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Help on a IT career?

Discussion in 'Training & Development' started by MASTER J, Mar 21, 2006.

  1. MASTER J

    MASTER J New Member

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    Hi,
    I'm new to the forum!
    Just want some advice for my future.

    I'm 19 nearly 20 living in Yorkshire, UK. I want a career in IT but don't really know what field to go into. I have looked at web designing and programming and the A+ Certification but again I’m not sure where I should go. Also I have looked at the course from Computeach and ICSLEARN.

    Can any body help me and give some advice thanks.
     
  2. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    That's a tough question, especially as we don't know you or what past experience you have or what your life's ambitions are.

    They are all perfectly valid paths to take. The question is, what path are *you* interested in?
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  3. MASTER J

    MASTER J New Member

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    I'm not sure really! I am a creative person who tends to edge in the designing part of thing IE: WEB DESIGNER. But i am not too sure about the job prospects of this path.

    I have looked into abit of software programming field to which sounds intresting too.

    But again i am really not sure where to be!

    I know that i want a career in IT couse its the only thing that i am intersted in and the only thing that i am really any good at. But its only the last couple of months that i have been looking at IT as a career path as i have always seen it as more of a hobby thing.
     
  4. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Firstly, there is a life away from a computer screen - Or so I have been told :D

    Well unfortunately the bubble burst a long time ago, for the IT industry as a whole. Now jobs are far more scarce than they were and there is no guarantee of a job in any sector, well not that I am aware of.

    My advice would be to go in a direction where you have a natural edge, a talent if you see what I mean. There is so much to learn and the competition is so tough that it is not advisable to embark on a profession that you are going to struggle to keep up with. Go with with whatever inspires you but bear in mind that with IT, it is a never ending learning experience. If you think you are going to get bored with continual study, well then you are barking up the wrong tree.

    To succeed in IT, you need a strong commitment, an undying passion and the motivation to learn new things continuously.

    Pete
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  5. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    WOW! Well said Pete! :thumbleft
     
  6. Pete01

    Pete01 Kilobyte Poster

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    Be careful before signing away a lot of money and don't fall for any 'get certified quick and straight into a high paid job' pitches. Have a look at some career paths and entry level positions for them. It's ultimately up to you what direction you take. Where would you like to see yourself in 5-10 years time?

    If you have no experience do A+ either way but if you really aren't sure what field of IT you're ready to decide on don't get sold into a long term expensive course that could potentially be the direction you don't want to go in.

    If you like creativity and web design by all means have a look into development and design. Check out the open university, you don't have to take a full degree but you can make your own (like pizza) degree/diploma etc as you go along and find more subjects you're interested in. There is also no commitment to spend £1000's and decide on your study route at the very beginning.
     
    Certifications: MCP (NT4) CCNA
    WIP: 70-669, Learning MSI packaging
  7. d-Faktor
    Honorary Member

    d-Faktor R.I.P - gone but never forgotten.

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    it's difficult to give you advice there, master j. it's like saying you'd like to do something related to the movie business, but you're not sure whether you want to be an actor, the projector operator at the local theatre, or a movie critic. similarly, you can't compare webdesign, programming and a+. even though they are part of the same industry, they're completely different fields with different requirements, a different crowd, different payment, etc.

    once you know which direction you'd like to be going, we may be able to help you choose a path that leads in that direction. but our advice cannot (and should not) concern that first choice of direction. that's really up to you.
     
  8. MASTER J

    MASTER J New Member

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    Thanks guys, some useful advice their.

    I'm still not sure what area to train in, suppose I should take my time and make the right choice.
     
  9. MASTER J

    MASTER J New Member

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    Ok 1 more question too ask.

    I have herd a lot of bad press of computeach and don’t want to make a mistake and losing ££££ in the process. So can any one tell me any good value for money learning companies out there?
    Is ICS learning any good?

    Thank You
     
  10. Pete01

    Pete01 Kilobyte Poster

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    Buy the A+ book

    Read it.

    Make your decision from there.

    Get rich(certified) quick is a myth that training companies are really playing at the moment.

    You're worth more with knowledge and no certs than you are with an MCSE and your tongue hanging out..
     
    Certifications: MCP (NT4) CCNA
    WIP: 70-669, Learning MSI packaging
  11. dotnetms

    dotnetms Bit Poster

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    If you like networking, go for CCNA/CCNP..
    Cisco networking path

    Google Cisco Certification

    Cheers!

    John
     
  12. Disco25

    Disco25 Bit Poster

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    You say it's the one thing you're good at Master J but what do you have experience of doing with computers? Have you built any? Used any Web Design software? Done any programming?

    You may want to consider starting at the bottom with a large Services company like Fujitsu or ATOS, they usually employ onto their helpdesks, will give you a name on your CV and a start and they usually offer support towards Microsoft Certs. I started with Fujitsu when i wanted a foot in the door. Gives you good exposure to the industry and when it's quiet you can study.

    I personally found programming boring and prefer the hands on support that goes with desktops and networks. Other people will lean toward programming but you very rarely know which way you will lean when starting out.
     
