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Have I blown (missed) my chances to work in IT?

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by jo74, Jun 5, 2011.

  1. jo74

    jo74 Byte Poster

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    It's a few years since I (belatedly) gained my IT tech certs, I've not yet found an IT job and nor (to my persistent regret) have I done any IT voluntary work (missed my chance there, my own fault).

    And I've only worked in a few temping jobs. So not only am I concerned with gap since certification, but the gap since a regular job (though it's been partially filled with courses and some office voluntary work).

    Maybe I've also been guilty, as my past threads will suggest, of being distracted by things like programming and SQL (even at the time of writing I'm tempted by programming again :oops:).

    In the short run, I'm in two minds actually - I've either been considering exam 70-270 (and/or maybe the CCENT) to resurrect my IT ambitions (and finally doing some IT voluntary work, if possible) or even
    considering abandoning any IT tech ambitions for a few years or even altogether.

    Although as I'm in the middle of an Open University degree, I'm thinking that perhaps I should concentrate on that and then go for an IT tech job once I graduate.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, Sec+
    WIP: CCENT, CCNA
  2. pete.grant

    pete.grant Byte Poster

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    It sounds like you don't really know what to do and until you decide I would imagine you will remain in exactly the same position.

    Also bear in mind that certification is aimed at IT professionals who currently work with the specific technology and who wish to prove their competancy. Certification should not be used just to bulk out a CV in the hope of impressing prospective employers.

    Bottom line is experience is key, which I know is difficult when you don't have any and are trying to get your foot on the ladder so I have every sympathy for you!
     
    Certifications: A+ IT Technician, CCENT, CEH, CPTS, CIW Security Analyst, ITIL v3 Foundation, Master CIW Administrator, MCITP (Windows Server 2008:SA), MCSA on Windows Server 2008, MCSA:Security on Windows Server 2003, MCTS (70-648, 70-652), Network+, SCNS, Security+, Server+
  3. jo74

    jo74 Byte Poster

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    Thanks for the reply.

    And yes I don't know what to do, that's why I started the thread!

    As I pointed out in my original post, I am too tempted by alternatives such as programming.

    So perhaps I should just focus on IT tech for a career and relegate programming to a (occasional) hobby.

    But should it be delayed till I've graduated with the OU?

    I mentioned 70-270 because I couldn't afford the MCDST before its retirement and I have a set of books for 70-270, so I'm reluctant to buy books for an MCTS exam for Vista.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2011
    Certifications: A+, N+, Sec+
    WIP: CCENT, CCNA
  4. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

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    Yeah i agree with Pete, for success you need to focus your energies into one area, so you need to make a choice but make the choice the one you enjoy the most, as if you really want to do programming then you will probably have more motivation, and it is needed trust me!
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal
  5. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    You can take entry level certifications like A+ to help your chances of landing an IT job. MCDST is for desktop support and although its entry, you still want to have some experience. With that said, I did my MCDST when I had 1 year experience and it was an easy exam to do. If you enjoy programming more than I would say pursue that as you might be better off. Either way it's not too late.
     
    Certifications: A+ | CCA | CCAA | Network+ | MCDST | MCSA | MCP (270, 271, 272, 290, 291) | MCTS (70-662, 70-663) | MCITP:EMA | VCA-DCV/Cloud/WM | VTSP | VCP5-DT | VCP5-DCV
    WIP: VCAP5-DCA/DCD | EMCCA
  6. jo74

    jo74 Byte Poster

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    Already got the A+, 2 years ago. Thought it was too late for the MCDST?
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, Sec+
    WIP: CCENT, CCNA
  7. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    My bad, didn't see your sig. I don't think it's too late for MCDST.... In fact, you can do your MCDST and then upgrade to Windows 7 MCITP.
     
    Certifications: A+ | CCA | CCAA | Network+ | MCDST | MCSA | MCP (270, 271, 272, 290, 291) | MCTS (70-662, 70-663) | MCITP:EMA | VCA-DCV/Cloud/WM | VTSP | VCP5-DT | VCP5-DCV
    WIP: VCAP5-DCA/DCD | EMCCA
  8. DryPlate

    DryPlate Nibble Poster

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    MCDST expires on June 30th. Don't forget there are two tests, you can get a free retake if you fail but you still need to make sure you have time to take and pass the exams.

    You should at least be able to get a part-time job while you're in school.. that will help you have experience when you graduate and also meet contacts to network with.
     
    Certifications: CompTIA A+, MCDST, Apple Certified Associate
    WIP: CompTIA Network+, MCITP: EDST 7
  9. jo74

    jo74 Byte Poster

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    I'm not in school (you mean University), I'm doing a part-time distance learning degree with the Open University.

    Given the current economic climate in the U.K finding a part-time job isn't easy. Even finding voluntary work isn't that easy.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2011
    Certifications: A+, N+, Sec+
    WIP: CCENT, CCNA
  10. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    No you havent blown your chances but you should stop worrying about some of the stuff you have asked questions about because they are not relevant.

