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Getting into it as a new career

Discussion in 'Training & Development' started by Virgowoman2, Dec 18, 2009.

  1. Virgowoman2

    Virgowoman2 Bit Poster

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    I am looking into this IT career route and I have been looking for awhile. Time to get some proper direction.

    I have seen a lot of people here are recommending the self-study route. This sounds daunting for me with no IT work experience and somebody who is new to this. I am not self-disciplined enough doing this on my own. I would like to get into an IT college with classes but I know they are rare these days. It's all about self-paced home learning. How would someone get their foot through the door? Employers won't take someone with no experience. What kind of techy positions would be available for such a person? Even Service Desk Analysts often require an MCP, MCDST, MCSA etc. I would be prepared to start with entry an level position. With the recession everyone is still keen to get whatever income they can and that doesn't include voluntary work.

    I am also a very creative person who's never been good at Math. So I don't know if technical studies or web design course would be better? I would like to do something I will enjoy and be able to start a career with.

    Hope you can help.

    Virgowoman
     
    Certifications: none
  2. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    what talents and experience do you have to bring to the table? What i mean is, why do you think IT is for you? it is a very competitve industry and many people have been home hobbyists for years before attempting to embark on a career.
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  3. Virgowoman2

    Virgowoman2 Bit Poster

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    As I said earlier Blue Rinse, I would be starting out from scratch!

    Virgowoman
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 18, 2009
    Certifications: none
  4. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    I would also like to know what BR asked :) Have you done this as a hobby? Or is it because someone got you thinking about IT as a career option? Etc... Also working in IT is not only just about being technical, soft skills do play a good part of it.

    While self study is recommended, it is not the only route that is recommend. There are colleges/Uni's/training companies offering training courses/qualifications, etc. that you can do. Just be very wary of the training providers that promise you the "moon", always read the fine print and if you have any question - ASK!

    There are alot of training providers that will "guarantee" you a £26k pa job after you finish their course, and they charge £4-10k for it. Don't fall for that.

    Rare? In what area? In Northants, you practically can't find a college/IT training provider that doesn't offer these courses. If you're just starting out, I wouldn't advise doing the MCSA. Start off with the A+ & Network+ for the basic's, then build upon that. That's provided you want to go down the technical support route.

    First things first... Decide what area/branch of IT you want to go into. Do you want to go down the technical support route, web design/development, programming or the Data (MIS) side?

    There's no point studying for everything if you're not going to use it, after all it's your money.

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  5. Virgowoman2

    Virgowoman2 Bit Poster

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    Thanks Ken. I have only been swayed towards the technical side because I have heard there are more job opportunites thus I have been told by some people, who are IT, web design wouldn't be as good to get into as say 1st line, desktop support.

    I am aware from this site the best certs to start from would be A+, N+ and MCDST. From buying these books and having a new approach to self discipline, I just wanted to know if someone with no IT experience either hands on or employment would benefit from self study?

    Virgowoman
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2009
    Certifications: none
  6. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    No worries :)

    To be honest there are swings and roundabouts, there are periods where there are more IT support jobs about, then there is a lull and web design jobs spring up or programming jobs spring up. Don't just take what people tell you on face value, do your research.

    There is nothing worse than being convinced by others to go or do one thing, only to find out that when the time comes it's not what you thought.

    The A+, Network+ and the MCDST are great certs to have on entry level/tier1 (and above), but imo, really only benefically if you do decide to enter the techical support side of IT. I know very successful programmers, web developers and MIS personel that are great at their job, but don't know how to build a PC or configure a desktop PC via AD on a domain.

    But back to your question, yes, any form of knowledge whether it is from self-study or class based instruction is benefical.

    One thing I would also like to point out, that while some people get their first job in IT almost straight away, it can take others years. It took me 5 years to get into IT.

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip

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