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Help with getting started in IT

Discussion in 'New Members Introduction' started by sonofleek, Jan 19, 2007.

  1. sonofleek

    sonofleek New Member

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    Hi everyone.
    Im really keen to satrt a career in IT. I had a guy from computeach to visit and he decided i would best suit programming. He wants me to do IC3, MCDST, MCAD and MCSD. The cost for all this is huge and to be honest im not sure what it all means, or if i need it.
    I've been doing some research and it seems i can buy all the textbooks and exam preperation for a fraction of the price.
    Could anybody help me please.
     
  2. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    First - welcome to CF!

    I must admit this sounds as if he was trying to sell you the most expensive course he could find!

    What evidence did he produce that said that you would "best suit progamming"? It isn't an easy thing, and requires a certain flair to be sucessful at it. I would only trust a properly administered test to determine this, rather than a home visit.

    Yes - you can get most certs by buying the books and doing home study - and at a fraction of the price.

    Perhaps if you gave us a bit more background to your situation and experience we could help more.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  3. zimbo
    Honorary Member

    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    Welcome to CF! 8)

    Im with harry on this one...that is a really expensive course.. and in some cases one course has nothing to do with the other. MCDST deals with the administration and troubleshooting of Windows while MCSD is a application develpment.

    Yes you can do all this by yourself using home study!

    The question i want to ask is; you say you want to get into IT - do YOU know which area of IT you want to get into? I suggest examine different roles out there before choosing what training you want to do.
     
    Certifications: B.Sc, MCDST & MCSA
    WIP: M.Sc - Computer Forensics
  4. sonofleek

    sonofleek New Member

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    i have done all sorts of various jobs in the past, none really IT based at all. I have always wanted to get into IT and ive got to that stage where im ready to make the change. I have a good educational background (a- levels, degree) and am motivated and keen to study. The MCSD did really apeel to me, but how to get there the correct way and cheapest is baffling me. I would have to work around my current job, so home learning seems the best way.
    Sorry im so vague, but want to get some unbaised advice.
     
  5. BobT

    BobT Nibble Poster

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    Hi sonofleek and welcome to CF - I suggest you browse this site before making any decisions, it's full of useful information about all aspects of IT and many training providers. Regards.
     
    Certifications: Bugger All
    WIP: A+ Network+ Server+ Security+MCDST
  6. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Well. Perhaps one way to see if programming is for you is to get a development set of tools, some books and see if they make any sense! :biggrin

    The Microsoft tools aren't cheap, but there is a free open source set here. Make sure you download the full package, including the compiler.

    For books I'm not sure what would be good for a total beginner - perhaps someone else could comment.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  7. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    I note that the salesman suggested you started out with basic certs. Probably no bad thing. However I would have thought that ECDL would be better than IC3 for a *total* computing beginner.

    If you are reasonably familiar with computers then you could skip that though.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  8. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    I replied to your post here. Please post in the most relevant forum once.

    Thanks.
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  9. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Er <cough> - this was his first post.

    I assumed he had revised his plan somewhat!

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  10. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Fair point - I just didn't want sonofleek missing any good advice by having two similar threads on the go.
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  11. zimbo
    Honorary Member

    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    hang on you said you want to go down the MCSE route

    yet you have some guy telling you the MCSD and some other certs is where you "suited".... First step i suggest is look at which area you want to get into.. IT can be anything - security, network admin, support, software developement and the list can go on and on... dont let some salesman say "oh i think you should do this" - all he cares is you buy some 5k course over 2 years and you end up either training to be something you have no idea what it entails or something because you were told there are jobs in the field... look at your options very carefully mate.
     
    Certifications: B.Sc, MCDST & MCSA
    WIP: M.Sc - Computer Forensics
  12. sonofleek

    sonofleek New Member

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    yeah i think your right. do you think its wise to do the A+ and then have a good look at where i want to go. I know i want to get into this and by doing the A+ and getting a feel and knowledge i will be able to choose better.
    Ive already decided to do self learning, and knock computeach on the head.
     
