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I need a new system, please help

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Juelz, Jun 14, 2015.

  1. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

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    Right Im so sick of my cheap laptop that just cant handle running multiple applications at once. I need a system that can handle running VMS as well as being able to flick back to the host OS and other programs with no delay. I'm think of upgrading my RAM but in a laptop that might prove difficult. I need a budget system that can cater for my needs but dont really know what I'm looking for.. the following link is a system I'm thinking of getting:

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Desktop-PC-...=1434308326&sr=8-16&keywords=8gb+ram+computer

    even though this is advertised as a gaming PC, I think the specs are good but would like opinions or possible alternatives.. the cheaper the better! I will probs just install linux on this system.. and just run things through VMs.
     
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  2. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

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    Also considering this

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/VIBOX-Visio...sbs_147_3?ie=UTF8&refRID=0TEK5G2H7DJPVAPK6A7B
     
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  3. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    Personally speaking I would be looking at a quad core for more multi-threaded throughput.

    One thing about virtualisation, you need a powerful CPU and lots of ram to ensure that you're boxes don't run like slugs, so skimping out doesn't pay in the situation.
     
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  4. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

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    True but wouldnt these systems do the job? I'm not going to be running multiple VMs at once.
     
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  5. Pseudonym

    Pseudonym Byte Poster

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    Yeah, I'd definitely be looking at a quad-core, and an SSD. Plus 8GB isn't really loads nowadays
     
  6. Pseudonym

    Pseudonym Byte Poster

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    Also, upgrading memory in a laptop is easier than desktop, if anything. You can get a huge boost if you've got an upgradeable CPU socket, and SSDs really do breathe life into old machines. What laptop do you have if you don't mind me asking?
     
  7. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    Then what's the reason for running VM's in the first place?
     
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  8. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    Now I disagree with this comment, upgrading the RAM in a desktop is as easy as 1,2,3.

    You're more likely to find soldered in CPU's in a laptop compared to a desktop and the upgradability of a desktop is greater then that of a laptop. Just my experience of course but having been playing with computers for over 30 years now it's a somewhat large experience.
     
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    WIP: VCP6-CMA, VCAP-DCD and Linux + (and possibly VCIX-NV).
  9. Pseudonym

    Pseudonym Byte Poster

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    Yeah, I mean, I'm just speaking generally. Obviously laptops can have cases that don't come apart easily or have onboard RAM, but most of the time it's just one screw and you're in.
     
  10. zxspectrum

    zxspectrum Gigabyte Poster Premium Member

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    Without jumping on the bandwagon, i dare say you would get 4 slots in the desktop as opposed to the laptop because of the size etc, meaning depending on what your budget was you could add more in than the laptop. I cant remember what a 64 bit system could have. At first it was unlimited then it was 192GB so not so sure now.

    Ed
     
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  11. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    As Juelz was talking Linux he's pretty much unlimited, with Windows 8 you're looking at either 128GB or 512GB depending on versions.
     
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  12. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

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    My use of running VMs is to follow along with the books I read and put things into practice. My current system struggles to run a single VM when I flick from host OS to guest OS the system just delays or doesnt respond. Its a 4GB DDR3, 500GB Intel Celeron 2.16 GHz.
     
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  13. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    Just spend a little more money and buy something with a quad core CPU and more than 8GB of ram, if you can't afford to do that now, wait and save up and do it, don't rush out and buy something now that you will regret in 3 months time, heck at this rate I would see what I had laying around here and sell something to you cheap that would meet your requirements.
     
    Certifications: CNA | CNE | CCNA | MCP | MCP+I | MCSE NT4 | MCSA 2003 | Security+ | MCSA:S 2003 | MCSE:S 2003 | MCTS:SCCM 2007 | MCTS:Win 7 | MCITP:EDA7 | MCITP:SA | MCITP:EA | MCTS:Hyper-V | VCP 4 | ITIL v3 Foundation | VCP 5 DCV | VCP 5 Cloud | VCP6 NV | VCP6 DCV | VCAP 5.5 DCA
    WIP: VCP6-CMA, VCAP-DCD and Linux + (and possibly VCIX-NV).
  14. Pseudonym

    Pseudonym Byte Poster

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    I know what you're both saying, and I agree. I was saying sheerly in terms of accessibility I reckon 9/10 times a laptop's marginally easier to swap out memory.
     
  15. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Quad core, preferably intel if laptop, 16 GB RAM, and get a 256 GB SSD.

    Generally desktops are cheaper and easier to upgrade than laptops, but they aren't so portable.

    So it depends if you want the portability really, and generally you are paying for the portability.

    Desktops are always faster, because they dont have mobile CPU variants and can consume more power and dissipate more heat.

    CPU upgrades in laptops are rare, only a handful of gaming laptops support it. I certainly wouldn't spend anything on your current laptop, its beyond redemption.

    Non ultra book laptops can normally have memory, keyboard, and HDD upgraded without issue. So you could always buy a laptop without an SSD and replace it if it made sense.

    Integrated graphics are fine if you are just doing sys admin type stuff and VM's. So you can save here. Same goes for sound.

    Never buy anything with a Celeron in it.

    If you buy higher density ram on fewer sticks, you can save some slots and have some upgadeability later.

    Worth paying for a bronze or above 600W+ power supply.

    I buy my stuff from overclockers, novatech, scan, ebuyer.

    You should be able to get a decent system for ~£450

    If using a system configurator you can drop out the HDD and OS, DVD to save money.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2015
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  16. Pseudonym

    Pseudonym Byte Poster

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    I've upgraded CPUs on several ordinary consumer laptops. I wouldn't personally say it's that much of a rarity.
     
  17. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    Yet I have seen a multitude of soldiered in CPU's, it's swings and roundabouts. A desktop PC will always be easier to upgrade and have a greater upgrade route than a laptop.
     
    Certifications: CNA | CNE | CCNA | MCP | MCP+I | MCSE NT4 | MCSA 2003 | Security+ | MCSA:S 2003 | MCSE:S 2003 | MCTS:SCCM 2007 | MCTS:Win 7 | MCITP:EDA7 | MCITP:SA | MCITP:EA | MCTS:Hyper-V | VCP 4 | ITIL v3 Foundation | VCP 5 DCV | VCP 5 Cloud | VCP6 NV | VCP6 DCV | VCAP 5.5 DCA
    WIP: VCP6-CMA, VCAP-DCD and Linux + (and possibly VCIX-NV).
  18. Pseudonym

    Pseudonym Byte Poster

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    I am in agreeance with your assertion, Simon.
     

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