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Hey all

Discussion in 'New Members Introduction' started by cjhorn85, Oct 8, 2008.

  1. cjhorn85

    cjhorn85 New Member

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    Hey all, looking into going into a IT career, and hopefully will get some useful info from this site.

    Ive already made a posting, but to summarise, I was recommended a course by Advent training - Advanced Networking Specialist. However, the price has put me off, and I'm looking for cheaper and possibly just as efficient ways to gain this qualification, as £6000 is a lot of money!

    The modules they do as part of this course are
    * CompTIA A+
    * Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP)
    * Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician (MCDST)
    * Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA)
    * Microsoft Certified System Engineer (MCSE)
    * MCSE: Security on Windows Server 2003
    * MCSE: Messaging on Windows Server 2003
    * Cisco CCNA Network Associate (CCNA)

    If anyone can recommend a good way of gaining these qualifications, while taking on a full time job, that would be great!

    Cheers guys
    Chris
     
  2. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    First I reccomend just stopping, taking in a deep breath, looking around, becomming one with your environment....

    Seriously, you have never undertaken one certification yet, so how do you know you want/need to take £6000's worth of them ? Who has told you this ? Why did you believe them ?

    What is your background and experience, where are you now ? What job do you wish to get, where do you want to go ? How do you think you can there ?

    Its basic Gap analysis get it ?

    My advice would be to take the cert most appropriate to your current level, thats probably the A+.

    Personal development is a gradual process, its like a spiral staircase, you have to take it one step at a time, gradually you build up and make progress.

    Plan one cert at a time, Rome wasn't built in a day, you can't cram it all into your head Matrix style unfortunately...

    Best of luck :D
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  3. cjhorn85

    cjhorn85 New Member

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    Thanks,

    My other post didn't seem to go through for some reason.

    That was my other concern, I've been looking into an IT career for some time, and all Advent did was confirm my thoughts that I would like to go into a networking area of IT. So they did help me there.
    However, reading what you have said makes complete sense. I did a degree in Mathematical Physics, and I also have a strong interest in computers. I guess because I didn't like my degree I'm looking for a quick fix.

    So where now? It had occurred to me that the A+ course would be the best one to start with, and go from there. What are the job opportunities with this single qualification? You read around all the sites trying to sell this qualification, saying its "plenty of opportunities", but how realistic is this? I understand that nothing is guaranteed, but its nice to know what the chances are.

    Also, I read the sticky thread about self study, and its an idea that appeals quite a lot to me. However, I do have one question - how exactly do the exams work? Where do you get the information about this from?

    Thanks
    Chris

    PS. Is it worth moving this topic into another part of the forum?
     
  4. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    A degree in Mathematical Physics is an excellent start and should help you get a job in IT. It depends if you're set on Networking or not.

    What are your feelings on Software Development ?

    There are many jobs where your background could be useful

    Finance - Quantative Developer
    IT - Software Developer
    Engineering - Embedded Developer
    Space - Saterlite Development

    Many companies will recruit bright graduates from various backgrounds, IBM, CapGemini, Accenture, BT, GCHQ etc.

    A few certs wouldn't hurt but I'd concentrate on marketing yourself based on your degree to start with.
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  5. cjhorn85

    cjhorn85 New Member

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    Well, a lot of software development to my knowledge revolvs around programming, which is something I didn't particularly enjoy at University, so that is why I haven't really looked into the area much.

    Also, because I only achieved a BSc in Mathematical Physics, without the honors, it seems that employers dont even notice I have a degree.

    I'm not set on networking. Its just one of the areas that interests me most, and I am quite happy to put in the time in to gain a few certs if it helps me towards a better career.
     
  6. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    It sounds like a tough degree, don't beat yourself up about finishing without honors, its still probably worth more than many other degrees even without honors.

    I've just finished watching a BCS video where they are complaining on the lack of Computer Science graduates and how companies will consider business or other graduates to make up the short fall. I would expect people with Maths or Physics degrees to be first in line.

    Landing your first job even with a degree is tough, I sent well over 100 applications and I had an honours degree. Being flexible on compaines, pay and location can make a big difference. Once you get a few years experience you can be a bit more choosy.

    May I ask why you chose a degree in Mathematical Physics ?
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH

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