1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

How long should u stay in an entry level i.t job before moving on?...

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by fatp, Mar 10, 2008.

  1. fatp

    fatp Byte Poster

    196
    7
    44
    to the next step from it technician or first line support.


    6 months ... a year ?????


    I know this is a heavily 'opinionated' arguement and so please back up your case/ reasoning?


    fatp.
     
    Certifications: Comp Sci BSc, NVQ 2 & 3 IT Professional
    WIP: Comptia A+, Network+
  2. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

    5,726
    175
    221
    Until you can do the job above, or atleast do it well enough to get by
    Most folks get the oppertunity to get involved with more responsible tasks over time, if your in a place where that doesnt happen, after a year start looking, dont leave till you find something though, you may end up where you started


    It may seem on the outside I have it pretty easy these days, but I went through the same stuff, with a peak unemployment of 18 months!
    Over qualified, Under Qualified, out of work for two long, not enough 'recent' commercial experiance etc, it all gets in the way until you having something special and unique to offer
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, VCP
    WIP: > 0
  3. MrNerdy

    MrNerdy Megabyte Poster

    544
    4
    0
    I did 2 years in an entry level IT job.
    The experience i gained was helpful in not just doing the job, but doing it well.
    The next 1 year with the same NHS Trust enabled me to build on what i had learnt.
    By gaining 'On the job' expereince it enabled me to offer a better service to the users i helped.

    6-18 months would give you plenty of experience to then climb the IT ladder.
     
    Certifications: ECDL, CiscoIT1 & A+
    WIP: Girlfriend & Network+
  4. UCHEEKYMONKEY
    Honorary Member

    UCHEEKYMONKEY R.I.P - gone but never forgotten. Gold Member

    4,140
    58
    214
    I concur with Mr Nerdy. Although one IT recuitment agency stated you must have at least 2 years work experience.

    I guess it depends on the employer and the job. I think you got to put yourself in the employer's shoes and think if you were employing someone who keeps changing their job every 6 months. Would you bother to train them knowing they may leave in 6 months time and you would have to re-advertise the job again?

    Howver, if your bored or can't move up the field where you are then maybe you should try temping or stick it out and get 1 year's worth of work experience under your belt?8)

    But don't leave until you know you have got another job to go to!:blink8)
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+
    WIP: Comptia N+
  5. UCHEEKYMONKEY
    Honorary Member

    UCHEEKYMONKEY R.I.P - gone but never forgotten. Gold Member

    4,140
    58
    214
    Removed post.

    I don't know what's happening today with my PC, but it seems to be hanging, like a big hanging thing...:p:biggrin
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+
    WIP: Comptia N+
  6. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

    4,570
    68
    196
    I've been doing desktop support for a year and half now and I am very happy with the job because the place that I am at I can progress and over the years become a network administrator. I didn't start at help desk, I started as desktop support and continually growing to do more complicated server tasks. It's important to consider the fact of future promotion. That is if in time you will be given more tasks and projects and with that grow. If not then after you get a good 1 year of experience try to look for something else. I don't know maybe it's just me but 1 year of experience seems like a big difference when compared to 6 months.

    Good luck.
     
    Certifications: A+ | CCA | CCAA | Network+ | MCDST | MCSA | MCP (270, 271, 272, 290, 291) | MCTS (70-662, 70-663) | MCITP:EMA | VCA-DCV/Cloud/WM | VTSP | VCP5-DT | VCP5-DCV
    WIP: VCAP5-DCA/DCD | EMCCA
  7. Rob1234

    Rob1234 Megabyte Poster

    782
    24
    69
    If you enjoy doing the job stay as long as you can, it's not always about the money :D
     
    Certifications: A few.
  8. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

    19,136
    462
    374
    I was going to say the same thing. Repped!
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  9. harpistic

    harpistic Byte Poster

    242
    4
    29
    Hmm, I was about to say 'until you're no longer learning, and no longer being challenged' - though as Phoenix said, as time goes by you'd probably be assigned more complex stuff...
     
    Certifications: Pet Geekery
    WIP: cure for insomnia
  10. sunn

    sunn Gigabyte Poster

    1,562
    24
    79
    I think the default answer is 2-years. However, one can get a lot of experience in less time, while others can get stuck in a specific role and not get to open their wings to experience more.

    The ‘correct’ answer is probably when you’ve done / absorbed all you can in a role it's time to decide to move on, or be content. In addition to the techie side, understand the processes and practices of how a task is performed / implemented in a corporate environment.
     
  11. fortch

    fortch Kilobyte Poster

    408
    21
    35
    Also depends on your immediate supervisor -- some people are so good that their boss doesn't want them to leave, and actually prevents advancement. I've been in this position more than once (not just IT), and had to *hint* at moving elsewhere before advancement was possible. Note that it wasn't my outstanding abilities that created this problem, just poor management.

    Rule of thumb on any IT progression, and not just entry-level, is what Ryan said. Plus, you have to show aptitude and/or skill for the position you move into.
     
    Certifications: A+,Net+,Sec+,MCSA:Sec,MCSE:Sec,mASE
  12. Neil

    Neil Byte Poster

    214
    10
    35
    I think that it has alot to do with your current duties as well. If you're not doing nothing much, then you won't be equipped, experienced or knowledgable enough to handle the job at the next level.

    When I became an IT Support tech, I used to hang around some of the older and experienced techs and eventually I learnt some useful stuff on Active Directory, Remote Desktop linking to the server, and how to fix Outlook mail problems resulting from users and changes made on the server. I was not "paid" to do stuff outside my regular duties, but I didn't look at money or respective duties there. I looked at an opportunity to learn and develop my skills. And whenever any of these guys took their day-off, I was called in to assist in their place (only on busy days ofcourse). Pretty soon, 2 of them resigned and I was moved up!

    So moving up in IT in my opinion, isn't measured in months or years, but rather in the amount of knowledge and experience you have in the position you currently have, as well as the position you want to move up to. Example: A tech who only knows to build and assemble computers and who has 5 years of experience shouldn't jump right away to become a network tech/admin -- just because he has 5 years exp behind him! He would definitely need knowledge and experience in networking (or probably do Network+ ;) ) before delving in for such a position.
     
    Certifications: CompTIA A+ & Network+
    WIP: MCSA: 70-270
  13. The_Geek

    The_Geek Megabyte Poster

    772
    13
    64
    I agree. I've had the chance to go to work for other companies making 3 times what I'm making now. But where I am now I have a company car and gas card and I'm outside a lot, not stuck in an office all day. :D
     
    Certifications: CompTIA and Micro$oft
    WIP: PDI+
  14. csx

    csx Megabyte Poster

    511
    6
    81
    Depends on how quickly you can learn the stuff. :)

    I was in 1st line support for a year and a bit... now I've moved on and doing Migration work for the NHS - which is different every day!

    But i cannot see my self staying in the same job without learning anything new for 12-18 months. Personal preference, but i want to keep learning and keep pushing for that well paid job and actually feel i have achieved something then sitting on my backside. :)
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, 70-271 & 70-272, CCENT, VCP5-DCV and CCNA
    WIP: Citrix
  15. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

    19,136
    462
    374
    And that's one of the best ways to move up... it absolutely works.

    Great advice... rep given!
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!

Share This Page

Loading...