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IT Prospects...

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by MaximS, Aug 6, 2008.

  1. MaximS

    MaximS New Member

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    ... Hi Guys,

    Can anyone advise me what might be the best option for me regarding to my cicuministances.

    I have done my MSc in E-Business in 2005, some graphic and web designing course in 2004.

    Currently im doing a lot of VBA for Excel (last 4 months for work related perpouses), but unfortunately thats not in IT (working s Stock Controller).

    I wondering what's the best moment to start looking for a job as junior VB programmer.

    Should I do some certifications first?? If yes which ones, where (pay for expensive course like Computeach or just buying a good book and going on exam).


    Thanks in advance for any advice.
     
  2. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Start looking now and get some books and software and study on your own or at a college. There is no need to pay thousands to a place like computeach when you can do it for less than £100
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  3. MaximS

    MaximS New Member

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    Any recomendations about certifications to take?? And books ??
     
  4. postman

    postman Byte Poster

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    You should go for A+ cert (Mike Meyers AIO here http://tinyurl.com/6b2yku )this is a good start then you can start on the MS certs.
     
    WIP: A+
  5. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    I disagree. While the A+ is great for a techie who wants to get into IT administration, it isn't terribly useful for a programmer.

    I'd recommend learning how to program (through self-study, of course!) and building a portfolio of code that you can show to potential employers.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  6. MaximS

    MaximS New Member

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    Any other certificates good to do before attempting for MCAD??

    I'm currently thinking about going deeper in VBA (maybe VB.NET) and I am training a lot recently (like 20 hours a week). If you know any book worthy to read just let me know.
     
  7. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Not to my knowledge... a programmer's a programmer, and a tech's a tech. Rarely do the two cross paths.

    I'm no programmer, so I can't help much (last thing I programmed was in BASIC for a national contest in '86). But there are several competent programmers here who I expect will chime in. I'll ping my buddy Josh.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  8. BosonJosh

    BosonJosh Gigabyte Poster

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    If you're looking to get a job as a programmer, I'd definitely start moving towards VB.NET. One decision you'll need to make at some point is whether you want to focus on desktop or Web applications. Many people do both, but you'll be better able to focus your studies if you pick one or the other to learn one you move past the basics. However, at first you should just spend some time learning the basics of the language.

    To that end, I'd probably recommend MS Press books. They aren't always the best, but they usually are pretty good. This is one I'd recommend since you're just getting started: link. This book by Wrox Press would also be a good starting point. I find Wrox books to be a little scattered, but they are packed full of information.
     
  9. MaximS

    MaximS New Member

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    Thanks guys,

    After reading your post my conclusion is staying with my current job (maybe is not IT but is letting me to train a lot with VBA at work), programming wherever possible (already registered with ozgrid.com - reading a lot and solving other's problems) and buying some books to step into VB.NET (I'm opting for desktop rather than web) and preparing myself for first MCDA exams (possibly will do the new ones after march 2009).
     

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