  13. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Good plan. If you are motivated and disciplined enough to study without someone kicking you in the rear all the time, you'll do quite well with self-study methods. I highly recommend it.

    I'd suggest the A+ All-in-One Exam Guide, Sixth Edition by Michael Meyers to study for the A+. For hands-on practice, I'd recommend PC Technician Street Smarts by our very own James Pyles (tripwire45).

    Best of luck! And welcome to the forum!
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  14. zimbo
    Honorary Member

    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    yeah go with the A+.. if you really want to get into software development you can look at learning a programming language after the A+ otherwise if you think hardware is the way to go then look at some higher certs...
     
    Certifications: B.Sc, MCDST & MCSA
    WIP: M.Sc - Computer Forensics
  15. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Flush this advice completely from your mind. It sounds like he was trying to fill seats on a pending courses rather than guiding you in the right career path.

    I could be wrong, you might turn out to be a brilliant programmer but developing code is not for the faint hearted and it takes a certain type of person to be able to cope and earn a living doing it. Much like database admin work, It would bore the pants off me.
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  16. Jakamoko
    Honorary Member

    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Hi and welcome to CF, sonofleek :D

    You will most certainly get that here - I can assure you. As the Guys have alluded to - ignore the pitch you've had and go with your instinct (and the advice here so far) - do A+. which will open your eyes, then work out what YOU want to be working towards, NOT what a sales person wants to sell you !!
     
    Certifications: MCP, A+, Network+
    WIP: Clarity
  17. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    I believe (job wise) that everyone should try and achieve what they want, not what someone has told them. Is this person in a position to advise on what you should do?

    Think of the analogy/contrast of a waiter and your GP.

    Your GP will advise you that your LDL level is high and not to eat eggs and red meat based on their professional opinion. A waiter, on the other hand will bring you whatever wine or meal you want - they are going to get a tip and wages regardless.

    I love the A+ ! A lot of people will say you don't need it, employers don't know what it is etc. Even if you don't want to become A+ Certified, grab a book from Amazon and learn the material - it will give you a *Ready Brek* start!
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  18. adamoliver

    adamoliver New Member

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    I have been doing some research on various sites after having a computeach salesman around to see me this Friday (09/03/07). In his mind I am best suited to database related courses, then after much spiel on this subject and the benefits etc I was told the cost, nice and cheap it was to not!!
    £5250 :eek:
    which would be for one years studying to get compTIA A+, MCP, MCDBA, MCSA and MCSE. I use computers alot and have even built two with my brother, however i have to say my knowledge on IT is not vast.
    I have read alot of commments on this forum related to similar situtaions as my own. Is there anyone who has studied with Computeach that can give me there opinion? Further anyone who has advice to give on how to proceed with this matter?

    My background is retail manager, no IT job experience

    Adam
     
    Certifications: none
    WIP: none
  19. Mathematix

    Mathematix Megabyte Poster

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    Sonofleek

    How did this guy from computeach know that you were best suited to programming if you've never had any IT experience? Do you have an IT related degree?
     
    Certifications: BSc(Hons) Comp Sci, BCS Award of Merit
    WIP: Not doing certs. Computer geek.
  20. Frontier

    Frontier Byte Poster

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    Hi, why has he suggested you do the MCDST?? From what I understand this is desktop support and IMHO this has naff all to do with programming?? What made him decide you would be suited to programming? did you sit a test? not everyone is suited to programming or has the apititude for it - I am not trying to put you off or insult your intellegence it just seems alot of these sales people suggest programming to people who have never even done it before. I have just started a programming course and even in the foundation stages there are elements where I scratch my head and find hard. It is proberbly the hardest area of IT to learn and get into. Before I started my course I had played around with vb and pascal already - I got myself a dummies guide to vb and a pascal book to see if I would enjoy it. If I had not have done this I would not have had any idea whether I would enjoy it or have any apititude for it at all. My advice would be to purchase a book that covers the basics of vb or another language that is easier to learn to make sure you will enjoy it.
     

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