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How do you think?

Discussion in 'The Lounge - Off Topic' started by Leehaa, Dec 15, 2008.

  1. Leehaa

    Leehaa Gigabyte Poster

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    How do you think / what type of revision helps you remember things best?

    I find that anything with a kind of 'rhythm' or 'eccentricity' seems to sink in...songs - sometimes I DETEST this as with so many songs, If i've listened to them for more than 3 times, the words seem to sink into my head forever. New ones definitely go round my head when I'm sleeping - like they are being embedded or something - sometimes wake up aware that I'm processing a song / in the middle of replaying it and mid-verse (which is annoying if it's something I don't like much). I can even remember songs and poems that we sang in Brownies and Girl Guides years back...and word for word.

    Also, numbers...I find it easy to remember registration plates, birth dates and house numbers / post codes as they all seem to have a pattern to them.

    Do you process things via rhythm or more factually?

    What process do you use to get information - such as for your exams etc into your head?
     
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    WIP: BSc IT & Computing, RHCE
  2. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

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    Repetition, and more repetition.
     
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  3. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    I just plug into the Matrix and get the info download :biggrin

    It depends on what exam, but for the most part (like kevicho) repetition, practice, repetition, practice. By using a combination of books, CBT's, practice exams and hands on experience. Sometimes with rhythmic (with the radio/music or the tv in the background), but it does depend on my frame of mind at the moment in time.

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
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  4. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    By repetition for learning stuff. As for remembering numbers like bank numbers I am like you there's a pattern to them
     
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  5. Cockles

    Cockles Megabyte Poster

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    Numbers are made more easier to remember by chunking. Phone numbers, for example, tend to appear in 3 blocks of 4-3-4 numbers to help you remember. Also, what works for me, rather than physically remembering numbers, I remember the sequence I type them into a keypad. Example, if I do any telephone banking and need to type in my account number, it's the finger pattern on the phone keypad I remember. If I need to recall the number, just need to visualise the keypad and what gets pressed in what order. Sounds weird but it really works!

    Repetition and association is the easiest way for the long term memory to retain information. Information goes into the short term memory and needs to be in there long enough to be committed to the long term memory, but associating it witgh something speeds that up. So let say you read a fact, you can then associate that fact with something already retained, makes it a lot easier for recall later on
     
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  6. twizzle

    twizzle Gigabyte Poster

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    I think chaotically with no order. This does make it hard to revise for exams, so i never bother. Repetition only works so far, yet i still forget some of it as i just cant concentrate long enough to repeat things enough times.
    I'm of the great homers school of thought

    "Everytime I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my head!"

    I've forgotten more than i can remeber and will never learn as much as i forget!
     
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  7. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    We are borg. :borgsmile

    Just kidding. Actually, what works for me has already been mentioned a number of times here and, in my research, seems to be the top method of reducing "bad habits" and cultivating good habits": repetition. Human brain structures actually change over time, depending on what you do habitually. If you spend most of your time on the couch, eating cheetos and watching soap operas, you are training your brain to be a better couch laying, cheeto eating, soap opera watcher. You aren't just what you eat but you are what you do.
     
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  8. Leehaa

    Leehaa Gigabyte Poster

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    Oh totally agreed - I am so fluent with that, that I fully cover my hand up when keying in a pin - it's a great thing tho can still remember the numbers for back-up 8)...
     
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  9. Leehaa

    Leehaa Gigabyte Poster

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    Cheers for that :thumbleft
     
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    WIP: BSc IT & Computing, RHCE
  10. Leehaa

    Leehaa Gigabyte Poster

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    Lol :biggrin
     
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  11. Leehaa

    Leehaa Gigabyte Poster

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    Very true!
     
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  12. Cockles

    Cockles Megabyte Poster

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    Pleasure. That's an incredibly short overview but that's the general principle:

    Information goes in via senses
    Information goes to short term memory
    Depending on factors (e.g. amount of information taken in, frequency of new information, time spent on any singular piece of information etc) information does/does not get committed to long term memory. Everyone is different so different factors affect retention, just a case of finding out what works best
     
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  13. grim

    grim Gigabyte Poster

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    i find if i'm interested in what i'm reading it sticks better than if i reading it coz i have to. I tend to find once i'm in the right mood and focused on what i'm doing i kinda have to ride it out and make the most of it. i tend to briefly read over what i covered the last time i studyed as a recap. Coffee also works wonders for me, it helps my concerntration no end :)

    GRim
     
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  14. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    I've always had a good memory (well - at least, I have a good memory for facts, but not remembering things that have to be done around the house! :oops: ). But what works best for me is putting my hands on something. That way, when I read about something, I have something concrete to wrap my brain around, which helps me understand the concepts so that it's more than just words, words, words.
     
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