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Is it imperative to memorize all cable/line types, speed, distance, etc?

Discussion in 'Network+' started by sendalot, Dec 14, 2012.

  1. sendalot

    sendalot Nibble Poster

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    Is it imperative to memorize all cable/line types, speed, distance, etc?

    Like 10Base, 100Base, LX, SX, TX, etc
     
    WIP: A+
  2. shadowwebs

    shadowwebs Megabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    it all depends on the exam that you are going to be taking and the chances of it coming up is anyone guess really
     
    Certifications: compTIA A+, Apple Certified Technical Coordinator 10.10 (OS X Yosemite, Server and Support)
  3. sendalot

    sendalot Nibble Poster

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    Talking about Network+.

    Thanks.
     
    WIP: A+
  4. The Zig

    The Zig Kilobyte Poster Forum Leader

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    To be honest, I've passed it and I haven't memorised all of them. It's a judgement call, but I've always found I can avoid having to cram lots into memory by knowing roughly what the different bits mean. This helps to make an educated guess. I prefer to study smart, and don't tend to sink a LOT of time into something that's only likely to come up in a few questions.

    For example look at 100 base T.

    Speed's easy, as it's just the first number (e.g. 100 = 100Mbps). Only thing to watch out for is that this is in mega-BITS (notice the small 'b'). So if you're asked about speed in BYTES (which uses an upper-case 'B') you'll need to divide (or multiply) by 8 (8 bits = 1 byte).

    Cable type and distance isn't too bad either. TX, or T-whatever is for Twisted Pair cable, (UTP or STP); these are the ones you see almost everywhere and nearly all of them have a 100 metre distance limit. And they all use RJ45 connectors.
    I think coax for Ethernet has basically dropped off the exam, meaning that if it's not a BaseT-something, it'll likely be fibre (base F, S, L or E-something)

    Fibre is painfully non-standardised. The idea I use is:-
    S is for Short-ish range, a few hundred metres. Usually these use multi-modal light (i.e. normal light from LEDs rather than lasers), and basically, this kind of 'dirty' light disperses over distance, limiting the range.
    L is for Longer range. This is where we start moving into kilometres - I think around 2-10km-ish. This is also where we start using the 'cleaner' (single-mode) light from lasers.
    E is for Extreme! These go up to like 40km.

    Anything else I'd have to guess! This is just a rule of thumb, mind. There's a LOT of variation with fibre. But at least this might help you make an educated guess if you get a question or two on it. Personally I wouldn't waste hours on memorising it all.
    Also, if you do need to memorise things have a look at my post about Mnemosyne; that might help you do it more time effectively.
     
    Certifications: A+; Network+; Security+, CTT+; MCDST; 4 x MTA (Networking, OS, Security & Server); MCITP - Enterprise Desktop Support; MCITP - Enterprise Desktop Administrator; MCITP - Server Administrator; MCSA - Server 2008; MCT; IOSH; CCENT
    WIP: CCNA; Server 2012; LPIC; JNCIA?
  5. sendalot

    sendalot Nibble Poster

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    Oh wow, thank you very much sir.

    Can't believe you are handing these out for free.

    If I pass, you will be recognized.
     
    WIP: A+
  6. The Zig

    The Zig Kilobyte Poster Forum Leader

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    No problem. Good luck with the exam.
     
    Certifications: A+; Network+; Security+, CTT+; MCDST; 4 x MTA (Networking, OS, Security & Server); MCITP - Enterprise Desktop Support; MCITP - Enterprise Desktop Administrator; MCITP - Server Administrator; MCSA - Server 2008; MCT; IOSH; CCENT
    WIP: CCNA; Server 2012; LPIC; JNCIA?
  7. soundian

    soundian Gigabyte Poster

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    I think this is exactly the right approach for the A+ and Network+. I'm sure they have a way of giving a balanced set of questions, so it's unlikely you'll get many 'obscure' questions. Also, most questions are fairly easy to narrow down to 2 options if you've covered the topics well enough, even if you haven't memorised absolutely everything.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+,MCDST,MCTS(680), MCP(270, 271, 272), ITILv3F, CCENT
    WIP: Knuckling down at my new job
  8. barrixrock

    barrixrock Bit Poster

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    N+ Certification expired?
     
    Certifications: A+, MS 70-680
    WIP: MS 70-640

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