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How many PCs should I get ?

Discussion in 'A+' started by Timewyrm, Aug 30, 2007.

  1. Timewyrm

    Timewyrm Bit Poster

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    Ok, got the books, got the training cds, and just got 1 pc from ebay, to tinker around with (Amd XP 1500Mhz (guessing it's an 1800+)). Question is, do I need to get another pc to tinker around with as well ?

    Keep in mind that I want to do Network+, MCDST and maybe Security+, by the end of next year, too. (And that I may upgrade the system(s) and sell them on ebay !)

    Regards,

    TimeWyrm
    :)
     
    Certifications: A+
    WIP: Network+
  2. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    ummm. short answer? no. Why spend money on an extra PC to tinker about with now if you dont need it (and you wont really, not for the A+). If and when you get to the stage where you need to be looking at networks, you can figure out exactly what else you need, and get more then.

    At the end of the day though, its entirely up to you.
     
    Certifications: ITIL Foundation; MCTS: Visual Studio Team Foundation Server 2010, Administration
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  3. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    I agree with Fergal, for the A+ you dont really need to pc's one is just fine. When you start studying for more advanced stuff like networking then you'll probably benefit more with multiple pc's.
     
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  4. Timewyrm

    Timewyrm Bit Poster

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    Thanks guys !
     
    Certifications: A+
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  5. C4sper

    C4sper Byte Poster

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    let's set one thing straight: there is no such thing as to many PC's !!!!!!!!!!!!!

    but i recon for A+ and MCDST one main (to do tests) and one 'scrap' one should be enough
     
    Certifications: ECDL, A+, MCP, MCDST
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  6. MacAllan

    MacAllan Byte Poster

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    It depends how much experience you already have. There is no absolute answer.

    My 2c. worth is that one isn't enough - unless you want to grab some old mobo's as well, so that you have the opportunity to look at different RAM types, chipsets etc. Different hard drives, cd/dvd drives, SCSI card etc might help as well. It's not so much the 'is one PC enough' question, as 'what do I do to mess around with this PC' that might be a more useful question once you get started.

    Everyone's way of doing things is different: I must have gone through 20 PCs, buying them off e-bay then selling them on after I'd played for a while (made a nice little profit too). My work experience had been with a very narrow cross-section of stuff and I figured I needed more.
     
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  7. Paul_o

    Paul_o Nibble Poster

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    i have about 5 in my pc room, i have vmware on my laptop which is fine but sometimes its better to get hands on experience with cables and such. one example is when i connected two pc's together via a lan cable but they would not talk, it was because i was not using a cross over cable, vmware does not teach you that.
     
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  8. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    One main pc and an old one from a junk shop for the A+ atleast.

    I dont think you'll ever need any more for anything other certs
     
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  9. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Personally, i'd go for a *main* PC and a PC to break for the A+.

    Not including laptops, PDA's etc. :)

    Boyce
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  10. cellardoor

    cellardoor Nibble Poster

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  11. dominoe

    dominoe Nibble Poster

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    you can always get some old bits off ebay or failing that.. have a look around the various computer fairs or car boot fairs
     
    Certifications: A+
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  12. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Virtualization programs such as Virtual PC or VMWare are great for playing around with different operating systems but won't teach you a thing about hardware. I'd agree with a minimum of 2 PCs...your "production" PC and one to break if it comes to that (and hopefully fix). Also get a small 4-port switch so you can network them. There are networking components to the A+ exams that you'll want to work on.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  13. Timewyrm

    Timewyrm Bit Poster

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    So it would be better to get the 4-port switch rather than 4 seperate (cheap) wireless cards ?

    By the way, thanks everyone for your replies
     
    Certifications: A+
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  14. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Yup, a switch is a much better option. 8)
     
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  15. Timewyrm

    Timewyrm Bit Poster

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    Can I ask what the difference is between the switch and between hardwiring the pcs into a router ?
     
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  16. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    A switch will allow you to connect multiple PCs together on one subnet and they can all talk to each other.

    A router will allow you to route traffic between subnets and also to other remote locations, it is a far more complex device than a switch. 8)
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
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  17. Timewyrm

    Timewyrm Bit Poster

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    So you means it's better to get a switch in order to learn about networking ?

    The only reason I ask is because, I'm getting a router for free from Sky
     
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  18. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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  19. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    I've got a copy of Guide to TCP/IP and it's great.

    I'm attaching a basic network diagram that shows how several PCs are connected to a switch using Ethernet patch cables. The switch is then connected to the router using another patch cable and the router is connected to whatever you've got that hits the Internet.

    You could connect a Wireless Access Point to the switch and add wireless computers to the mix, too.
     

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  20. Timewyrm

    Timewyrm Bit Poster

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    Thanks for the picture. Ok, I'm still confused. Routers, like the netgear dg834gt, have a few ethernet ports at the back. can't you just hardwire the pcs there ?

    Or is there a specific reason you need a switch.
    By the way, I saw something in Maplins the other day, called a kvm (?) switch, is that what you guys are talking about ?
     
    Certifications: A+
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