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LAN and Wireless at the same time?

Discussion in 'Networks' started by Miro, Sep 19, 2008.

  1. Miro

    Miro Byte Poster

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    I have got 2 PC's both connected wireless to router.Both have internet connection.
    Can I connect those 2 PC's by cable at the same time when they are conected by Wi-Fi?
    I have tried to do it but there is no connection.I have checked cross-over cable by tester and it is fine,
    both NICs works fine too-according to Hardware Manager.
     
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  2. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    why would you want them to connect via Wireless and Hardwired at the same time?
    also, i believe that this may cause conflict, due to both devices looking for an IP addy.
    its either one orr the another not both...
    unless of course you have 2 NIC per PC
     
  3. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Well he does MC, he has the wireless adapter and the Ethernet one = 2 :rolleyes:

    I haven't tried this kind of setup i admit but In theory it should work, using TCP/IP and APIPA. however, i'm just not sure how you're going about setting up the connectivity.

    Try using the 'network wizard' on each computer.
     
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  4. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    *hangs head in shame*
    [​IMG]
    think i should stick with posting pics
     
  5. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Im guessing its because the traffic through the two network cards wont route to the internet and therefore its routed to the wireless connection instead.

    Have you tried giving the network cards static IPs and then try to ping from one PC to the other.
     
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  6. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    I don't know for sure if it will work or not, but it could be that only one connection will have access to the internet and the other one might have only a LAN ip address.
     
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  7. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    I am not sure but surely if the NIC address is normal & the ethernet address is APIPA then it should work.
     
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  8. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

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    Miro,

    Questions:
    1. What operating system is on the first PC?
    2. What operating system is on the second PC?
     
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  9. albertc30

    albertc30 Kilobyte Poster

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    It does work as I had it once by mistake.
    I had my normal wired NIC and I plugged in a wireless card and had it installed and the connection was there.
    I would disable one or the other in turns and I had internet connectivity and they booth would connect to the routers DHCP and get a valid IP address and dns servers.
    So it does work, now either is beneficial or not, honestly I don't know.
     
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  10. Stoney

    Stoney Megabyte Poster

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    You can have both network interfaces connected to the same network at the same time.

    They will both get an IP by DHCP (if enabled).

    The way that windows works means that applications will only be bound to one interface by default. So although both interfaces have an IP and are functional, all network traffic will only go through the one interface.

    You could get around this if you change the routing table in Windows so that all internet traffic goes through one interface, and all sql traffic through the other, for example. I did look into this a while ago and never really found a solution. I think this because XP is not designed to act as a router, which is effectively what you are trying to do, by controlling what network traffic goes through each interface.

    If you have Windows server you can configure that as a router which should allow you to do this. But as a general rule XP will not let you operate 2 nic's independently of each other.

    HTH 8)
     
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  11. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    You most definately can. Our ops guys at work have their machines hardwired to the corporate network, and connected by wireless to another network in the building. They also have a script they run to route their internet traffic via the wireless network, whilst all other traffic (server access, etc) goes via the cable.

    No idea how they do it, but they do do it.
     
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  12. fortch

    fortch Kilobyte Poster

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    We have it for our people with laptops -- while on the dock, the LAN is active, but if they undock and go into the conference room, they still have network connection through our wireless system. Now, what I haven't tested is whether or not Windows provides any quantifiable way of utilizing the best interface -- like, if the LAN takes precedence once the lappy is back on the dock.
     
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  13. Miro

    Miro Byte Poster

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    Thanx everyone for help.I will try to play with those connection again.Now is weekend so:alc I am on a bit different network.
     
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  14. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Yes - it uses the standard 'metric' system. By default WiFi is considered poorer than Ethernet.

    Harry.
     
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  15. negseven

    negseven New Member

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    as Harry says its the metric that determines where traffic routes
    do a route print command at cmd prompt and you will see the metric

    Negseven
     
  16. Suttar

    Suttar Byte Poster

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    You can also define static routes on each machine, which is probably how the ops guys at Fergals work do it.
     
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  17. Miro

    Miro Byte Poster

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    As you said with the metric. I have made both Wi-Fi and wired work at the same time. And I need this cause I have 2 PC's conected by cable and 1 Laptop conected wirelles.
    However I have different issue now. One of the PC do not want share the files, hm...
     
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  18. Darkfunnyguy

    Darkfunnyguy Byte Poster

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    There will be no conflict so it will work by obtaining automatically or manually.
     
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