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FSB question

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by greenbrucelee, Nov 24, 2008.

  1. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Is there a way to tell wether the frequency of the FSB is too high without any system issues or pops?

    I have had my cpu set on the automatic cpu level up function which has brought it's speed from 3GHz to 3.5GHz, I decided to see what would happen if I increased the FSB from 390 - 400 (3.6GHz) and haven't had any issues.

    I was just wondering if there was a way to tell how far I could go without going to far.
     
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  2. grim

    grim Gigabyte Poster

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    use mem test and 3dmark to abuse the system, if it survives without blue screening/rebooting etc keep upping the fsb :)

    GRim
     
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  3. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    I ran 3dmark without any probs, I will go and run memtest and see what happens
     
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  4. grim

    grim Gigabyte Poster

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    Also keep an eye on your CPU core temps under load. I would normally reccommend replacing the cooler and thermal compound if you plan on pushing it too far.

    Then once it becomes unstable you then need to start tweaking the memory timings and vcore volts etc etc.....prob best to start googling guides when you get this far

    GRim
     
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  5. NightWalker

    NightWalker Gigabyte Poster

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  6. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    How far is too far?

    Yep have that bookmarked from when you gave me the link a while back.
     
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  7. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    I have real temp with TJ MAX set to 95 and both core temps are reading 37 degrees.
     
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  8. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Added another 10 to FSB now 410 I have the cpu at 3.70GHz, ran 3dMark06 got 16333 no errors. Real temp reports a 1 degree temperature increase at idle so I don't think I'll go any higher.
     
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  9. twizzle

    twizzle Gigabyte Poster

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    You can try downloading this app and running it for 1hr to see if the system is stable. I here soem professional OC'ers use it, even if it does seem basic, it will show you the % of OC'ing as well.

    http://www.ocbase.com/perestroika_en/
     
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  10. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    I ran that and it stopped after a minute saying the cpu was too hot, but nothing else is reporting a high temp and I have been playing far cry 2 for 20 minutes without any issue.

    There are problems with software reading wolfdale cpu temps due to stuck sensors, apparently real temp is the only one that works.

    I have been running at 3.52 for months and OCCT said my cpu was too hot.
     
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  11. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    As long as games, apps, etc run fine for long periods of time, you shouldn't worry much. Besides I know your cpu could go up 4ghz with proper cooling :twisted:
     
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  12. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Well I have a tuniq tower for the cpu cooler, 3 120mm intake fans, 2 120mm exhaust fans and 1 200mm top mounted exhaust fan for cooling. I was also thinking of getting the optional 120mm intake fan which will help cool the gpu & part of the cpu too.
     
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  13. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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    Have a play around with Prime95. It's what all the cool kids use to see if their systems are running well after an OC.

    If you can run it for a few hours without issues, then your OC is pretty much guaranteed to be stable. If you do get errors, then you may want to scale back the OC, or change the memory timings to be less agresssive, or up the Vcore etc...
     
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  14. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    I havent changed anything with the memory yet, the FSB is set at 410 which is 3.70GHz and has put the memory to 820 from 937 when I was 3.5, does that sound ok?
     
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  15. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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    I don't know if it's ok mate as I don't have that chip or that mobo. What you need to do is go and find a forum where people are discussing overclocking that specific chip. You are bound to find that somewhere.

    Sometimes an OC can cause your memory to become unstable, in which case bumping up the memory voltage or using less agressive timings can help. On the flipside, sometimes you can gain performance by tweaking your memory settings to be more agressive.

    It's kind of like an art really rather than a science. You get to know your own system and setting that it likes and doesn't. General advice is just that ... general.
     
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  16. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    cool, cheers :) I'll have a look around for any info
     
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  17. grim

    grim Gigabyte Poster

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    check the stepping on your cpu, you'll be able to find more out with that

    GRim
     
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  18. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    how do I do that? never done this manually before :oops:
     
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  19. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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  20. grim

    grim Gigabyte Poster

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    or you could look at your CPU

    [​IMG]

    It'll tell you things like cpu speed/cache/bus speed/date/manufactured location

    All these factors determine its overclockability and you should be able to search google and find how far other people have pushed the chip.

    Proper die hard overclockers choose their chips purely on the stepping

    GRim
     
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