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IP address

Discussion in 'Networks' started by Raffaz, Feb 17, 2007.

  1. Raffaz

    Raffaz Kebab Lover Gold Member

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    Ive always known ip addresses to be like this format 192.168.x.x, just seen one in this format ipaddress : fe80::218:deff:fea4:34c5%4. What is it? Probably something simple, but ive never seen them like this before.
     
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  2. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

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    Raffaz,

    IP addresses expressed using letters 'a' through 'f' therefore hexadecimal are IPv6 or "Internet Protocol Version 6" addresses. For the sake of completeness, IP addresses like 192.168.x.x are in IPv4 or "Internet Protocol Version 4" format.

    I hope this helps.
     
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  3. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

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    Yes it as rh lee says, its in IPv6 format using hexadecimal and 128 bit addresses instead of 32 bit addresses.

    If I remember correctly :: means that in that part of the address there are whole load of zeros which can be taken out to make the notation shorter.

    Edit: I must remember to refer to the correct person!!!
     
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  4. Raffaz

    Raffaz Kebab Lover Gold Member

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    Cheers for the confirmation, i had a feeling it was IPv6 but ive never seen it so wasnt sure. :) Are there compatability issues between a computer running IPv6 and 4? Eg if a computer was setup with IPv4 and it tried to connect to a computer with IPv6 would it fail? What kind of error would you get if they do fail? Cheers
     
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  5. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    and how yould you ping this address fe80::218:deff:fea4:34c5%4 like normal or something else
     
  6. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

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    I think you would ping it as normal.
     
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  7. Baba O'Riley

    Baba O'Riley Gigabyte Poster

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    No, IPv6 is totally backwards compatible with IPv4. Without referring to a book, I think an IPv4 address is just given a load of leading zeroes to make it look like an IPv6 address. There is a chunk on v6 addresses reserved for this purpose.
     
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  8. Mitzs
    Honorary Member

    Mitzs Ducktape Goddess

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  9. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    The reason for the change to IPv6 is explained in the first of Mitzs's links..

     
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  10. Sandy

    Sandy Ex-Member

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    And you thought IPv4 was hard to learn!
     
  11. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    "but IPv6 is still not fully developed and is not yet a standard. "

    IPV6 is being issued by some providers now.
     
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  12. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    As far as i am aware, ipv6 was ratified quite a while ago
    ICANN has already allocated blocks to the regional internet registries (back in 1999!)

    whilst there is still work extending and expanding the protocol, as well as improving migration and interoperability

    i could be wrong, and i cant find a definitative defined standard listing anywhere, not even for v4 and ive checked IETF, IEEE and ISO, oh well

    btw
    the :: in the address tells the computer to replace that with a string of zeros to make up the full 128bit value, hence why your address is so short, you can also replace the leading zeros of a block, but only the leading zeros
    not sure why there is a % in it either, i dont recall that being a HEX character ;)

    fe80::218:deff:fea4:34c5 (i imagine is the actual address)
    fe80:0000:0000:0000:0218:deff:fea4:34c5 would be the full address
    fe80 signifies its a link local address, much like the 169 AINA addresses that you get
    2001: is the starting block of a normal address
    ::1 is the ipv6 loopback address
     
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