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Junior .net Developer And Pay Scale

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by momer79, Feb 23, 2010.

  1. momer79

    momer79 Bit Poster


    I work as junior software developer (.Net) in manchester and its been one and half yr since i started my job. Overall i am happy with working enviorment, people are nice and Cooperative. We have very small IT team and work on in house application.

    Sometimes its pretty boring as there is no work to do, i do ask my seniors if there is any work to do but they say that not at the moment, after asking few times, now i don't ask and wait for them to give me job to do. I am not wasting my time, in spare time i study for certification exams which are related to my job and career.

    1) Here i like to know if this is normal in all software development jobs that sometimes you get job to do and sometimes you are just sitting?

    2) How long should i wait before i ask my manager for salary increment? Last yr no one got 3% raise may be bcz of recession.

    3) How long normally it takes to progress from junior developer role to senior role?

  2. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

    It depends on the company... Eg. What jobs they have on, how they manage the staff, etc...

    3% raise? There's nothing stopping you from asking, whether or not you'll get it is a different thing. Things you have to consider: Can the company afford it? Have you taken on extra responsibilities? etc...

    Again depends on the company & what you do/done, etc... It may take someone a couple of months, it may take someone years, and some don't get that high...

    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  3. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

    1) Depends on the environment, and the demand for jobs to be done.

    2) That depends on your performance. If you feel you have exceeded your responsibilities, or are worth more than you are being paid, then by all means build and present your case (but be prepared with evidence. "Because I want one" wont cut it).

    3) Depends on ability. I would like to consider myself as reasonably skilled and competent, but I'm in no way a senior developer yet. I did get promoted from Developer to Analyst developer after a year in this particular job. Horses for Courses - I might take ten years, you might take 2. No way to tell.
    Certifications: ITIL Foundation; MCTS: Visual Studio Team Foundation Server 2010, Administration
    WIP: None at present
  4. volatile

    volatile Nibble Poster

    1) I am usually busy with something all the time:
    - Architecting/designing/prototyping future features
    - Researching new technologies or techniques we can apply in future builds
    - Implementing process improvements
    - Refactoring existing code
    - Depending on the phase I help out with integration, testing, documentation, etc.

    2) I wouldn't just go to your manager and ask for a raise. Have some things documented and researched. What was your yearly evaluation rating? Find out the average salary for your position and amount of experience and see where you fall. Have a list of things that you have done during your employment there that illustrate your contributions and how you've exceeded expectations.

    3) It all depends on your company and your abilities and initiative. I started at my company with no professional experience and then became the lead developer for my project within the first two years. I had to put a lot of effort into demonstrating my abilities, dedication, and passion. I was also one of the few people who constantly sought out to better the project and speak up if the managers/customers tried to push down things that did not make sense.

    Good luck to you.
    Certifications: Computer Science Degree, A+

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