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Gonna Start Windows 2008 MCSA Need some advice :)

Discussion in 'Windows Server 2003 / 2008 / 2012 Exams' started by J1mmyc, Jul 10, 2012.

  1. J1mmyc

    J1mmyc Bit Poster

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    hi all right im about to take my 70-682 exam to bring my MCDST up to date and then plan on starting microsofts new MCSA 2008 70-640,70-642,70-646 i just want to know is this

    1. Is it good path to go as i want to learn about servers

    2. Should i forget Win 2008 and just start Win 2012

    3. How many hours will i need to get up to a good knowledgable standard on Win2008 (ive never done any server work before ill be starting from scratch)

    Any advice will be helpful :)
     
    Certifications: A+,MCDST
  2. AdamV

    AdamV Bit Poster

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    If you achieve the MCSA: Server 2008 then you can upgrade to MCSA: Server 2012 with exam 417, available sometime later this year.

    Right now courses and books on Server 2012 are bound to be thin on the ground, so rather than waiting, get started on 2008. There's obviously a whole load of overlap between the versions, especially in foundational topics such as networking, AD fundamentals, local server stuff (good ol' NTFS and share permissions!)

    If you have zero experience of server stuff it's hard to say how long this would take. How long did your MCDST take you?
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCSA:Messaging 2003, MCTS:Dynamics CRM 4.0 and 2011; MOS: Master Instructor 2003, 2007
    WIP: Writing CRM 2013 Customization course. Planning to take all CRM 2013 exams ASAP
  3. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    If you're looking to work with Windows servers than this is definitely the right path... I think it's good to do the Windows Server 2008 track regardless of Windows Server 2012. Either way you can also upgrade and Window Server 2008 will probably stick for a little while so it will benefit you.

    As to how long it takes, well that depends on you, how much you already know and how you study for exams. Usually takes me about 2 months of studies per exam although I don't study everyday, usually around 3-4 times a week.

    Start with the 70-682 and see how it goes. Also the 70-680 is a good exam to do, its a bit difficult but it will give you some understanding of what the server exams are like.

    Good luck!
     
    Certifications: A+ | CCA | CCAA | Network+ | MCDST | MCSA | MCP (270, 271, 272, 290, 291) | MCTS (70-662, 70-663) | MCITP:EMA | VCA-DCV/Cloud/WM | VTSP | VCP5-DT | VCP5-DCV
    WIP: VCAP5-DCA/DCD | EMCCA
  4. J1mmyc

    J1mmyc Bit Poster

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    the MCDST exam took me around 6-7 months but had previous experience with XP so wasnt that bad. I will be starting Server 2008 from absolute scratch i will probs have about 10-12 hours per week to study will this be enough? Ive learnt and done test exams on the 70-680 and 70-685 as the 70-682 is mix of both so ive studied both.
     
    Certifications: A+,MCDST
  5. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    Sorry to throw a spanner in the works here but... no I don't think it's a good idea. The idea behind the certification is to prove your ability not to get you started on the product.

    It's been my experience that people with no skills in Server work (NT4, 2003 and 2008 R2) who attempt the exams either end up dejected by them failing the exams repeatedly or start to use braindumps to cheat their way through the exam track. Neither of which are beneficial to the person taking the exams.

    In my opinion you would be better off working with the product, gaining experience before attempting the exams, especially if it took you 6 - 7 months to pass the MCDST with experience.
     
    Certifications: CNA | CNE | CCNA | MCP | MCP+I | MCSE NT4 | MCSA 2003 | Security+ | MCSA:S 2003 | MCSE:S 2003 | MCTS:SCCM 2007 | MCTS:Win 7 | MCITP:EDA7 | MCITP:SA | MCITP:EA | MCTS:Hyper-V | VCP 4 | ITIL v3 Foundation | VCP 5 DCV | VCP 5 Cloud | VCP6 NV | VCP6 DCV | VCAP 5.5 DCA
    WIP: VCP6-CMA, VCAP-DCD and Linux + (and possibly VCIX-NV).
  6. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    I probably should of been more clear... but yes for sure, the experience needs to come first before attempting these certs. But it is the right path in terms of certifications, that's what I did when I started to gain experience with Windows Server.
     
