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linux stuff

Discussion in 'Software' started by zxspectrum, Nov 11, 2007.

  1. zxspectrum

    zxspectrum Gigabyte Poster Premium Member

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    Ive put wireshark on m laptop, which i am now uing to run fedora core7. I open the terminal and type in

    yum install wireshark wireshark - gnome . this then installs the program. What i cat do after tat is actually see the program where it is meant to be nor can i run it from the terminal, so what am i doing wrong ????

    Ed
     
    Certifications: BSc computing and information systems
    WIP: 70-680
  2. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Look under Internet on the Applications drop down menu. Wireshark, formerly known as Ethereal, is a gui program, not a text-based program. If you want a text-based sniffer try something like tcpdump.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  3. zxspectrum

    zxspectrum Gigabyte Poster Premium Member

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    Yeah ive tried that but its not there, ive tried all aver the placer to be honest, ???

    Ed
     
    Certifications: BSc computing and information systems
    WIP: 70-680
  4. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    1. It may not have installed correctly. Did you see any errors?

    Try running "which wireshark" from a bash prompt, to see if the executable is installed. If it is, then, as root, type that path in at the bash prompt and see what happens.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  5. zxspectrum

    zxspectrum Gigabyte Poster Premium Member

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    By thw way so you know im just starting iout on fedora so really im doing this all blind and picking itnup as i go along. I did what you said though and this is what i got

    [root@localhost ~]# which wireshark
    /usr/bin/which: no wireshark in (/usr/kerberos/sbin:/usr/kerberos/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/root/bin)
    [root@localhost ~]#

    Ed
     
    Certifications: BSc computing and information systems
    WIP: 70-680
  6. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    It looks as if it didn't install. Try, as root once again, "find / -name wireshark" and see what it brings up.

    To tell the truth these niggling little kinds of irritating problems are the reason I stick with Debian. Fedora, Ubuntu, LinuxMint, Sabayon, etc... and many other popular distros, try to put out a new release every 6 months. IMO, that's just nuts. There's just no way to put out a relatively bug-free distro in that amount of time. Development just moves so fast in the open source world that these distros are trying to keep pace with it at the expense of stability, reliability, and ultimately, security.

    If you want something that works, as advertised, use Debian, or something like CentOS. CentOS is based on RHEL(RedHat Enterprise Linux) so is much more stable, much more reliable, than Fedora. In Fedora you're using a development tool that RedHat has created. Fedora is their way of working of working the bugs out of their OS. Fedora users are, in fact, beta testers.

    Can you imagine how buggy a Windows release would be if MS put one out every six months?
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  7. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    One of the things I've noticed about yum is that even if it successfully downloads and installs a program, it may not create a menu item that allows you to launch it from the desktop. You can create a menu item manually, though it's kind of a pain.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  8. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    That is kind of a pain in Gnome, but creating a shortcut on the top panel is very easy. Just right click, choose Add to Panel, choose Custom Application Launcher. Then click on the Browse button, navigate to the executable(which you find using the command "which"), click on it, add the name of the program in the Name box, click on the little square to the left of it, and browse to the central pixelmaps directory, which in Debian is /usr/share/pixelmaps, and you'll normally find either "the" icon, or an icon you can use. Close the window, and your shortcut at the top exists in the icon it places there.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1

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