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Linux virgin

Discussion in 'Linux / Unix Discussion' started by Rostros22, Oct 26, 2005.

  1. Rostros22

    Rostros22 Kilobyte Poster

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    Hi

    I have never used linux before and seeing as I have built myself a test lab I wanted to 'have a look' so to speak.

    A friend at work uses mandrake and seems to be ok with it. I am going to look at ubuntu as Mr Boyce on here displays it! And I hear there is one that 'looks and feels' like windows.

    Could anybody suggest what I should start with to get a feel for the linux environment?

    Many thanks
     
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  2. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Hi,

    I am by no means a Linux tutor of any flavour but since Phoenix recommended Ubuntu i haven't booted into XP since! :)

    I think it is well worth learning and teaches you about computing rather than just wizards like in Windows.

    I suggest you dual boot your current set-up. That way you can always play when you want to. :biggrin

    Don't forget there is a Live CD which you can play with and won't touch your hard drive.
     
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  3. Rostros22

    Rostros22 Kilobyte Poster

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    Thanks - I was going down the dual boot option but just didn't know if there was a major difference bewteen all the versions out there?

    I have been told, as you have said boyce, that linux will 'wake' you up to your machine. :biggrin

    As I said I have never used it so just wanted some input really. I have booted a live cd before and basically looked at it, rebooted and went into windows again! :oops:
     
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  4. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    If you are going to use a Live CD I'd recommend going with Knoppix. It's by far the best Live CD OS going. It has the best hardware detection is the "fastest" of all the Live CD's when being run.

    As to wanting to try out the most "Windows-like" of the Linux distributions, I think that is a large mistake. Linux isn't Windows. Don't go into thinking it is, or wanting it to be like Windows. This will only confuse you in the end and make it harder to actually learn Linux. Also, some of the Linux Os's like Linspire actually make every one who uses the computer "root". This is a huge security hole and violates the very basic premises Linux is built on.

    Root is the same as Administrator on a Windows computer.
     
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  5. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Freddy and Phoenix are the Linux gurus here. Keep an eye on their responses and you'll learn a lot. I agree with Boyce...probably a live CD will be the easiest way to get a feel for Linux. You can download the ISO files for free depending on the exact distro you want to you.

    You can also kill two birds with one stone and buy a Linux book that contains a distro on disk. Many include Live CDs as well so you can read and play without touching your Windows machine's configuration.
     
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  6. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    I personally think Linux is the way to go. Ok, Windows is the majority player by far (for how long?) but Linux has so much to offer.
    One machine for Pro is say £100 plus programs, anti-virus, spyware, etc......

    Linux is free (some flavours) and teaches you more about computing.
    For me it is Linux all the way. :biggrin

    In my opinion, stick with it, keep your dual boot like me and learn.

    regards
     
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  7. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    :oops: :oops: :oops:

    I'm no guru. I know some about Linux, but I'm far from being a Linux guru. Now, Phoenix, he's another case altogether. He's been using it for far longer than I have, and he has the advantage of using it in production enviroments. That is where a person really learns.
     
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  8. Rostros22

    Rostros22 Kilobyte Poster

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    I was told about linspire, should I avoid this then?

    Downloaded the ubuntu iso package tonight from their site and was going to dual boot one of my test machines with it.

    I might sound like a moron here but does it affect windows in anyway? I have no idea so just asking. It doesn't really matter as it is a test machine but if I installed it onto my 'proper' machine would it be a problem?

    Ta
     
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  9. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    In my opinon, Linspire is made as close to a user is used to Windows especially with their "CNR".
    I want to learn about computing which is why i followed up Ubuntu and haven't looked back.

    Don't be silly i heard the same things. As long as you partition it properly, i haven't discovered anything while having two OS as different as chalk and cheese on the same HD
     
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  10. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Will it affect your Windows machine? Depends. Do you have a spare partition just lying around on the hard drive of your Windows machine begging to have an OS installed on it?

    If not, you'll have to make room on your HDD so that you can dual boot. Also, usually its best to let the Linux boot loader manage the boot process. I think I posted some links awhile ago that talked about how to set up a dual Windows/Linux boot machine.

    Are you comfortable setting this up yourself? If not, don't be afraid to ask.
     
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  11. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    I did it the easy way.

    I had partitioned my laptop C: and D:
    C: was for Windows and all programs.
    D: was for data.
    I moved all the data to C: and pointed ubuntu to D:!

    It took care of the boot (grub) menu and viola! :biggrin
     
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  12. Rostros22

    Rostros22 Kilobyte Poster

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    I am comfortable doing it and definitely not afraid of making mistakes! Just wanted to learn more before I actually went ahead and did it. I have no problem partitioning my drive as it is already.

    Just thought I would ask you guys what you thought would be the best option for me being a novice at linux.

    I am sure I will have more questions in the future for you! :D
     
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  13. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    I would avoid Linspire like the plague, but then I'm a Debian guy. I like a computer that allows me to learn, is secure, and very stable. Linspire with their way of making everyone root is not secure and their wizards insulate you from your computer just like Windows does. I think it's a very poor choice. I mean, why pay for something that will actually keep you from learning? Isn't that why you wanted to install Linux in the first place?
     
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  14. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    You took the words out of my mouth. :biggrin
     
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  15. Rostros22

    Rostros22 Kilobyte Poster

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    That is the reason I wanted to learn yes, but I had no idea about the difference between them!

    I will go with ubuntu as I have that now and maybe experiment with others
     
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  16. Inqueision

    Inqueision Bit Poster

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    that makes two of us then....

    i got ubuntu last week installed it on my spare pc works fine apart from it not detecting my serial mouse?? even tried using a serial->ps/2 converter and nothing. (mayb my serial port has gone) so i cant use me mouse he he

    neway just downloading redhat today to see what that will be like and ive just read about suse 10 so when i see the iso for that i'll get it and play with it

    i dont know the difference between them all but i will find out from just installing it and using it.

    all i can say is just go for it and find out :)

    enjoy
     
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  17. moominboy

    moominboy Gigabyte Poster

    just a wee suggestion mate, if you downloaded ubuntu did you check the end result md5 checksum?

    i had a few problems with this as it was a dodgy download a few times.

    download freesum , which is a free utility to compare the sum values.

    http://www.shareup.com/FastSum-download-7531.html

    then just run the iso through it and compare the result to the check sum page on the ubuntu page.

    enjoy linux mate!
     
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  18. Dream_In_Infrared

    Dream_In_Infrared Nibble Poster

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    I have read this thread with interest. After hearing all sorts of positive comments about Linux over the years, and during my few months here, I decided to go and check out what all the fuss was about. After a few hours of reading various articles I am quite fired up about the prospect of using Linux. I visited the Ubuntulinux site and have placed an order for installation CDs. [I know I could have downloaded a copy but I am patient and have enough to do in the meantime].

    I extend a thank you to those here who have spoken so highly of Linux. I am really looking forward to trying this version and exploring something totally new.
     
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  19. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Dream- glad we could help :biggrin
     
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  20. Inqueision

    Inqueision Bit Poster

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    hey moomi cheers bud i did a checksum and it turns out to be different....

    so i'll try again after ive got these iso's of redhat.

    i it's always best to do a checksum after a download of a iso with linux?

    cheers guys
     
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