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God help us.

Discussion in 'General Cisco Certifications' started by Headache, Jan 21, 2007.

  1. Headache

    Headache Gigabyte Poster

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    I'm reading the chapter on ISDN and boy, the amount acronyms and terminologies and aggravation-isms is giving me a headache. ITU this and DS0 that and Q.921 the other .....

    Crikey !

    Who the hell comes up with all of this stuff ?
     
    Certifications: CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  2. Headache

    Headache Gigabyte Poster

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    At least now I know what a Q921 is. Come exam day and they ask:

    Examiner: what is a Q921 ?

    Examinee: LAPD (Hey Presto !)

    Examiner: Correct ! Well done.

    Examiner: So what is an LAPD ?

    Examinee: Los Angeles Police Department.

    Examiner: Er, nope ! Sorry. I'm afraid you've failed your CCNA on this ocassion. Try again next year.
     
    Certifications: CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  3. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    Gives you a 'headache' doesn't it! :biggrin
     
  4. supag33k

    supag33k Kilobyte Poster

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    Buddy I feel your pain! :rolleyes:

    It is a common problem in IT and Comms - and I type this in Oz at midnight... and yes I have a bad headache otherwise I would be asleep.

    The acronyms are devised in part due to the RFC's or request for comments that august bodies like ieee [institute of electronic enginners] use to define a protocol, service or IT product.

    Usually the naming and description of operations desrcibed by an RFC finds it's way into the end product - hence acronym city on some occasions.

    With ISDN you just have to remeber that it is a managed service not a just a connection. Also if you understand basic rate and primary rate then you are well on your way.

    ISDN explained...
    http://www.broadcastisdn.net/isdn_explained.php?PHPSESSID=caaeec36229e113234815dab9377812e

    ISDN explained by Cisco - relevant to your course and then some!
    http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/cisintwk/ito_doc/isdn.htm

    HTH

    supag33k
     
    Certifications: MCSE (NT4/2000/2003/Messaging), MCDBA
    WIP: CCNA, MCTS SQL, Exchange & Security stuff
  5. Headache

    Headache Gigabyte Poster

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    @simongrahamuk

    Absolutely ! Headache is my name. And headache is my game (well, at least until I get to the end of this chapter, anyway.)

    @ Supag33k

    Thanks Buddy. Those links are a great help. Now if you have a couple of aspirins to spare, I'll be well on my way.
     
    Certifications: CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  6. NetEyeBall

    NetEyeBall Kilobyte Poster

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    On the bright side ISDN probably will be out on the next version of the CCNA.
     
    Certifications: CCNA, A+, N+, MCSE 4.0, CCA
    WIP: CCDA, CCNP, Cisco Firewall
  7. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Not too many places seem to use it anymore.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  8. G1BB0

    G1BB0 Nibble Poster

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    dont most networks use an ISDN backup though? (I know we do lol)
     
    WIP: N+ & CCNA
  9. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    We had a T1 connection and a Frame Relay backup at each site, but our applications required more bandwidth than even a T1 could handle, so we currently have four bonded T1s at each site at a minimum. We're probably going to get a business cable connection for a failover link.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  10. NetEyeBall

    NetEyeBall Kilobyte Poster

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    Most of our facilities use at least two bonded t1s as primary and a metro ethernet connection as a backup.

    We are moving to having the facilities route out primary through the metro E and use the t1s as backup.

    We used to have 2 to 3 t1s as primary and a single t1 as secondary.

    Remote sites usually have a single t1 link (doctor's offices, surgery centers and so on). Occasionally they have a t1 with a fractional t as a backup. Probably can burst over the CIR at an increased cost, but I feel this will go away.
     
    Certifications: CCNA, A+, N+, MCSE 4.0, CCA
    WIP: CCDA, CCNP, Cisco Firewall
  11. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    In the UK we don't have T1s, and the equivalent, an E1, is too expensive when delivered as a leased line.

    Consequentialy ISDN is heavily used by businesses, mostly as a backup for an ADSL connection.

    The company I work for has a very popular package of ADSL, ISDN backup and a SLA.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  12. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    <giggle>

    Actualy I found the difference between Q.921 and Q.931 easy - the first is layer 2, the second layer 3 (OSI layers).

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+

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