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logical operators

Discussion in 'Training & Development' started by zxspectrum, Aug 19, 2006.

  1. zxspectrum

    zxspectrum Gigabyte Poster Premium Member

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    OK ive been looking at the sites that people have recommended in regartds to logical operators

    Now i know what they do, they help you get a norrow search a broad search or even the narrowest search. But whats baffling me and this is why im here (again). sometime i need something put into plain english etc.

    Now as i said i know what they do, when i search for something say for example ' cheap flights to sacramento'

    Would i type in after that " all of these words" "any of these words" or "look for this phrase", depending on the type of seacrh i wanted, ie narrow, narrowest, or broadsearch. Or is this done automatically for me in the background. ???:oops:

    Thanks again guys
     
    Certifications: BSc computing and information systems
    WIP: 70-680
  2. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    First - how you do this depends on the search engine - they are all different in some way. Most of them have a help page that describes the rules.

    On Google you wouldn't *type* the "all of these words" phrase - you go to the advanced search page and select it. Google has a help page that shows what you can use to narrow a search - such as preceeding a word with +. Again on Google - you can match the whole of a phrase by enclosing it in double quotes.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
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  3. zxspectrum

    zxspectrum Gigabyte Poster Premium Member

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    Ive nearly finished writing up a piece, i dont suppose you would have a butchers for me would you Harry, just to let me know im on the right lines??
     
    Certifications: BSc computing and information systems
    WIP: 70-680
  4. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Sure - no probs. :biggrin

    Harry.
     
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  5. zxspectrum

    zxspectrum Gigabyte Poster Premium Member

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    Introduction:
    When searching for information on the internet, one of the many things that you may come across is the list of results you get back, or to be more clearer the list of results you get back that are of no use to you. This however is not the search engines fault, as it can only be told what to look for by the information it has been given.

    This is where logical operators come in; these can help your search to be more productive in the amount of results you get by the relevance of the terms you use. For example if I was going to search for tickets for a cup final, even though cup final tickets would be a way of searching, I would get a lot of results. These results would be of little use as there would be that many results displayed that I could not find what I was looking for straight away, instead I would have the tedious task of trawling through countless sites or pages with never truly getting what I wanted.

    Now if I narrowed the search down by typing “Liverpool v West Ham Utd 2006 cup final” I would get a more detailed feedback from the search engine and I would not have to trawl through lots and lots of meaningless pages of other site that have little relevance. Below are three types of logical operators

    “All of these words” narrow search
    “Any of these words” broad search
    “Look for this phrase” narrowest.
    www.bsa.cbsc.org


    Conclusion:
    Being more precise with what you type in to a search engine usually will be enough for you if it is a commonly sought after item etc. Not all browsers support this option, which I got from the advanced option on Google, but when you do use it you do get a lot more results from a finer selection of options.


    I hope that makes sense- cheers for looking over it for me Harry
     
    Certifications: BSc computing and information systems
    WIP: 70-680
  6. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    First - I'm not sure what that URL is doing in the middle there!

    Strictly speaking, you haven't mentioned any logical operators, although they are there by implication.

    Logical operators are words such as AND , OR, NOT .

    "All of these words" implies AND between each word - which is the default Google form. "Any of these words" implies OR between each word. And finaly "Look for this phrase" wants an exact match, so there are no operators as there is only one 'item' to search for.

    The article is fine if you are intending to introduce web searching to newbies (I'll leave others to tidy up the syntax), but not quite on target if you are intending to talk about the thread title.

    I hope this helps.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  7. zxspectrum

    zxspectrum Gigabyte Poster Premium Member

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    well the URL is for referencing purposes so my work can be checked etc.

    This is the question i have to answer:

    A) Discuss online how you would use logical operators in searches to gain the most relevant information. Then write an explanation, with the aid of examples, showing how you would use logical operators in searches to gain the most relevant information.

    I cant think why im falling at such an early hurdle, maybe as ive never heard of this logical operator etc ?? what do think?

    Cheers Eddie
     
    Certifications: BSc computing and information systems
    WIP: 70-680
  8. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    OK - lets have a go at this....

    The snag is that it doesn't seem relevant to the question. Unless I'm missing something.
    In the world of programming and associated stuff 'operators' has a very specific meaning.

    Most of us are familiar with expressions like a + b. Here '+' is an operator which means add, so the expression means 'add a to b'.

    When we deal with logic there are specific operators for that called 'logical operators'. Logical items can be true or false, so the operators deal with that. An example is 'a AND b'. This means that the result is only true if both a and b are true.

    When we use such things in a search engine we say things like 'A+ AND certforums'. This will return matches where both are true.

    If we say 'A+ OR certforums' then we get results where *either* is true.

    Does this help?

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
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  9. zxspectrum

    zxspectrum Gigabyte Poster Premium Member

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    It makes more sense than what ive written, i think id better sleep on it and have a bash again tomorrow. Your help is very much appreciated , remind me of this when this crimbo booze up comes around, ill get you a beer for your troubles

    Cheers
    Eddie
     
    Certifications: BSc computing and information systems
    WIP: 70-680
  10. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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  11. zxspectrum

    zxspectrum Gigabyte Poster Premium Member

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    Cheers for that Sparky, ill have a look now
     
    Certifications: BSc computing and information systems
    WIP: 70-680
  12. zxspectrum

    zxspectrum Gigabyte Poster Premium Member

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    right ive had a re write and i think im getting there, i hope you dont mind looking over it for me

    Introduction:
    When you are looking for a certain piece of information on the internet, even though to the naked eye this is a simple task, in reality this is not the case. There are billions of pages on the web and you would use a search engine for when you are looking for something specific. This is where logical operators are very useful. Logical operators are words such as AND, OR and NOT. I have chosen these words to use for my example.

    Using a simple search, by typing just one word can be quiet simple, but when you use a lot of words the query is a lot more complex. This is where Boolean operators are involved (logical operators are generally derived from Boolean algebra) and they allow you to refine and extend the terms of your search. Three examples are as follows:
    www.howstuffworks.com

    • AND: All the terms joined by "AND" must appear in the pages or documents. Some search engines substitute the operator "+" for the word AND.
    • OR: At least one of the terms joined by "OR" must appear in the pages or documents.
    • NOT: The term or terms following "NOT" must not appear in the pages or documents. Some search engines substitute the operator "-" for the word NOT.
    www.howstuffworks.com

    Conclusion:
    Logical operators compare logical values, these return values of true or false. These operators are what make your search more refined and give you back a more productive outcome as a result of the web pages they deliver.
     
    Certifications: BSc computing and information systems
    WIP: 70-680
  13. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    I would say that is a huge improvement!

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
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  14. zxspectrum

    zxspectrum Gigabyte Poster Premium Member

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    Well feel free to take some credit there Harry, i even used some of the stuff you said , but i did re arrange it a tad . Would you believe that this is only part of an access course so i can get into UNI etc

    Thanks for all your help

    PS do you want me to reference you , lol
     
    Certifications: BSc computing and information systems
    WIP: 70-680
  15. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    No probs - this is what this place is about! :biggrin

    No need. <grin>

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+

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