Is it worth doing a masters degree?

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by fatp, Jun 7, 2008.

  1. fatp

    fatp Byte Poster

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    I have graduated in computer science last year and am currently working in I.T support as an technician. I enjoy workin in I.T but not really the support, i.e. desktop / network admin side of I.T.

    I am thinking about doing a information systems masters as I want to work as an database administrator in the database management /admin field. Is it worth doing or should I just go for the mcdba? I have a fairly good working knowledge of databse principles but not the practical commerical work experience...

    I know the nothing beats experience (hell, this fact has been drilled in by almost all the members of the forum) but every1 has to start somewhere!

    Fat P :)
     
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  2. Adam Banner

    Adam Banner Poster Galore

     
  3. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    You could do the MCDBA and get a job in database development to get the experience whilst you are studying for it. Try looking for a trainee DBA job.

    You could probably do a part time masters degree too.
     
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  4. zimbo
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    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    This website might help you to find exactly the M.Sc what you looking for - IMO there is no point doing a "general masters" like Information Technology etc - specialize in something and my advice is try and be unique so you can stick out in the crowd when applying for jobs. I used the keyword "database" so feel free to try others

    Link
     
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  5. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    You don't need a masters to be a DBA. A masters degree won't be that useful unless you're going into IT management or starting your own IT company.
     
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  6. wagnerk
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    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    I agree with that, I haven't seen any IT jobs below management level requiring a Master's degree. However a few IT management jobs that I have requested application packs for have listed a Postgraduate qualification as an essential.

    I/employers say postgraduate as the Master's degree is only 1 form of postgraduate qualifications and employers know that, other postgraduate quals include the: NVQ5, Phd, MCGI, etc...

    -Ken

    Ref 1
     
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  7. derkit

    derkit Gigabyte Poster

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    Thanks for the links Ken - and zimbo - I've always considered doing a Masters and have always felt about leaving it until I was more at the management stage, and what the two of you have said have just confirmed that.

    To fatp - if I were in your shoes, learn the job/process from the ground up - even though it may seem trivial, it will stand you in good stead - also few will employ you for a "Masters-level role" with just your Masters alone.
     
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  8. Jiser

    Jiser Kilobyte Poster

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    Bit about my cousin here in relevance to masters. He left school with few qualifications (much like Sir.Alans new apprentice on 100k - for those in the U.K.). He excelled in his roles (not directly related to I.T. but more telecoms). He had to do an MBA to further advance before he took a top role recently in Apple in london on a nice figure above 80k with bonus.

    So it appears it can be quite useful in later life! Not nessarily in earlier!
     
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  9. sunn

    sunn Gigabyte Poster

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    What role did your cousin take with Apple (i.e. Sr. Management; Engineer; Analyst; PM; etc...)? From what I've seen the MBA won't necessarily come into play in a technical role (especially when starting a career). However there are 2 instances when a MBA may provide an advantage:
    1 - A Sr. role where decisions are more business related. (i.e. CxO; Director; Sr. Manager; etc)
    2 - An individual that is being groomed to take on more responsibilities

    About #2
    Many execs plan for the future and in doing so identify people to for future Sr. roles. So a person in a technical role with higher education (e.g. Masters; PhD; Exec training...) has a better chance to get into the planning stage. Saying that, it's usually based more on personal relationships first and credentials second.

    To answer the OP - where do you want you career to go? If DBA or DB Mgmt is where you see your career getting to, I'd suggest learning those technologies specifically, and maybe consider your MBA at a later time.
     
  10. Jiser

    Jiser Kilobyte Poster

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    It was for a role before apple he needed to further his education. He is in more of a business side role than technical. I think hes actually carrier management in europe.

    I agree masters are useful in later life for those higher level jobs.
     
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  11. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Again, as Jiser mentioned, that's stuff that will help you later in an IT career... not early on. In truth, a Masters can work against you much like the CCNA can when applying for entry-level positions... employers will think "overqualified", "too expensive", and/or "will leave in 6 months for something better".
     
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  12. fatp

    fatp Byte Poster

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    thanks for the feedback guys.

    sent my application off yesterday... will let you know how i get on...

    fatp. :)
     
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  13. UKDarkstar
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    UKDarkstar Terabyte Poster

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    Just to add, I started a Masters in Information Systems Management a few years back but had to drop out after the first term due to work/financial reasons.

    The course was run at Bournemouth University under the auspices of their International Business School.

    I would make the following observations :

    1) I was very disappointed at the extremely high numbers of foreign students (presumably brought in as the fees they paid were good) - this is not to say I was in any way prejudiced but it was extremely annoying to find seminars on English rather than the course topics and it did slow everyone down

    2) possibly due to the above, but I felt that the level of education during the first term was equivalent to first year degree when I was expecting something a bit more demanding

    3) great emphasis on submitting academic papers

    Now, given that I am currently job hunting (you can read my background in the new members bit) I do perhaps regret not finishing the course. However, on reflecting back I should, perhaps, have investigated the course a little more.

    So, I'm not saying don't do a Masters but if you do, research the course very carefully and make sure it covers what you want.
     
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  14. Jiser

    Jiser Kilobyte Poster

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    Yeh Bournemouth uni is complete sh*te. Just finished my degree there. The whole course was a complete waste of time to the stage where I cannot be bothered to describe it.
     
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  15. derkit

    derkit Gigabyte Poster

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    It was exactly the same at my uni in Bath - all the IT Masters degrees were made up of 80% "international" students and why? Home/EU students £9k fees, international £20k fees.

    (as some of the lecturers were my tutors I know that is definitely the uni's motivation)
     
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  16. UKDarkstar
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    UKDarkstar Terabyte Poster

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    I wouldn't describe the Uni as that. My degree was from there too and I had no problems with them. I do think courses and sites vary a lot and, particularly at masters level, I think it is worth a fair bit of investigation.
     
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