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Homemaker to Study/Job

Discussion in 'New Members Introduction' started by confusedme, Aug 10, 2008.

  1. confusedme

    confusedme New Member

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    Hello & Wishes to everyone,

    I did my Bachelors in Computer Science 2 years back. Now I am a homemaker and a mother of a 1 year old. I wish to continue my studies in MSc, but circumstances does not allow to pursue it now. Consulted number of microsoft training institutes. I got different opinions . One said to start comptia a+, the other suggested MCP. I dont have any work experience, although my primary interest is in programming( C, C++, VF).

    Would be great to share your advices & suggestions in this regard.
     
    WIP: Computia A+
  2. SuPaStA

    SuPaStA Nibble Poster

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    I wouldnt bother with a A+, rather start with a mcp and work your way towards a Mcse.
     
    Certifications: CCNA,MCSE,ITIL,Server+,Security+,N+...
    WIP: CCNP
  3. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Well it really depends what your goal is, as to what you should do.

    If you just want to study, just buy books and study whatever interests you.

    There are no certs relevant to C/C++ as far as I am aware, coding ability is all that matters.

    VF ? Do you mean Visual Fortran ? :blink

    The A+ and MCSE certifications are primarily for IT support or administrator positions, it never hurts to be aware of how your programs will be deployed and supported, but in general these certs are not directly relevant to programmers.

    You can still do an MSc with a university part time or with the OU, they tend to be a little pricey however compared to BSc's.
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  4. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

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    Hi there and welcome 8)
     
    Certifications: SIA DS Licence
    WIP: A+ 2009
  5. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Hi & welcome to CF :)

    I would not do the support/adminstration certs if you want to go down the programming/software engineering route, in my opinion. Concentrate on the field/area you want to get into, then once you're in then maybe start branching out :)

    While I do not know of any specific IT professional certification aimed directly at C++, there are always languages closely related like Java, MS C++ & MS C# with certifications to go with them. You can even download express versions of the programming languages here (for MS) and here (for Java). However please be aware that professional certifications aren't like academic quals. Professional certifications should reflect your job role and responsibilities, so make sure that you pick the relevant certifications (eg entry level professional certs).

    Like dmarsh26 already said, you can study for your MSc either via distance learning (eg OU) or at your local Uni in the evenings (2 evenings a week for 2 years) at the cost of about £2k per year.

    Other than that good luck with your career change :)

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  6. Notes_Bloke

    Notes_Bloke Terabyte Poster

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    Hi & welcome to CF:D

    NB
     
    Certifications: 70-210, 70-215, A+,N+, Security+
    WIP: MCSA
  7. confusedme

    confusedme New Member

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    Hi All,

    Thanks for all the valued suggestions & welcome.

    I had my own inhibitions for an MSc due to the time restrictions with baby. At the housechores, it was a moment of spurt of questions on C/C++ by my friend which triggered me to study..But my main intention to study is to get a job..So, I had second thoughts that if the job was the objective, then one should do a CompTia+/MCP, then get onto a job, and then work progressively towards another certification.

    I have one doubt although. Does these certifications hold equal respect/reputation as compared to a MSc? The viable option for me to do an MSc would be by either doing part time/OU..Is the MSc done by OU reputable? (Would that help me in the job market?)..Could someone suggest some good OU/part time MSc in UK?

    On Plan B, I wish to do a job right now (for which some certifications might be needed coz' of my expat BSc), earn some, do an MSc after two years (coz' an MSc for an expat may be around £10-15K).

    Thanks for the patience.

    P.S: Sorry for the VF - VisualFoxPro
     
    WIP: Computia A+
  8. SuPaStA

    SuPaStA Nibble Poster

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    Comptia qualifications are not as respected as M$ ones.Go look at the job market and you will see they never ask for a network+,a+...they ask for a MCP as min.

    For a quick job in the IT sector a mcp is your first port of call I think.

    Where u from originaly by the way?
     
    Certifications: CCNA,MCSE,ITIL,Server+,Security+,N+...
    WIP: CCNP
  9. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    I've never seen a requirement or FoxPro these days so I'd steer clear of that.

    An MSc is indeed a very expensive proposition for an expat and may not pay off in the job market.

