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Gnome vs KDE

Discussion in 'Linux / Unix Discussion' started by michael78, Jul 23, 2005.

  1. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Just wanted to get peoples opinion on which is the best GUI to use for Linux and why?
     
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  2. Phoenix
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    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    personally i use GNOME these days, but i used to be in the KDE camp, to be honest in red hat you wont notice much of a difference (atleast u never used to) because they tweak them enough to look as identical as possible

    i find gnome is just generally more polished these days than KDE, IMHO ofcourse
     
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  3. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Phoenix when installing Fedora you can install both KDE and Gnome is there a way of changing between the two?
     
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  4. Phoenix
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    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    yes at the boot screen when u see nteh blue username prompt, should be some option down the bottom i beleive
     
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  5. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    found it cheers. seeing KDE I think I'll stick with Gnome...:)
     
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  6. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    It seems to all be a matter of taste, which is why a number of the distros let you choose which Xwindow you want at install. Red Hat people seem to like Gnome and Debian people seem to like KDE. I've heard that it's easier for people to migrate from a Microsoft Windows desktop to KDE because they are laid out similarly but personally I don't see it. I have virtual machines that have both desktop environments. I like the variety.

    Also, there are quite a number of other linux desktop environments.
     
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  7. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Where did you come up with the Redhat/Gnome and Debian/KDE stats, trip? I have read quite a bit on the Debian mailing lists and I've never really come to that conclusion. Plus, I'm a Gnome guy myself. :p

    However, I don't really have any type of stat to back this up. I just have the feeling that most Debian users, Debian being the most "politically correct" distro in relationship to the GNU license, would tend to stay away from KDE simply because it is more like MS's gui. Most Debian users are not big fans of MS and from what I've seen, tend to stay away from all things mindful of MS. Read some of the long convoluted discussions about the GNU license on the Debian mailing lists and you'll see what I mean. A lot of Debian users are very passionate about it and the threads tend to be very long and have a fair amount of flame throwing.
     
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  8. Phoenix
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    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    now if they spent some time developing debian instead of flamethrowing... :)


    lol i used to use debian but got fed up of sarge being a testing build for over a year, now im firmly in the gentoo camp
     
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  9. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Ditched Redhat and downloaded SUSE 9.3 got to say this is the best looking Linux Distro I've seen. Really nicely laid out and easy to navigate. I've also done a reversal I'm using KDE in SUSE as Gnome doesn't look as good. I think this whole KDE vs Gnome thing comes down to which distro you use.
     
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  10. Phoenix
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    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    only if you use one of these fancy pants lets tie everything into our own design distros
    linux is about choice, gentoo and debian give u that choice from the ground up, and gnome wins hands down in an un biased deployment :)


    but yes kde looks good in suse, suses designed primarily round it, and redhat around gnome,
    although that wasnt always the case

    however its definatly still personal preference thing at the end of the day
     
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  11. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    That doesn't bother me at all. I actually think that a slow release schedule is a Debian strength. I can't imagine corporations wanting to upgrade OS's on a yearly basis, and having to upgrade all your servers every year in a complex environment would be a nightmare. That wouldn't be cost effective at all. Stability/longevity is a good thing.

    I see a lot of people complaining about Debian's release schedule, but I think a lot of it is just wanting change for change's sake. To me it's just a reflection of how our society has to have something new all the time. I'd rather have something released when it's done right even if it takes a long time. I'd rather have quality over quantity and change.

    I read about all the problems people have had with the Fedora releases and see how many vulnerabilities are found there and it confirms my belief in the way Debian has done things. I really hope they don't change the way they do things.

    I'm running almost pure Sarge right now, although I have a few things such as Java installed on my desktop. However, as soon as the developers get the dependencies ironed out from the switch over to the new C++ compiler and a few other things like that I'll switch over to testing again, on my desktop anyway as I find it interesting to watch how things change. A lot of what I've learned in my year of Linux experience has come from trying to figure out what broke when things changed. It makes me really have to dig deep and do a lot of research to figure things out.

    I'll leave my servers as pure Sarge because I don't want to experiment with them. I want them to just run, and Debian does that very well.
     
