1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Hardware Firewall

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by michael78, Jan 25, 2006.

  1. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

    2,085
    29
    141
    I've Decided to go down the hardware route after my subscription is up for my firewall software. As my linksys router's firewall is very basic I want to buy a dedicated/better configurable firewall and came across a belkin one which looks good Link for the price. Has anyone got any advice on this, are belkin firewall's good? One problem I'll have is that my modem has a wireless point on it which my laptop uses so it will be exposed as it will be in front of the firewall so I'll have to buy a wireless AP to go behind the firewall.
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  2. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

    5,726
    175
    221
    whats your interpretation of a hardware firewall?
    at the end of the day all firewalls are just software logic, wheather on ASIC chips or installed on top of a linux system (one of the most used firewalls around is just software on top of a linux OS)

    Is the belkin one not likely to be as basic as the linksys? or is it actually a dedicated firewall device rather than an add on to a router?
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, VCP
    WIP: > 0
  3. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

    2,085
    29
    141
    Sorry Phoenix, what I meant is that I wanted an appliance firewall. I done a search on firewall's and the netgear one is from what I gather a firewall first and a router/hub second. My linksys one is very very basic and can't really be configured very much. I've heard netgear are pretty good for the price.
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  4. eyeball

    eyeball Nibble Poster

    82
    3
    0
    Looks ok, is it a fairly new product out? Can't find any reviews about it really.
     
    Certifications: A+, Network +, MCSA
    WIP: CCNA, MCSE+security
  5. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

    2,085
    29
    141
    Does anyone have a netgear firewall and if so what are your thoughts on it?
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  6. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

    6,281
    85
    174
    If you have an old PC kicking around, and some space you could go for smoothwall
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  7. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

    2,085
    29
    141
    I did think about using a linux firewall as I have Ubuntu on an old PC but didn't want to keep the PC on all the time.
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  8. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

    6,281
    85
    174
    Yeah, fair point....
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  9. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

    2,085
    29
    141
    I'm just as confused as hell with all these different Netgear devices. I think netgear must bring out a new model every 30 seconds...:rolleyes:
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  10. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

    6,281
    85
    174
    Have you looked at Zyxel?

    Good value, stable and really good configuration...
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  11. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

    2,085
    29
    141
    Cheers for that Boyce, i'm always open to suggestions. You don't have any links to places that sell them? I've been on their website and it doesn't have European reseller on there.
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  12. Notes_Bloke

    Notes_Bloke Terabyte Poster

    3,230
    54
    146
    Hi Slypie,
    Have a look Here for a Zyxel appliances.

    HTH
    NB :)
     
    Certifications: 70-210, 70-215, A+,N+, Security+
    WIP: MCSA
  13. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

    4,196
    171
    211
    course, you only need the firewall running as long as you need access to the internet. since it sits between your network and the outside world, shutting it down when you turn off your pc's further disconnects your pc from malicious outside sources
     
    Certifications: ITIL Foundation; MCTS: Visual Studio Team Foundation Server 2010, Administration
    WIP: None at present
  14. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

    6,281
    85
    174
    Yeah, as Fergal said, you only need the PC on as long as your network needs to be connected....
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  15. The_Geek

    The_Geek Megabyte Poster

    772
    13
    64
    Yeah, it was expensive, but I like my Cisco Pix firewall.

    Well......expensive for the company.....they bought it for me.
     
    Certifications: CompTIA and Micro$oft
    WIP: PDI+
  16. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

    3,661
    106
    167
    Since this firewall appears to be for your home network smoothwall on an old PC will work very well. It will run on a 486 with 32 or 64 megs of ram, at least I believe so, with suffiecient performance for a home internet connection. You could find an old AMD or Pentium and it would work very well. It would only require a couple of nics and a small hard drive as it only needs a few megs of install space, and you don't need a monitor or mouse for it if your hardware will boot without them.

    You could build/buy something like that for less than you could get one of the more expensive Netgear, Linksys, Zyxel routers designed for SOHO usage, and have a commercial/enterprise class firewall. That seems like a lot of bang for the buck to me....
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1

Share This Page

Loading...