    Certifications: A+ | CCA | CCAA | Network+ | MCDST | MCSA | MCP (270, 271, 272, 290, 291) | MCTS (70-662, 70-663) | MCITP:EMA | VCA-DCV/Cloud/WM | VTSP | VCP5-DT | VCP5-DCV
    WIP: VCAP5-DCA/DCD | EMCCA
  7. Dray

    Dray New Member

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    A good way to get into servers is at home , and with virtualization, your laughing, get a good cross reference (courseware, self-study book) related to 70-640 to work with, and drop yourself in the deep end, you soon gain confidence, I would even have a hybrid rig at home 2003/2008r2/2012, I was taught the ol school way, forget the manuel, learn the product then do the exams , but it sometimes doesn't go that way. If you need any help pm me, I might have some good resources or someone here may help you.
     
    Certifications: Alot
  8. onoski

    onoski Terabyte Poster

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    Get as much hands on practical experience with the product and read white papers including watching CBT videos. Ultimately, experience is the name of the game and would get further.
     
    Certifications: MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003 Messaging, MCP, HNC BIT, ITIL Fdn V3, SDI Fdn, VCP 4 & VCP 5
    WIP: MCTS:70-236, PowerShell
  9. The Zig

    The Zig Kilobyte Poster Forum Leader

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    Two points to make in this thread.

    1) The server 2008 exams are tricky. I had a 2008R2 server in my class which I was looking after but was in use (i.e. I couldn't bugger about with it too much!) and also I got a 2008R2 .iso off the Microsoft site (the trial version is free) and VMware player (also free). The real server was good in that I actually had to do real tasks and solve real problems with it. On the virtual servers I made with VMware player I created domains, DCs, set up RODCs, buggered about with moving FSMO roles, broke DNS a few times and set all kind of evil group policies on my imaginary users (including Peter Fial and Avjaz bin Fayed). The virtual servers I set up on my home PC(s) were far more valuable from a learning perspective because it was fine to break them.
    While it's true exams are to certify what you know, personally I don't see any harm in using an exam objectives to create yourself a framework or syllabus to learn from. So buy the books, study them, but most importantly play around with EVERYTHING you learn with virtual servers. Try everything. And then make up scenarios and try to implement them. Try stuff out. If you don't manage to break things a few times you're not exploring enough!

    2) AdamV - you have a fantastic sig!
     
    Certifications: A+; Network+; Security+, CTT+; MCDST; 4 x MTA (Networking, OS, Security & Server); MCITP - Enterprise Desktop Support; MCITP - Enterprise Desktop Administrator; MCITP - Server Administrator; MCSA - Server 2008; MCT; IOSH; CCENT
    WIP: CCNA; Server 2012; LPIC; JNCIA?
  10. AdamV

    AdamV Bit Poster

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    1) Absolutely brilliant point. The objectives are supposed to cover all areas of the products, so even if you don't want to take the exam they should give you a way to identify things you can do with the software that you might not otherwise have realised.

    2) Why, thank you! A runner-up for consideration was "The early bird catches the worm, but it's the second mouse who gets the cheese"
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCSA:Messaging 2003, MCTS:Dynamics CRM 4.0 and 2011; MOS: Master Instructor 2003, 2007
    WIP: Writing CRM 2013 Customization course. Planning to take all CRM 2013 exams ASAP
  11. IBMjosepiedaly

    IBMjosepiedaly New Member

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    So for someone who has 2003 + 2008 real time server experience, but is a junior admin where would be a good place to start a first time certification path? I have the benefit of being able to "compare" to production environment though not of course alter. I have built some test 2008 servers in out test environment which I can modify anytime. I have 1 - 2 years supporting servers of all hardware types and all kinds of applications (don't actually support apps, just OS etc). I also have some hardware experience as I was a DC tech for a few years.

    Any advice is appreciate.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2012

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