    You need to make sure you are applying for jobs that reflect your experience level.

    You need to keep trying, it took me a long time as it did others you have to keep at it.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  11. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    you know you dont have to sepcifically work part time in IT to get contacts within the IT world don't you? you get get a part time job in an office doing temp work or something let them know your interested in IT you never know what may come of it.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  12. Saftlad

    Saftlad New Member

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    I can't offer you any advice, as I am in a similar boat. On the plus side though, you do have age on your side.

    My situation is somewhat similar in that I qualified MCSE on NT4 in 99 and got into desktop support, then sys admin. Moved job to London and worked in a datacentre for a while, progressing up the corporate ladder to become a manager. Moved jobs again back to the South coast looking after a service desk. That job moved out of country and I was fortunate enough to move into Service Management. 5 years later, and we moved to the South West, where IT is a bit quieter :cry: I've now been a Fitness Instructor and PT for 3 years but following another home move, I'm going to get back into my quali's and get another IT job. It's a lot easier on the body when you're over 40 lol.

    So, as with yourself, I have some old certs and a lot of experience, but nothing within the last few years. So I've just got the books for 640, 642, 646, and 680 and plan to get these exams out of the way whilst I try to find a job. My quandary is whether to play on my (ancient) experience and push for a 2nd line job, in line with my exam aspirations, or try and get a 1st line job to get my foot in the door...

    Either way, I guess my only advice to you would be to go with the quali that you most enjoy doing. All roles have their downside, but it's easier to deal with that when you really enjoy the good times. You tend to learn it quicker too.
     
    WIP: 70-640, 70-642, 70-646, 70-680
  13. jo74

    jo74 Byte Poster

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    But I don't have any experience (as I implied in my OP). And not much work at all recently.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, Sec+
    WIP: CCENT, CCNA
  14. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Read what I put.

    You dont have to have to have worked in IT to work in IT.

    You can build contacts through admin jobs and office jobs, can let those employers know that your really interest in working in IT you never know you may get a chance to help out after hours or something. And if you prove yourself get an IT job.

    Took me 8 years to get into IT with a 3 year break because I was really pissed off it took wagnerk 5 years.

    make sure you are applying for jobs that relate to your experience level which is none so you should be looking at 1st line entry level support or trainee helpdesk or tech jobs.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  15. jo74

    jo74 Byte Poster

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    Thanks for that post. I'm certianly not going to apply for jobs above my level

    Perhaps my problem is not so much that I think the glass is half empty as there's no glass at all.:dry
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2011
    Certifications: A+, N+, Sec+
    WIP: CCENT, CCNA
  16. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Maybe you should stop thinking that full stop.

    Tip: get the yellow pages, pick out as many companies as you can think off that may use computers and need someone to support them, write a genric letter saying your interested in IT and that you want to work as an IT tech or in support, print out your CV and send the generic letter and cv to all the companies you picked out.

    You dont have to apply to big businesses or IT related businesses, just about everyone uses computers these days and most will have a small to medium sized network.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  17. jo74

    jo74 Byte Poster

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    Ironically, minutes after my last post to this thread, my PC went on the 'blink' and I had to spend the rest of the afternoon sorting that out, which meant digging out my A+ books.

    So I've ended up revitilising my IT studies. :D
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, Sec+
    WIP: CCENT, CCNA
  18. sallicko

    sallicko New Member

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    Hello jo74,

    I just want to say if you are thinking about doing some voluntary work, you can go to your local CAB, it is a fantastic place for getting IT experience and you will be surrounded by other volunteers (at least for me guaranteed pleasant company & customers everyday). When I initially went there they said there was no such support work available, I did not believe them and went in with my own ideas to improve their technology services - which I did, 'availability' in particular.

    There must be lots of place to gain experience, my first experience of IT Support was on a european exchange programme in Italy, to give you an idea of the opportunities.

    That 70-270 cert and some voluntary experience is probably a good starting place - definitely highlights enthusiasm, motivation and desire.

    I am sure there are plenty of people here who will support you getting into IT, on all aspects of it.

    Then again A+, N+, Sec+ is more than I have, you could start in a 1st line support role.

    Certs will stay with you, I would not worry about how far back you did them, you can still say "I got N+" and not "I got N+ in 2005".
     
  19. systempsyche

    systempsyche Nibble Poster

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    as previously said , you need to focus on what you want to do. You should without a doubt get a voulntary job in IT, they are always available, use a free classified site to post your availability. Some voluntary IT work you could even do from home.
     
    Certifications: A+, network+, server+, mcdst, mcp, ccent
    WIP: mac integration, ACSP, ACTC
  20. jo74

    jo74 Byte Poster

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    I've asked at the CAB but they'd taken on several 'future jobs fund' people (long term unemployed), including an IT guy, and they've already got other IT volunteers, so there's simply little chance of volunteering in IT there.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, Sec+
    WIP: CCENT, CCNA

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