r count] [-s count] [[-j host-list] | [-k host-list]]
                [-w timeout] [-R] [-S srcaddr] [-4] [-6] target_name
    
    Options:
        -t             Ping the specified host until stopped.
                       To see statistics and continue - type Control-Break;
                       To stop - type Control-C.
        -a             Resolve addresses to hostnames.
        -n count       Number of echo requests to send.
        -l size        Send buffer size.
        -f             Set Don't Fragment flag in packet (IPv4-only).
        -i TTL         Time To Live.
        -v TOS         Type Of Service (IPv4-only. This setting has been deprecated
                       and has no effect on the type of service field in the IP Hea
    er).
        -r count       Record route for count hops (IPv4-only).
        -s count       Timestamp for count hops (IPv4-only).
        -j host-list   Loose source route along host-list (IPv4-only).
        -k host-list   Strict source route along host-list (IPv4-only).
        -w timeout     Timeout in milliseconds to wait for each reply.
        -R             Use routing header to test reverse route also (IPv6-only).
        -S srcaddr     Source address to use.
        -4             Force using IPv4.
        -6             Force using IPv6.
    Personally, I'd take the "common switches" for ping to be: -t and -a. The rest whilst have their uses, either I don't use often, or not at all. It could be absolutely rubbish I'm typing, but that's how I try and work it out.
    ipconfig switches - all I've used and so therefore are common.
    netstat - probably only ever used a couple of switches.

    BTW I just copied this from a Win7 machine.
     
    Certifications: MBCS, BSc(Hons), Cert(Maths), A+, Net+, MCDST, ITIL-F v3, MCSA
    WIP: 70-293
  6. Cunningfox

    Cunningfox Byte Poster

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    There must be a good practice for this tbh, as 'commonly used' depends on situation, in the ping example I've never used -a but have used -l frequently and -f infrequently, obviously -t is the important one imo.

    Oh and on Cisco exams you can indeed use the help to get the right command in most cases, you just waste time doing it.
     
    Certifications: CCNP, CCNA, MCP
    WIP: ??
  7. soundian

    soundian Gigabyte Poster

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    All the info I was given on the CCENT was that the help functions and command complete functions were disabled in the exam CLI. I don't think I even tried.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+,MCDST,MCTS(680), MCP(270, 271, 272), ITILv3F, CCENT
    WIP: Knuckling down at my new job
  8. Cunningfox

    Cunningfox Byte Poster

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    I think they tell you that, I remember receiving similar advice then finding that it wasn't accurate. To be fair it's better to just know the commands just incase anyway so it's no bad thing.
     
    Certifications: CCNP, CCNA, MCP
    WIP: ??
  9. derkit

    derkit Gigabyte Poster

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    Fair do - I must admit not using -f and -l, but you are right there must be a good practice, but what I don't know :)
     
    Certifications: MBCS, BSc(Hons), Cert(Maths), A+, Net+, MCDST, ITIL-F v3, MCSA
    WIP: 70-293
  10. shocksl

    shocksl Byte Poster

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    thanks for the headsup guys!

    Well I am currently tryin to study for 70-680

    I am learning about migrating from XP to Win 7.

    It shows me a command line to use in scanstate and loadstate.

    However when I Youtubed USTM 4.0 ...He was doing a hell lot more than the few pages i read on it from the MS Press Book!

    So can someone please shed some light on this, I am losing hope :(
     
  11. shocksl

    shocksl Byte Poster

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    has anyone got any insight to the above question?^
     
  12. derkit

    derkit Gigabyte Poster

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    No immediate insight as I haven't done a migration using scan/loadstate, but I have heard of them before.

    If there is a difference between the MS Press book and the youtube video, I'd search around other websites to see how they would go about doing the same thing.
     
    Certifications: MBCS, BSc(Hons), Cert(Maths), A+, Net+, MCDST, ITIL-F v3, MCSA
    WIP: 70-293
  13. soundian

    soundian Gigabyte Poster

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    Certifications: A+, N+,MCDST,MCTS(680), MCP(270, 271, 272), ITILv3F, CCENT
    WIP: Knuckling down at my new job
  14. Gav

    Gav Kilobyte Poster

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    It's a while since I sat it, but I don't remember the 70-680 expecting you to know too much command line detail.

    I'm really glad Microsoft are pushing PowerShell so heavily in the next release of Windows. From what I understand, almost all the 'old' commands have been converted to PowerShell Cmdlets, which is a major step forward in my eyes. Microsoft have a strict naming convention for PowerShell, so it should make it easier to 'guess' the command you want to use. Powershell tends to use full word switches as well, which is a major improvement.

    (I'm a major PowerShell fan :twisted:)
     
  15. jk2447

    jk2447 Petabyte Poster Moderator

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    Don't worry mate, most of us don't remember all of the commands, just a few we use often. 2 words for you my friend. Batch files :)
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), HND IT, HND Computing, ITIL-F, MBCS CITP, MCP (270,290,291,293,294,298,299,410,411,412) MCTS (401,620,624,652) MCSA:Security, MCSE: Security, Security+, CPTS, VCP4, CCA (XenApp6.5), MCSA 2012, VCP5, VCP6-NV
  16. shocksl

    shocksl Byte Poster

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    thank you soooo much guys for the responses above., It has really made a huge difference to me.

    Could someone explain what does command line 'switches' mean? I'm hearing this alot.
     
  17. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Ref: Command-line interface - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  18. shocksl

    shocksl Byte Poster

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    thanks for that, and repped you all!

    so does all the commands have a certain structure in Wiin 7?
     

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