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Logical Topologies - Mike Meyers

Discussion in 'Network+' started by scottymac1979, Mar 24, 2010.

  1. scottymac1979

    scottymac1979 New Member

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    Hi All,

    Having worked in IT for a few years, I thought I'd look at a few certifications and have just grabbed a copy of Mike Meyers Network+ All-in-one fourth edition hoping to brush up.

    I never thought I'd have a problem with Logical/Signal topologies, thinking that I had a pretty good understanding in this area.

    My understanding has always been.

    Network with a hub - physical star, logical bus

    with a switch - physical star, logical star

    with a MAU - physical star, logical ring.

    Mike Meyers seems not to use these terms, instead opting for point-to-point, or point-to-multipoint. Fair enough, I've heard this used before. My understanding of this was:

    Physical Bus network - point-to-multipoint (or possibly broadcast ?)

    Network with a hub - point-to-multipoint

    Network with a switch - point-to-point (because the host sends to the switch, which sends to the correct host directly)

    Network with MAU - point-to-point (it travels from host-to-host until the correct host is found)

    Mike Meyers states that a point-to-multipoint network differs from a star because it requires an intelligent device at the centre. He then says that a point-to-point connection is only ever two machines without any kind of device in between, say when a cross-over cable is used.

    It's on page 56 if anyone has the book.

    Hope you know what I mean, does anyone have a definitive answer on how point-to-point etc. relates to what I have always called Logical Topology.

    Thanks very much !!
     
  2. scottymac1979

    scottymac1979 New Member

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    Maybe I didn't phrase the question properly. I'll try again ...

    Can anyone confirm if the following networks are considered point-to-point, or point-to-multipoint

    Physical Bus

    Star with a hub

    Star with a switch

    Star with MAU

    Star with WAP

    Sorry if I'm being thick are the above terms applicable to logical/signal topology in anyway or are they purely physical ?

    Thanks again
     
  3. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    I think I understand what Meyers is getting at here. A star made up of a bunch of point-to-point links with a device at the center to handle the traffic flowing to/from those links. A point-to-multipoint topology doesn't require that intelligent device... it's simply a bunch of endpoints connected to the same "piece of string". Although it can LOOK like a star, it doesn't necessarily have to be a star... it could be a straight bus. Using a hub WOULD make it look like a star, but the hub basically connects the "pieces of string" together into one long piece of string with branches. All of the devices are still on the same "wire", since hubs simply rebroadcast out all ports.

    Whatever terminology Mike uses in his book is likely the terminology they're using on the exam. As long as you understand what's what, you'll do just fine on the exam, particularly since you've been in IT a while.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2010
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  4. scottymac1979

    scottymac1979 New Member

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    Thanks for the reply, I think I'm ok with it now. Not doubting Mike in anyway, I know he's highly thought of, I think it was just the way that it was illustrated as a star that made it look a little confusing.

    The key, as you said is that point-to-multipoint doesn't HAVE to be a star at all. I was just getting all mixed up with the Logical/Signal Topology stuff I did years ago. I realise now that this is kind of a separate issue and I was probably looking too much into it.

    Thanks again :D
     
  5. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Yeah, the CompTIA exams sometimes use their own terminology and methodology that often differs from "real world"... which sometimes makes it difficult for techs who really know what they're doing. ;) So I totally understand your confusion. :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!

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