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Installing OpenOffice.org 2.0 for Debian

Discussion in 'Linux / Unix Discussion' started by tripwire45, Nov 9, 2005.

  1. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Hey! I did it. Ok, the directions were pretty easy, but for a Linux newbie like me, it's still a thrill to make something work. Now I've got OOov2 on my Debian box at work. Try this Link
     
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  2. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Wow. You sure do things the hard way, Trip. I just used apt-get.... :twisted:
     
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  3. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    So did I, but I kept getting a message saying that I had the latest version which was 1.1.3. I figured OOov2 wasn't available as a .deb package yet and when I saw this article, I decided "what the heck". Wasn't all *that* hard. :wink:
     
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  4. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    LOL. I understand.

    If you use apt-pinning and a combination of sarge and sid you can install OO 2 using apt-get, as it and all its dependencies are now in the database.

    You have to add unstable to your /etc/apt/sources.list file. Then create an /etc/apt/preferences file. Run apt-get update, and then just run apt-get install -t unstable openoffice.org2 and apt will figure out what all needs to change, and install OO 2 and make all the system changes needed.
     
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  5. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    LOL. I think my way was easier, Freddy. :blink :tongue
     
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  6. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Well, there are a couple of things that happen when you install software the way you did.

    1. It does not exist in the apt or dpkg database.

    2. You cannot update it using apt because it doesn't exist in the apt database so any security updates or changes to it will have to come from you manually updating the package.

    3. You cannot uninstall it using apt-get or dpkg because neither knows it exists on your computer.

    4. If you unistall OO you will have to do so manually and make sure you manually delete all related files and dependencies.

    The way I did it takes maybe 5 or 10 minutes of configuration changes the first time apt-pinning is set up, and then everything is done automatically after that.
     
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  7. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    I humbly abase myself in your masterful presence. :oops:

    You da man, Freddy. :)
     
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  8. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Oh, for Pete's sake. Lighten up will you! I'm far from being "masterful" in Debian. I may have been at this longer than you have, but I have a long, long way to go to really be good at this. I am your fellow-learner.
     
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  9. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    It was a joke. :rolleyes:
     
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  10. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    OK. Sorry. I'm just really sensitive about this as I know how much I have to learn, and just how far I have to go. I really don't want anyone thinking I'm some type of Linux guru because I'm not. I know a few things, but what I don't know dwarfs what I do.... :)
     
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  11. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    I reckon for an erstwhile Windows guy your knowledge is pretty damn hot 8)
     
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  12. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Sorry, Bluerinse, but you guys and your statements about my Linux knowledge just crack me up. All I have to do to feel pretty dang ignorant about Debian and/or Linux is go read in the debianhelp.org forum, the debian-user@lists.debian.org mailing list, or any one of about a dozen other Linux forums. Or, start in on a new Debian project. I find out immediately just how little I really know yet.

    Using Debian for a year to year and a half still qualifies me as a beginner. It takes a good four or five years to really start getting competent at Linux, no matter how smart anyone is, and I'm no genius. There's just too much to learn.... My knowledge so far is about a mile wide and an inch deep. I'm still just really scratching the surface....
     
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  13. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    I realise that Freddy and I appreciate what you are saying and how you are trying to put it into perspective. But given the fact that you, like me are never going to know everything about whatever subject in IT grabs our attention, you shouldn't really dismiss what you have learnt already so easily.

    The more I learn, the more I realise how much there is still to learn. It is a never ending journey, a total labyrinth of information is out there.

    So, given the fact that you will never know it all, what counts in my book is how well you understand what you do know and you can help out others with less knowledge to try and grasp it, and follow in your footsteps too. It is in this capacity that you are the man!
     
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