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  12. Phoenix
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    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    I agree to a point freddy
    Debian is a fine server build, and one I use often
    however as a geek with a desktop, its not kept current enough for me, im a fan of bleeding edge, and gentoo afords me that

    saying that, gentoos portage system is rigourously tested, it took a good few months before gnome 2.8 was release in the tree after its initial release, just because the builds are all customised for the gentoo environment and made to work, however the truely crazy can opt to install masked builds with special commands
    its that customisation that i like, and i found it easier than with debian (debian is awfully customisable itself mind you)

    I dont want it to seem like im into a distro war coz im definatly not, i love debian, and use it for a variety of tasks, i just love gentoos capabilities far more

    I know what you mean about learning by 'repairing' ive had a hell of a time with my custom gentoo kernels until i found out that VMWare changed the emulated SCSI controller from a Buslogic one to a MPD Fusion driver or something, good old them for letting me know ;)

    Perhaps growing up in the IT era has made me a bit more 'oo change for change sake' however i tend to balance the pros and cons of any change, i wont sit on something just because 'it works' if change could provide something that 'works better'

    its all about risk assessment, things could go wrong, is the benefit worth it? for a server? not always, in a complex infrastructure? not often, but for my home pc? hell yeah bring on the bleeding edge! (worse case scenario is i have to restore the old files from my rsync mirror :)

    Its great to have yet another new member with some interesting insights and thought out posts to add to the fray, great to have you aboard mate! :)
     
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  13. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Well, after seeing your bio, I surrender. ***puts hands up and backs away from the keyboard*** :biggrin

    I agree with what you said to a large degree. I might someday go to Gentoo, but I'm not experienced enough or knowledgable enough yet to venture there yet. I'm still in a pretty steep learning curve with Debian and would imagine things will stay that way for a while. The more I learn the more I realize just how ignorant I am.... :rolleyes:

    I would also defer to you on your analysis of new vs. established in the area of risk and exposure. I'm no security guru by an stretch of the imagination but I can see the value in what you say. I'm just at a level of knowledge at this point where anything I administer is more secure with something established than with something on the bleeding edge--I have more resources to learn from with something that is established to fill in the holes that exist from my lack of knowledge and experience.
     
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  14. Phoenix
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    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    Dont get too into my Bio, im still very young, and the great thing about this place is the variety of people in the variety of roles at varying stages of thier career, i can tell you i learn just as much from others here as they may or may not do from me, and thats the great thing about it, im by no means a guru, and definatly not a linux guru, i just happen to be a geek, and have been since i was 10, this stuff isnt just a job, its my hobby, its my passion, and i think im the better for it :)

    My learning curve is also still steep, and was a bit erratic
    it came about by me learning what friends were using, although I started out with redhat on my own (this is like, redhat 7 or 8, so not exactly eons ago)

    one friend over in the states works for an ISP and is a FreeBSD guru so i have some exposure to that, a guy here is a debian guy so i learnt alot from him
    alot of linux long termers like to just pass me off to the 'man' page, and whilst I aggree the man page is a wealth of information, i dont happen to believe its a source of learning for most people, its formatted for people who know what there doing, and need to know the options, its not really aimed at people asking 'how do i show my disk configuration?'

    an old colegues brother is over and he is a gentoo guy, and has been steadily helping me along over the last year with gentoo, and so im in that camp at the moment, but the learning curve is still amazingly steep for linux in general, not just my distro of choice (can you believe i only learnt about screen yesturday? lol, its amazing what gets overlooked :D
     
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  15. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    LOL. The "I surrender" bit was joke.

    However, you still have far more computer experience than I do. For all intents and purposes I hadn't touched a computer until 5 years ago, and the first two years were spent playing games, so I started at this late in life. And, I have no computer geek friends other than the one's I have met online. Everyone I know of my age IRL is completely computer illiterate.... :rolleyes: I have to teach them how to copy and paste, when and if I can drag them kicking and screaming to a computer screen.

    You won't realize just how much of an advantage youth is until you start learning something as foreign to you then as computers are to a lot of us my age when you're in your 50's. It requires a total re-education in terms of logic and how to approach things. Most guys give up and claim to hate it rather than start learning something so foreign this late in life. It just happened to fascinate me because I love learning....
     
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