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Problem IP Settings (VMware DC)

Discussion in 'Networks' started by westernkings, Sep 19, 2009.

  1. westernkings

    westernkings Gigabyte Poster

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    Hi guys, I am truely not getting this whole thing right now; and no amount of googling my ass off is making it any clearer.

    Basically, all I am trying to do is create a Domain Controller with VMware Workstation that I have just bought, in the hope to learn how to replicate said DC onto a second backup DC.

    I just can't grasp what the IP Setup of it is supposed to be.

    When I initially installed R2, I could get internet access, but I don't know IPv4 settings i am supposed to give the adapter as the host PC receives it's IP address from a wireless Router.

    Has someone got a cretins guide anywhere for this?

    I am looking to setup this DC so that it has an ip address of 10.1.1.10 but can also get internet access. I haven't the foggiest, and I know this is a daft question.
     
    Certifications: MCITP:VA, MCITP:EA, MCDST, MCTS, MCITP:EST7, MCITP:SA, PRINCE2, ITILv3
  2. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    the easiest way to do this would be to add a second network card to your DC. set the first one to be bridged networing, so that it picks up it's IP from your wireless router. on the second NIC set it to use the address range you want to use.

    Although this may work, I have had problems in the past doing similar stuff.

    Just a query though - why do you still need your vm's to access the web? I find that for lab work simply have all of your vm's set to local only networking, so that they can communicate only with themselves.
     
  3. Shinigami

    Shinigami Megabyte Poster

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    I guess your desktop might current be connected to the internet via a router of some sort. That router may, or may not be giving the desktop an address via DHCP, but as long as the desktop is able to speak to the router gateway, your desktop will have internet access.

    Now, if you make a guest VM, and you give this machine an IP in a subnet which is NOT the same as your router or host, there will be problems with it communicating with the "internet".

    Many routers these days have an IP address like 192.168.1.1. This often means that their subnet is set to 255.255.255.0. In addition, these routers perform routing duties and DNS, meaning that you need to set the Gateway and DNS settings to point to this router as well if you've set a static IP address on your host machine. The primary IP of the host machine may be a number such as 192.168.1.2 or 192.168.1.100, etc... in other words, it's the final bit which changes value.

    With this in mind, if your guest VM is running a single NIC and you've configured it to run in an IP range of 10.x.x.x, then this VM can't route to the host machine as it's in a subnet of its own.

    You could proceed by setting the IP to be in the same subnet as the host and router, configure the Primary DNS to point to itself and a secondary one to point to your router DNS, or alternatively, add a forwarder to the DNS settings on this DC, so that it forwards other queries to 192.168.1.1 (don't forget the subnet and gateway).

    The important part about what I'm saying above, is that unless you've got a proper understanding of networking, you may have some difficulties getting these machines to speak to each other.

    Post the IP configuration of your host machine and we can give you additional pointers on what to do next.

    But if you really wanna use the IP of 10.1.1.10, then you need to configure some routing somewhere, either using the VMWare host itself or a switch/router that can perform subnetting, in a manner that enables your machine to speak with the other subnet from the current one you've configured.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2009
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, MCDST, MOS, CIW, Comptia
    WIP: Win7/Lync2010/MCM
  4. DC Pr0Mo

    DC Pr0Mo Kilobyte Poster

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    Two easy options
    1. Set the router dhcp scope to the same network as the the domain controller
    2. Change the IP settings on the domain controller back the same scope as the router (im assuming it's in the 192 range)

    The problem is your router and domain controller are on different networks.
     
    Certifications: MCDST | BSc Network Computing
    WIP: 70-291 | 70-293 | 70-294 | 70-297
  5. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Routing and Remote Access (RRAS) 8)
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2009
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  6. Shinigami

    Shinigami Megabyte Poster

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    He'll need a second machine for a proper RRAS setup. If he's already stuck at this, he's not going to get RRAS setup in a jiffy.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, MCDST, MOS, CIW, Comptia
    WIP: Win7/Lync2010/MCM
  7. westernkings

    westernkings Gigabyte Poster

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    Just assigned the DC01 a static 10.1.1.10 IP Address through my Router Configuration, so that's all working now. Now it is just a case of making sure all machines attached to the domain recieve their IP address through the DC01 whilst maintaining Internet access? I assume they would be accessing it through the DC?
     
    Certifications: MCITP:VA, MCITP:EA, MCDST, MCTS, MCITP:EST7, MCITP:SA, PRINCE2, ITILv3
  8. Shinigami

    Shinigami Megabyte Poster

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    The machines in your domain would get their IP addresses from a DHCP server. That service could be hosted by your router, or by your DC, or by another member server.

    Unless you do some form of Internet Connection Sharing on your DC, your clients would not necessarily get to the internet "through" your Domain Controller, they just need to be able to speak to a gateway, which in turn routes their internet traffic through itself, but you can have your clients use the DC for name resolution as long as the DC is configured to route DNS requests it itself cannot answer, to some other device (such as the router, which in turn would router the question to a name server on the internet).

    What is the study material you're using to aid you in doing these labs?
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, MCDST, MOS, CIW, Comptia
    WIP: Win7/Lync2010/MCM
  9. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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    WIP: Nada
  10. dazza786

    dazza786 Megabyte Poster

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    want a water mate?:biggrin
     
    Certifications: MCP (271, 272, 270, 290, 291, 621, 681, 685), MCDST, MCTS, MCITP, MCSA, Security+, CCA(XA6.5)
  11. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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    The cough was genuine mate, I feel rotten at the moment! :)
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCP, MCDST, MCSA 2K3, MCTS, MOS, MTA, MCT, MCITP:EDST7, MCSA W7, Citrix CCA, ITIL Foundation
    WIP: Nada
  12. Shinigami

    Shinigami Megabyte Poster

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    Want some fries with that :D

    Want some Cheese with that Whine of yours :wink:

    etc... etc...

    Just kidding. But I AM interested in knowing what study material this guy is using, from sounds of it, he might be skipping some chapters, or the study material isn't quite the kind that he needs. But you never know *shrug*
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, MCDST, MOS, CIW, Comptia
    WIP: Win7/Lync2010/MCM
  13. dazza786

    dazza786 Megabyte Poster

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    well being fair... i dont recall vmware being a topic on either exam regarding 2k3/ad :rolleyes:

    it took me a while to get my old lab working with vmware/virtualsun/virtualisation software when i first started
     
    Certifications: MCP (271, 272, 270, 290, 291, 621, 681, 685), MCDST, MCTS, MCITP, MCSA, Security+, CCA(XA6.5)
  14. DC Pr0Mo

    DC Pr0Mo Kilobyte Poster

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    His problem is with his network settings, not vmware.
     
    Certifications: MCDST | BSc Network Computing
    WIP: 70-291 | 70-293 | 70-294 | 70-297
  15. Shinigami

    Shinigami Megabyte Poster

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    Yeah, the VMWare shouldn't be the issue here. I had a GSX setup running no problem on my first try. But if you lack in IP routing skills, setting up a DC environment as your first lab might mean that you're moving a tad too quick.

    Some study material takes you in gently, others throw you in the deep end. We all respond differently to these guides and whichever one is trying to teach the OP to setup a Domain environment without first explaining the A to Z of subnetting, might not the most helpful one to be working with.

    Just my two cents, no offence.

    Admittedly I haven't searched the OP's previous posts to be able to gauge his skill set, so I can only speculate on what he is using to help him build his lab, and what his general understanding is when it comes to network environment. We all start from somewhere.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2009
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, MCDST, MOS, CIW, Comptia
    WIP: Win7/Lync2010/MCM

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