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Getting back into IT

Discussion in 'New Members Introduction' started by vannnnnn, Apr 28, 2010.

  1. vannnnnn

    vannnnnn New Member

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    Hi Everyone! Just a little intro. I worked in IT about 9 years ago for a non-profit. Did really well there and was on my way to certification land, but a divorce derailed my plans. Ended up moving to Japan and have been teaching English for the past 6 years. Got remarried and now looking to move back to the States and start my IT career over.

    I'm mechanically inclined and have been building/overclocking PCs as a hobby since 1998. So, all my IT skills are self-taught aside from an A+ cert in 2001 (probably not valid anymore). I'd like to get back into Desktop support doing installs, repairs, upgrades, software training, backups, and the like. All of this probably on Microsoft run hardware.

    My question and reason for joining this forum is mainly to find out what my next steps might be. I was thinking about updating my A+ cert, but also mulling around the idea of an MCDST. Does anyone have any suggestions? I love fixing computers and helping people with their computer problems, but not sure what I should do next.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2010
  2. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

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    The A+ certification doesnt expire, but the technologies in that exam will mostly be obsolete, so if you want to update the knowledge it may be worth going through an up to date course/book and then doing the exam at your descretion.

    The MCDST is a good place to start with Microsoft, XP is still widely used so is worth doing, but there are equivalents for Vista (Enterprise Support Technician) and Windows 7 (Enterprise Desktop Support Technician) if you are lucky enough to secure work then obviously concentrate on the technology you will be supporting, but I would start with the MCDST then the EDST to give you a wider range of credentials.
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal
  3. jk2447

    jk2447 Petabyte Poster Moderator

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    I'd have a look at the Network+ while you are at it. Its a great into to networking but aside from that MCDST or one of the client exams would be good to study for (70-270, 70-620, 70-680)
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), HND IT, HND Computing, ITIL-F, MBCS CITP, MCP (270,290,291,293,294,298,299,410,411,412) MCTS (401,620,624,652) MCSA:Security, MCSE: Security, Security+, CPTS, VCP4, CCA (XenApp6.5), MCSA 2012, VCP5, VCP6-NV
  4. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Even though your A+ won't expire, the new A+ is a great place to start. Alternatively, you could tackle Network+ and/or the MCDST.

    Welcome to the forums! :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2010
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  5. gosh1976

    gosh1976 Kilobyte Poster

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    I'm in a similar position trying to get back into IT and my A+ is from around the same time. I opted not to update my A+ but I have spent a good bit of time updating the knowledge for A+. This wasn't too difficult as I've stayed pretty up to date with technology. I don't really see any reason to resit the A+ or take the bridge exam as my A+ from back then is even on my Microsoft transcript now. I did watch a number of the professor Messer videos http://www.professormesser.com/free...-free-comptia-a-certification-training-course they are great. I also bought one of the A+ books to look through. I've added the network+ and MCDST as well.
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCDST, CCENT, MCTS: Win 7 Configuring, CCNA
  6. BosonJosh

    BosonJosh Gigabyte Poster

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    Welcome to the forums!
     
  7. vannnnnn

    vannnnnn New Member

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    Why does it seem like everyone's saying it's so difficult to find work in IT these days? On Monster.com it looks like there's a lot of work. Is it because it's all very specialized? Am I going to be hard pressed to find anything as a help desk tech?

    Thanks everyone for your input. I think I'm going to check out Messer's videos some more as a little refresher and go for MCDST and maybe Network+.
     
  8. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    No, it's not because the jobs don't exist... it's because everyone and his brother are going for those jobs. There are a lot of people looking to get into IT these days, so competition is fierce.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  9. ericrollo

    ericrollo Megabyte Poster

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    A lot of the jobs are not actually real jobs, an employment agency can advertise for jobs which do not exist.

    A lot of the "Competition" are useless, i know one person who is jobless after being fired for gross misconduct at a shop for stealing money and is looking for an IT job.
     
    Certifications: MOS Master, A+, MCP 271
    WIP: HND, Programming, Another Job
  10. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    They CAN advertise jobs that don't exist, but there's no reason for them to do so. It costs them money to advertise jobs that don't exist. And there are plenty of real jobs for them to advertise.

    Plus, you might *think* they're not jobs, but I will bet you that they are real. Whether or not they put you (or ANYONE) forward for that job is a different story... the job might be filled internally, but the company might have a legal requirement to post the job publicly for a certain period of time. Thus, the job is quite real... though your chances of getting that job might not be.

    Sure, they might be useless... and the best way to get ahead of your competition is by looking better than they do. Ultimately, the employer has to sift through hundreds (if not thousands) of CVs to find the good ones.

    As you might guess, if it is discovered by a potential employer that your acquaintance has stolen money, they've got about a snowball's chance in hell of getting that job. Bad references are like shackles.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2010
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!

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