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hello i need some advice

Discussion in 'New Members Introduction' started by gwop, Jul 25, 2007.

  1. gwop

    gwop New Member

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    Hello 1st post here

    I have recently completed the COMPTIA A+ and Network + certifications and am not sure what my next step should be.

    I originally wanted to get into 1st line support, and was thinking of doing an MCP like the MCDST to help improve my employment options.

    Does anyone know of a good quality London company which does the MCDST in London or would i be better off going the self study route and taking the exam when i feel like i am ready.

    So far i have only 6 months post certification experience in a semi IT role under my belt, working as part of the technical support/customer service team in a specialist IT company.

    What else could i do to help me progress my career in IT. Currently i am still not sure what field I would like to specialise in so any suggestion would be greatly appreciated.
     
    Certifications: A+, Network +
    WIP: MCDST?
  2. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Hi welcome :D

    Most people on here would advocate self study as training providers are a bit of a rip off.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  3. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Insert Standard Response 3:

    Self-study is definitely the way to go.

    Welcome!
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  4. gwop

    gwop New Member

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    Thank you for the advice

    When i first started looking for certification courses i also found training providers like Joskos and Microsoft student campus to be very dodgy. But i done my A+ N+ certification at the college connected to my uni. For £400 including exam fees but not course materials it was a good price, although I had to do alot of self study as well but i found i learn better with the hands on approach rather than from a book or in a lecture.
     
    Certifications: A+, Network +
    WIP: MCDST?
  5. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Buy an old pc from a recycling place or junk shop for a about 20 quid then you can do your hands on stuff in your house :D

    Thats what i do.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  6. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    One more piece of advice... keep looking for that entry-level job. While certifications can certainly make you look more valuable to an employer, having too many certifications without experience can sometimes be a detriment. Certifications are great, but they're not the magic key to getting a job.

    EDIT: Oops - looks like you've already got 6 months under your belt... keep at it! :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  7. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Greetings. Experience is the best thing you can do for your career and you're doing it. Take a look at what you do on the job and take a look at your cert options. Also, think about what you want to be doing for your next job and the job after that and so on.

    Start where you are which probably has something to do with supporting Windows on the desktop. Certifications have to do with telling the world you already have a certain set of skills. You've probably correctly assessed your next step which is the MCDST. Link your experience and your education. After that, where you go is up to you.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  8. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

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    How many standard responses do you have? :D

    Welcome to CF gwop 8)
     
    Certifications: SIA DS Licence
    WIP: A+ 2009
  9. gwop

    gwop New Member

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    Yeah thats how i passed my A+ with the help of my broken down P3 from Tiny that was gathering dust.

    I will Purchase some books and get cracking on the MCDST, i have been applying for the entry level 1st line support jobs with no luck so far, my current job role is half admin half technical adviser but i would like to move into a full support role.

    Also i was thinking about learning a programming language, but as a beginner what would be a good starting place. HTML then Java script? or do i have the complete wrong end of the stick.

    Thanks for your advice once again in advance
     
    Certifications: A+, Network +
    WIP: MCDST?
  10. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    I wouldnt consider HTML a programming language its too simplistic try basic or c++ they are programming languages i hate them because i am crap at coding.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  11. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Well, let's see... there's one for:

    - recommending self study over expensive classroom-based training
    - explaining that you can't learn everything you need to know to be a good tech in a few short weeks
    - recommending that you wait to get experience before going after the CCNA/CCNP/CCIE/MCSA/MCSE/CISSP/other higher-level certification
    - recommending A+, then Network+ and/or MCDST to people starting out in IT
    - recommending that you should get experience before going after a network admin job
    - recommending that you should get experience before going after a job doing IT security
    - explaining that experience is more valuable than degrees or certifications
    - explaining that certifications and degrees are not the magic key to getting an IT job
    - explaining that everyone starts out at the bottom (unless you're extremely lucky or have an uncle who is an IT director)...but nobody said you have to stay there forever
    - recommending MS Press and Sybex for Microsoft exams
    - recommending Cisco Press and Sybex for Cisco exams
    - recommending Meyers A+ All-in-One 6th Ed and Pyles PC Technician Street Smarts for A+
    - recommending Sybex for Network+
    - recommending Syngress for Security+
    - recommending Oracle Press for Oracle
    - stating my opinion is heavily biased when it comes to practice exam or router simulator recommendations
    - stating that a practice exam can only accurately gauge your abilities the first time you see a bank of unique test questions
    - stating that the Cisco Confidentiality Agreement states that you cannot reveal even the most basic information about an exam
    - stating that braindumps aren't allowed on the forum
    - stating why braindumps hurt the industry
    - stating why braindumps hurt the user of the braindump
    - stating that job "guarantees" made by training providers aren't usually worth the paper they're written on

    ...and that's just the start...

    ...I'd say I'm building a list to rival Lefler's Laws or the Ferengi Rules of Acquisition. :deal
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  12. gwop

    gwop New Member

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    Thanks for advice i know little to none about programming but need to learn. Would the two languages mentioned be a good starting point.
     
    Certifications: A+, Network +
    WIP: MCDST?
  13. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    As a programmer I would first ask - what is your goal here?

    Basic (as in Visi-basic) is not a good introduction if you intend to be a serious programmer, as it allows/teaches sloppy habits. It is fine if your programming is going to be casual.

    C++ is a beast of a language - huge and not easy for a beginner.

    There are a very large number of languages out there, and each has its strengths and weaknesses.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+

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