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Help Guys Need Some Advice On Where To Look For A Entry Level Job

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by Marvel Marcus, Jun 7, 2009.

  1. Marvel Marcus

    Marvel Marcus New Member

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    Hey all i am seeking an IT trainee/Apprenticeship/Junior job.

    I don't have no qualifications what so ever and i been looking for an A + course and i found on, i am apply to start in September.

    I have been working in admin for the past 4 yrs and started in an apprenticeship and progressed but i wound like to change my career as I really enjoy supporting others in IT and doing IT related work (fiddling with networks, removing viruses and bugs, fixing laptops, setting up wireless and wired networks for friends and family)

    Can anyone tell me a good place to look for an entry level IT job In or around London?

    I am very eager to learn new skills and am a very fast learner

    Thanks

    MM
     
    Certifications: None need help with this LOL
    WIP: i wanna get MCSA, MCSE, CCNA
  2. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Have you checked out this website? This website will help you search and apply for an Apprenticeship vacancy, it's available for anyone who is searching for an Apprenticeship vacancy.

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  3. Marvel Marcus

    Marvel Marcus New Member

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    cheers wagnerk

    i found some positions on there that are very interesting.

    any more mate lol (I Know i am pushing it lol)

    MM:D
     
    Certifications: None need help with this LOL
    WIP: i wanna get MCSA, MCSE, CCNA
  4. neutralhills

    neutralhills Kilobyte Poster

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    Speaking as an employer, I'll be 100% honest with you. Any resume or cover letter that comes across my desk with such appallingly bad English will automatically be rubbished. You would stand no chance being hired in my shop as I wouldn't make it to the second paragraph of your resume. I have a seven year old daughter in grade two who knows not to say "don't have no" for crying out loud.

    Proper English is a professional qualification. You may want to start working on yours.
     
    Certifications: Lots.
    WIP: Upgrading MS certs
  5. Josiahb

    Josiahb Gigabyte Poster

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    Whilst harshly put neutralhills comment does have some merit, in IT particularly (in my opinion) good English is vital, dealing with technical terminology becomes a lot simpler when the non-technical language is properly rendered.

    As for the original question, grabbing that entry level job is all about getting your name out there, send your CV off to everyone. A well written CV with a good covering letter will get you to the top of the pile when the IT manager is looking to hire.
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, MCDST, ACA – Mac Integration 10.10
  6. neutralhills

    neutralhills Kilobyte Poster

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    In IT we not only have to maintain systems and solve problems, but we have to document our efforts. The hallmark of a truly skilled IT professional is the documentation he leaves in his trail.

    All of the computers I work on in my store have a plastic envelope adhered to the side of the tower. Every time I work on the system I type up service notes and put them in that envelope. The next time I, or any other tech has to work on that system there are immediately available records saying what was done and when.

    There is no way I would consider hiring anyone who could not meet my standards for providing customers with good documentation on the work done in my shop. The last time I hired an employee the very first step was tossing out the resumes with poor spelling and grammar. It was only on the second run through that I started to look at their experience with computers.
     
    Certifications: Lots.
    WIP: Upgrading MS certs
  7. ericrollo

    ericrollo Megabyte Poster

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    I agree with that to a point depends how picky you are being. Forums are not really a good way to measure someones spelling.
     
    Certifications: MOS Master, A+, MCP 271
    WIP: HND, Programming, Another Job
  8. neutralhills

    neutralhills Kilobyte Poster

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    I'm charging people $75/hr in shop rates and $110/hr in travel rates to fix their kit, and I'm doing this in the middle of the worst economic downturn I've personally experienced in my 40 years on this earth. So I do everything I can to present a professional image to customers I very badly want to keep.

    I and my employees dress neatly for work. We use clean language. We use proper English. We're friendly, courteous, and supportive to our customers. And we carefully document our solutions in a clear, readable manner.

    This is where I'm coming from. I'm aware that I'm a small store in a rural area, but last I checked, it was businesses like mine that are actually creating growth in the economy right now. So I'd like to think my opinion has some merit.

    And now some questions for others here, which hopefully pertains to the topic of this thread. How many of the users here have had to obtain support from a vendor only to be completely turned off by the person at the other end of the phone speaking unintelligible English? How many have been turned off by completely inadequate documentation for a product that was obviously written by a non-English speaker? How many want to do business with that company in the future if there's an alternative vendor to try with comparable products and prices?

    The ability to communicate effectively in both speech and writing is absolutely critical in this lousy economy. The better you are at it, the more attractive you are to employers and the more useful you are in the workplace. I don't think it's possible to under emphasize this, to be honest with you.
     
    Certifications: Lots.
    WIP: Upgrading MS certs
  9. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

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    That could possibly depend on the forum. Certforums has a few pitchfork-wielding grammatical evangelists :tune that don't often let things slip :)

    And I am referring to myself there!
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  10. VantageIsle

    VantageIsle Kilobyte Poster

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    Perhaps we should all take a note of the above.

    I have watched my manager tut and hiss through CVs with poor spelling and grammatical errors. It's worth asking a friend to proofread you CV, an extra pair of eyes may spot an obvious goof that may prevent your application from being dismissed.

    I think I was hired because I stated I waz gud wid compooters on my CV :biggrin

    (really though, don't underestimate how serious IT managers take this subject)
     
    Certifications: A+, ITIL V3, MCSA, MCITP:EST, CCENT, 70-432-SQL, 70-401 SCCM
    WIP: MCSA upgrade MCITP:SA then EA
  11. VantageIsle

    VantageIsle Kilobyte Poster

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    ^Ha, I mixed up you and your!
     
    Certifications: A+, ITIL V3, MCSA, MCITP:EST, CCENT, 70-432-SQL, 70-401 SCCM
    WIP: MCSA upgrade MCITP:SA then EA

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