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Internet history

Discussion in 'Internet, Connectivity and Communications' started by tripwire45, Feb 3, 2004.

  1. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    I've been looking into some of the history of the Internet and I know that before anybody ever heard of a web browser, many university computer systems were connected by the early Internet. Were all those transactions conducted on the command line or was there some other kind of interface? Thanks.
     
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  2. Phil
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    Phil Gigabyte Poster

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    This is just guess work but before html came along and with slower network speeds I would have thought it ran more like the old BBS systems, all text based. At school we had a computer connected to a system with a 300bps modem, we used to sit and watch the screens build character at a time :)
     
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  3. Phoenix
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    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    back in the days of the ARPANet (c1969) alot of the software was inhouse, propietory to the university and military networks, so yes there was software to make use of it, also unix utils like chat and rshell etc were used
    by the time the internet started to get a public following (geeks mainly) the BBS system was used more heavily, and then eventualy the WWW was developed by some english dude, that became the de facto around the mid 90s, early 90s were still BBS years if i recall correctly, www existed, but there wasnt much out there that utilised it
    and the rest as they say
    is history
     
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  4. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    When I asked this question on another forum, I got an interesting response from a man I call "The Master of Links". He can find at least one Internet source for any technical question you'd care to pose. Fidonet
     
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  5. dreec

    dreec Nibble Poster

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    Tim Berners Lee - working for CERN, some Swiss organisation. Tim developed HTTP and HTML, which lead to the WWW. Currently works at MIT as head of W3C (which he also founded)

    For the record, and it's great to upset the Americans!!. It was the BRITISH who 'invented' the Internet. It was the Physics Research LAb, or something like that, which managed to get the first 2 computers talking to each other. OK they were under contract to the US DoD which is why ARPANet is widely considered to be the first network.

    Other firsts include

    Robert Tappan Morris - He created the first ever worm, using backdoors in UNIX. (November 2nd 1988). It was written as an exercise to see what could happen. The son of a NASA computer specilist he was eventually fined $10,000, 3 yrs probation and 400 hours of community service

    Datastream Cowboy - 16 year old UK hacker who persistently broke into MILNET sites. Led to the setting up of Air Force Office of Investigations (AFOI) was eventually caught in May 1994. He was hacking through exploration rather than malicious intent and found MILNET sites more challenging than EDU.

    Richard Stallman - wrote the 'emacs' editing software in 1976. Founded GNU (GNU's not Unix) project

    Phil Zimmerman - Developed PGP encyption

    And my personal favorite, the guy who developed and wrote WinZip.

    Unfortunately I cannot remember his name but died a couple of years ago after developing scirosis of the liver! Now thats the way to do it!!
     
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  6. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

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    Slightly off topic but a rider fron Dreec post. Cern are based in Switzerland and currently run the largest particle accelerator in the world. It's all about accelorating particles and colliding them into each other to see what happens (I think).

    I think at one time they actually proved the existance of antimatter.

    Here's The Link to their site.

    They do advertise the site as "where the web was born"
     
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  7. dreec

    dreec Nibble Poster

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    Thanks for that AJ

    If I remember correctly there was an article stating that CERN had theoritcally proved the existence of anti-matter but it would not remain stable long enough for it to be recorded (a fraction of a nano-second I think). Geez... It's been a long time since I got involved with astrophysics, particle physics and the ilk. Found it incrediblely dull and decided the good stuff was not worth the time and effort. Although must admit I have been strangly drawn back to it recently!
     
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  8. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    That's one of those areas that I cannot quite work out why I'm fascinated by something that freaks my brain, but still continue to love it.

    Shame the same didn't apply to studying for MS certs, etc :roll:

    :?: :!: :?: :idea:
     
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  9. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    Aye that'll be a black hole I say, keep your eyes on the horizon people
    :what?
     
  10. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    There are no horizons in space, Flex - thats the catch. At this point we have to think outside of the box.

    Normal proportions and dimensions do not apply - this place is where infinity meets singularity, where everything is all or nothing. A point where infinite energy has zero mass. Where all points accelerate away from each other at equally increasing speed. Red shifts and blue shifts interject rudely. I could even be the reason why I never met my grandfather

    Could this finally be the place where my sig is finally explained ? There's the question....
     
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  11. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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  12. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

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    Just watch Star Trek. Explains it all.

    Live long and prosper. :borgsmile
     
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  13. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    I think this statement is all about the wording, as it should be lol, stupid thing to say :D
    The unstoppable force will continue, because it's unstoppable.
    The statement doesn't say that the force is pushing against the immovable object, or of the unstoppable force is swirling around, or whatever, it is but a force.

    I could go on a bit, but I won't bore you to tears.Anyway thats my explanation, they both continue to be immovable and unstoppable.
     
  14. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

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    In space no one can hear you scream.
     
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  15. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Thats the closest anyone's come yet, Flex .......


    The Force is assumed to be upon the object, which is assumed to also be unstoppable :?: :arrow: :arrow: :arrow:
     
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  16. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    Glad I sorted it, I had to before I could sleep last night.It just played on my mind once you had put out the challenge.

    I'm sad like that :D
     
  17. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Didn't say that was the answer Flex - just close ..... :wink:
     
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  18. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    How can I give a specific answer when I don't know the specific forces at work, what the object is made of etc etc.
    Under what conditions would this be tested in.I'll have more of a think but at the moment the question seems too vague for a specific answer.
     
  19. SimonV

    SimonV Petabyte Poster Administrator

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    I would say that the unstoppable force should bounce off the immovable object and continue traveling, just in a different direction, thus keeping both objects immovable and unstoppable respectively.
     
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  20. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    When I started this thread, I had no idea it would take a left-hand turn into the Twilight Zone. The discussion on that particular end product of a decaying star (black holes) reminds me of a series of astronomy classes I took the first time I was an undergrad. This was decades ago so anything I learned is waaaaaay out of date.

    I became interested in cosmology for awhile (study of the origin of the universe). Seems that in addition to the Big Bang theory and the Solid State theory, there was a little known theory put forth by a Swedish scientist whose name escapes me called Matter-AntiMatter cosmology. Seems that matter and antimatter was created together at the instant of the "big bang" and coexist in the universe. The fellow put forth that individual galaxies could be matter and antimatter or that matter and antimatter stars could co-exist in the same galaxy (but not too near each other for obvious reasons). You couldn't tell by looking because light (or photons if you prefer) is its own antiparticle.

    That's about all I remember. There was only one book on the subject in the school library and it was only about 100 pages long. Oh...I got an A on my paper. :D
     
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