  13. Keimos

    Keimos Byte Poster

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    Hi Master J,

    Firstly, what do you like doing with computers? (apart from playing games)

    Secondly, who has made you think this way? (People in IT earn there money for a reason)

    Thirdly - Programming - have you tried it? if not buy a book

    Fourthly - What does the inside of you computer look like - buy a book

    fifthly - have you tried web design? (buy a book)

    As above to some extent but you need to make sure that what you go into is something that you enjoy and can do. Your original question indicates to me that you have been talking to people who are suggesting stuff because they think you are on computers all the time. I would guess that you are a gamer and fairly clued up on how to use a computer but thats where is becomes unstuck.

    Let us know where you are and where you want to get to so that we can provide you with better than guesses. Do not commit to any training until you are 100% certain as to what you want to do.

    Keith
     
    Certifications: Microsoft Office Specialist
  14. MASTER J

    MASTER J New Member

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    I have made website (none online at moment) and I used dreamweaver mx. I currently have and am using fierworks mx for the graphics’ and dreamweaver mx 2004 and am trying to learn Flash mx pro 2004. I also have a book on dreamweaver.

    Can you have a career with web designing?
     
  15. d-Faktor
    Honorary Member

    d-Faktor R.I.P - gone but never forgotten.

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    yes, but because the web design market is fairly saturated, you will have to be a) really good, and/or b) get with a design firm.
     
  16. jodsclass

    jodsclass Byte Poster

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    Hi There.

    I have a degree in Web Design and there is much more to it than learning the Macromedia suite of tools. You need to understand how to code. There are various markup languages you should learn including xhtml, xml, html, asp and php. You should also learn CSS as it is a must in web design at the moment.

    There are also many theoretical knowledge areas including accessibility, usability, standards complaince etc.

    You should have a good working knowledge of how both Windows & *nix webservers operate, and som idea how to set up Sql databases.

    There is alot to learn if you want a career in web design. I am fully qualified in this field now but the jobs are few and far between and the requirements are often excessive for the pay rate. I have a degree in web design along with 4 years of web design experience for companies and I have found it so hard to land a job in Web design i have shifted back to the hardware side of IT. If you have a natural flare for web design (and make sure you do before paying out any cash for uni or similar courses) then follow this path, however if you simply have an interest in web design it may be worthwhile buying a couple of books and making sure you can code.

    there are so many aspects to web design nowadays that only the cream of the crop seem to suceed.

    Not meaning to put you off this career, jsut give it some serious thought before you invest thousands of pounds (my degree has cost me almost £20k, I'm Graduating with a 1st class honours and I havent received a single graduate interview.

    Good luck mate, best advice would be to think about what you enjoy most about IT, either hardware, networks or design, and take it from there.

    Jodsclass
     
    Certifications: BSc IT & Web Development
    WIP: MSc Advanced Computing, Oracle Cert
  17. MASTER J

    MASTER J New Member

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    Thanks jobsclass good advice and I will think hard, I’ve herd I a lot of stories out there with people losing money and so on... That’s why I’m trying to ask as many questions as i can.

    I appreciate all the help!
     
  18. jodsclass

    jodsclass Byte Poster

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    Your very welcome mate. I have been through the whole web design degree process and whilst a degree looks good on your CV for most jobs, it means very little in IT. Its the old catch 22, you can have every cert and degree there is, but cant get employment because you have no experience. And the problem is you cant get the experience because you have no experience. definately the best thing to do is hobby it at home until you have your direction, then get into a company at the bottom, possibly helpdesk (such as an isp call centre etc).

    If you do want to get into web design ill give you as much advice as I can, but I honestly wouldnt take it at degree level, its very theoretical and not very hands on, most of my skill is self taught, backed up by the uni theory.

    jodsclass
     
    Certifications: BSc IT & Web Development
    WIP: MSc Advanced Computing, Oracle Cert
  19. Keimos

    Keimos Byte Poster

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    Hi Master J,

    Do not be put off by jodsclass. ((Sorry, but its not a good arguement, there are to many successful people out there without degrees. Degrees, as good as they should be, tend to be to multifocused with no specialisation and also rely on individual preferences, just getting a degree or really, really interested) IT has one thing in common, the computer and what you can do with it. Nobody in the world will ever master everything, so you as a person have to take out of whats available and suits you and then build on it))


    A degree helps but does nothing for a career in web design. You have to built up a portfolio of work that is acceptable to the people looking to employ you. They do not look at the design (most people can do that), they look at the code and construction of the site.

    jodsclass is absolutley right in that you have to know what you are doing, but the bottom line you also need an eye or feel for it to be succcessful. We have all read or seen about the wonder kids, they are few and far between and generally never last.

    Fact: The most successful designers are aged between 35 - 45.

    Going back to your original topic, go with what you feel you are good at. Then get really good at it. Other things will occur naturally as you gain experience and learn more.

    Basically, there is no quick fix


    Q. If everything on the high street was saturated, why do all the clothes shops sell the same things?

    Business is business, if you have an idea and think you can do it better?

    If you just want to be paid, join the masses.

    Keimos
     
    Certifications: Microsoft Office Specialist
  20. jodsclass

    jodsclass Byte Poster

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    Sorry if this came across wrong, but I was getting at the fact that a degree in this field is less useful than experience, and is a costly process. I was actually trying to tell MASTER to avoid a degree and get some other certs. Even a college course would be better as they often pay you to attend at his age, and they often at least get you some experience if not a junior role.

    Jodsclass
     
    Certifications: BSc IT & Web Development
    WIP: MSc Advanced Computing, Oracle Cert

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