    Programming ability is the number one requirement for a programming job, if you can program well from your BSc then you should just start applying now.

    C# .Net seems to be the current in vouge language and MS offer the MCAD/MCSD/MCPD certs, however the the certs are are generally designed for someone with experience.

    You can take the certs on managed C++ but they really test on .Net framework knowledge and not standard C++.
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  10. Mathematix

    Mathematix Megabyte Poster

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    To be honest, an MSc is a different qualification to a specific cert (or set of certs) opening more doors for you career-wise.

    I have a comp sci degree and no certs, have considered a Masters in maths, but realised that that would be more of an interest thing rather than being directly relevant to my career choice, so have abandoned that idea at least for now. You need to address the same questions in where you want to go and where your chosen qualifications are likely to take you. I have noticed the magic 'C/C++' phrase waved around a lot by newcomers to the forum. I'd imagine that the reason why there are no certs for the language is that it is way too in-depth in terms of its applicable uses, and the structure of the language itself is so varied that skill cannot be reliably assessed by exam alone; experience makes the grade for C/C++ programming.

    Good luck with whatever you choose, but be careful not to make an expensive mistake in chosing the wrong quals to study. :)
     
    Certifications: BSc(Hons) Comp Sci, BCS Award of Merit
    WIP: Not doing certs. Computer geek.
  11. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    You can take a look at one of my old treads here which say where certain professional certifications sit on the NQF. From an educational point of view the highest level that a Professional certification sits at is level 4, a degree would sit at level 6 and a MSc (or any Masters) sits at level 7.

    From a real world point of view, I haven't seen any non-IT management jobs requiring a Masters degree. I have seen IT management posts that either require a Master's or list it as desirable, but at this stage the most important thing is to get your foot in the door. :)

    As for whether professional cert hold equal respect/reputation yes and no - it depends what level the position is. If you're going for an entry level IT position having the A+, Network+, MCDST would be benefical and having a MSc may put you in the category of over qualified. If you apply for a managers level position, you'll get turned down for not having the experience (the catch 22 scenario). However, if you get your MSc you may get on got to a graduate scheme, but then again there is no guarantees...

    -ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  12. confusedme

    confusedme New Member

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    Hai,
    Was a bit busy with family. I have been thinking about my education with the opinion i received here, I have decided to do comptia+, just to keep in track and so that i dont loose my knowledge in this field. I want to persue my MSc in a good university in full time basis, which is not possible now and that brought me to this decision. Can someone suggest me with a good material since Iam planning to do it by myself. How is it that we do this without any help from any institute. Do we register for the exam first and then prepare for it, or prepare first and apply for the exam. Once registered how long does it take to have the exam. How long does it take to complete a course.
     
    WIP: Computia A+
  13. confusedme

    confusedme New Member

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    I am from kerala, India. what is the actual big difference in comptia+ and mcp
     
    WIP: Computia A+
  14. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    CompTIA's A+ is an entry level, vendor neutral certification, that covers computer *hardware* and a little bit about recent operating systems. The cert does not expire and is globally recognised.

    MCP (Microsoft Certified Professional) is the designation that one receives after passing one of Microsoft's many exams on the Windows 2000 / XP Server 2003 track.. there are a few exceptions to this though, so you should research whatever exam you are considering to see if it leads to MCP status (if that is what you want). MCP therefore is not vendor neutral and the cert will naturally expire once the technology is no longer used. Of course Microsoft certs are globally recognised too. Microsoft certifications do not go into much detail about computer hardware, they cover *their products* and are harder to attain than the A+
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  15. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    As for which way to do it (book then study or study then book) it's up to you, as you can always reschedule if you're not ready. A good book is the the one from Mike Meyers and get yourself a practice exam set from a good vendor like Boson, Transcender or Preplogic.

    You can register for the A+ exams (you need two to get the cert) at any Prometric or PearsonVue testing centre.

    Hope this helps

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  16. confusedme

    confusedme New Member

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    Thankyou for the advice. After loads of surfing atlast confined to the Mike Meyer's comptia+ book. I have ordered one and waiting for it. Then lets see how it catches me.
    :)
     
    WIP: Computia A+
  17. slimshaney

    slimshaney Bit Poster

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    Hi & welcome to CF
     
    WIP: MCSE,MCDST

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