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hub vs switches

Discussion in 'Networks' started by Mr.Cheeks, Apr 16, 2007.

  1. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    whats what? am i correct?

    a-hub = allows varies ethernet devices to "talk" to each, one at a time, send or recieve .

    b-switch similar as a hub, however, can communicate both ways, send and recieve packets at simulanesly.
    also dedicated bandwdith. its split wit ports being used, rather than all the ports.

    c.managed vs un-managed switch? i read up on this and sooo confused... can anyone explain in simpull terms?

    cheers
     
  2. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

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    Cheeks

    A hub allows devices to communicate with each other, but all devices connected to the hub are in the same 'broadcast domain'. This means that, in effect, all traffic sent to and from devices on that hub is broadcast to all other dev ices connected to it.

    A switch, on the other hand, maintains a separate broadcast domain for each port - meaning that traffic is only received by the appropriate device on the switch, making it much more efficient. This is achieved by the switch maintaining an ARP table of the MAC address of each device connected to it.

    Hubs traditionally operate at layer 1 of the OSI model, switches at layer 2.

    A managed switch is simply a switch with management features (SNMP, port mirroring, trunking, VLANs etc) whereas an unmanaged switch is a 'dumb' switch that has nothing other than a number of ports - think of it as 'plug & play'. Typically, an unamanaged switch will not have an IP address, whereas a managed switch will.

    HTH
     
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  3. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    still confused on the managed switch part :oops:
     
  4. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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    Think of it like a small computer intergrated into the switch that allows you to perform more complex tasks and setup the switch in a more advanced configuration.

    Typically you would manage the switch using a web browser (the switch itself would have a simple web server built into it) or in some cases an application provided by the manufacturer would be used to control the management functions of the switch.
     
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  5. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    oh... i thought it would be something exciting.... cheers
     
  6. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    well a large part of the cisco certification track revolves around managed switch configurations, thats pretty exciting

    a fully loaded 6513-E can run over £100'000, and take a week to properly configure and setup if you want absolutely everything on it, it can do in line firewalling, content switching, advanced routing, supply power to over 300 voice over ip phones, control wireless networks across the country, and pretty much anything else you want it to do
    oh and it takes two 8000 watt power supplies!

    now thats a managed switch ;)
     
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  7. onoski

    onoski Terabyte Poster

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    Now that's what I'd call fully loaded:biggrin
     
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  8. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Are you pulling my plonker :blink :eek:

    16 kilo Watts?

    Hmm at roughly 4 amps per kW that makes 64 amps - wtf where do you plug this switch in, directly to the national grid? :biggrin
     
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  9. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

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  10. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

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    I saw one of these in a data centre a while back (Globix I think it was, on Oxford St).

    Yeeesh - the noise was unreal - Like sticking your head in an aircraft hangar when a Boeing is warming up!

    Although, for sheer noise you'd have to go a long way to beat one of HP's fully loaded C-class blade enclosures. I was demoed one just before they had been RTMd last year and they have this cool power consumption util on them that cuts down on the power dynamically according to current usage. With the doobery switched on it was no louder than your average DL580 but turned off, the noise it put out was absolutely unbearable - I stood next to the demonstrator, who was shouting at the top of his voice and you could barely hear him!
     
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  11. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    yeah I just deployed a couple of C-Class vmware farms, man those things are noisey
    the power supplies are pretty clever too
    they have this adaptable system so that rather than use all 6 at say, 20% utilization which is crap efficiecy it will use like 3 at 70% efficiency, works pretty nicely, I do like the C-Class, just waiting for more people to deploy infiniband out the back of it now :D
     
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