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how can a sending host make a local request if there is a router between..

Discussion in 'Routing & Switching' started by kobem, Aug 18, 2009.

  1. kobem

    kobem Megabyte Poster

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    Please think of the example below.

    host-a <(x)----- (y)>*****<(z)------(t) >host-b

    x --> host_a ethernet int IP = 172.16.10.2
    y --> router a ethernet int IP = 172.16.10.1
    z --> router_a ethernet int. IP = 172.16.20.1
    t --> host_b ethernet int. IP = 172.16.20.2

    According to the diagram:biggrin there are different subnets also different networks of a one major
    network. And it has to be like this if a router is used between hosts as above. But, in this
    occasion, you know if each interface of router consists of different networks , how can a
    sending host(host_a) make a local request? (for ARP)

    2- Secondly another example. You know that we make use of DSL router(s) to share Internet
    Connection for hosts. Consider five hosts using private addresses like 172.16.10.3 , 172.16.10.4 ,172.16.10.5 ,
    172.16.10.6 and 172.16.10.7. As you can see these are from one network. On the other hand ,
    we know router must have seperate network interfaces. So how can we share Internet?
     
    Certifications: CCNA
  2. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

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    [​IMG]
     
    Certifications: A few
    WIP: None - f*** 'em
  3. ThomasMc

    ThomasMc Gigabyte Poster

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    Not sure why he keeps posting the same message these days ;)
     
    Certifications: MCDST|FtOCC
    WIP: MCSA(70-270|70-290|70-291)
  4. VantageIsle

    VantageIsle Kilobyte Poster

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    Ever thought about becoming a driving instructor..........

    :blink
     
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  5. dazza786

    dazza786 Megabyte Poster

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    earning upto 31k a year? :ohmy
     
    Certifications: MCP (271, 272, 270, 290, 291, 621, 681, 685), MCDST, MCTS, MCITP, MCSA, Security+, CCA(XA6.5)
  6. VantageIsle

    VantageIsle Kilobyte Poster

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    Yes, and you can choose the hours that suit you....

    :biggrin
     
    Certifications: A+, ITIL V3, MCSA, MCITP:EST, CCENT, 70-432-SQL, 70-401 SCCM
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  7. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Kobem you ask the same question in different ways all the time, I think your brain has become so muddled with stuff that you have become so confused you don't know what you are doing anymore.

    Please take a step back learn some basics then go onto things that are a bit more advanced for you and please get a book on networking I am sure they sell them in Turkey and don't make up some excuse like some mad crazy dictator has taken over your city and that you need to join the army to over throw him or something :)
     
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  8. JonnyMX

    JonnyMX Petabyte Poster

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    He's already done that.

    Keep up!

    :biggrin
     
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  9. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    I know but there could be a sequel...Kobem 2 with the tag line you can't destroy him, you cant beat him but he can screw with your head by asking you same networking questions in different ways :D
     
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  10. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    I thought you were studying for the CCNA, anyway... Here's a basicc tutorial on "How LAN switches work", it also covers routers.

    For example, take a look at the following home router:

    [​IMG]

    The blue cable connects to the modem, internet, another network (whatever)... The socket with the grey cable (and the other 3 sockets next to it) is what the nodes (eg pc's, network printers, etc) are plug into. Then the router/switch performs magic (in other words NAT) and lets all those clients out into the internet. Routers have 2 or more network cards in order so that they can route traffic.

    I do not know if I can get it any more simpler.

    -ken
     
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  11. JonnyMX

    JonnyMX Petabyte Poster

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  12. VantageIsle

    VantageIsle Kilobyte Poster

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    ^ ahhhh, so thats a router...

    A router is a very useful tool — and potentially quite dangerous. A little knowledge goes a long way toward using a router safely. If you're not very handy you might want to reconsider using a router or at least be extra careful.
     
    Certifications: A+, ITIL V3, MCSA, MCITP:EST, CCENT, 70-432-SQL, 70-401 SCCM
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