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Finding time

Discussion in 'Training & Development' started by zxspectrum, Jul 20, 2015.

  1. zxspectrum

    zxspectrum Gigabyte Poster Premium Member

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    General question really but I am wondering what strategies or techniques you all use in learning new technologies.

    I am finding it rather hard to focus on one thing and stick with it. An example could be the issues we had a few months back with office 365, today I had a relatively simple issue to deal with but the familiarity wasn't there. Also we had issues with Active Directory profiles and we were dealing with that issue, but now its time to do updates and imaging etc.

    I think what I am trying to say is that I may be doing too many things at once, which is like a default setting as its part of my job I suppose, or am I being over eager which surely cant be bad thing. It doesn't help while I am at the helpdesk as I will be constantly bombarded even for things that aren't even IT. Then if I have the energy Ill carry on looking at issues at home, but then sometimes if we have had a busy day, ill be too tired and need to just wind down.

    So how do you all cope.

    Eddie
     
    Certifications: BSc computing and information systems
    WIP: 70-680
  2. Apexes

    Apexes Gigabyte Poster

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    I very much focus on purely systems management and desktop engineering at the moment. I no longer get helpdesk calls, but the odd 4th line escalation through service now, so find it easy to focus on my speciality.

    Back when i was on helpdesk - i had the same as you, it's difficult to engage in focusing on one activity when you have to support many, over time (2 years or so) - you'll slowly build knowledge over all these systems. Which in my book, is an advantage if you ask me - you're gaining a broader exposure to multiple systems which can only help you in your future career, and eventually when you move jobs.

    Going into a speciality, i guess requires that initial break into a system that you're confident with, you'll figure out what that is you want to do eventually.

    Example with me - i was doing all sorts of work, AD, SCCM, Hardware, GPO's etc. eventually my knowledge on SCCM peaked to a point whereby it was enough for me to branch out into doing that as a focus point - where i learned more each day using the system.

    I guess figure out what you want to specialize in, try and focus on that if you get those sort of related calls come in. I used to revise on my lunch break, take an hour out somewhere quiet and read through SCCM whilst gnawing on some bread :D
     
    Certifications: 70-243 MCTS: ConfigMgr 2012 | MCSE: Private Cloud
  3. jk2447

    jk2447 Petabyte Poster Moderator

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    It's cool to be a generalist but I think its also important to excel in one area, so I'd pick one thing you like, or need to know a lot about and try to master that, keeping other areas in your peripheral. You can't know it all but at least if you're the go to guy on something, say O365, you can impress in that area while maintaining a respectable level of knowledge in other areas.
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), HND IT, HND Computing, ITIL-F, MBCS CITP, MCP (270,290,291,293,294,298,299,410,411,412) MCTS (401,620,624,652) MCSA:Security, MCSE: Security, Security+, CPTS, VCP4, CCA (XenApp6.5), MCSA 2012, VCP5, VCP6-NV
  4. zxspectrum

    zxspectrum Gigabyte Poster Premium Member

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    Cheers for the feedback

    I will try and find something to focus on, my problem is I want to know everything ha ha. I think besides going for the A+ and N+, it would be beneficial to get into Active directory. It has been quite difficult recently as I have been using public transport to get to work, which entails an extra 4 hours to my day, now I have a car I have more free time to spare rather than being tired all the time. I could try and read on the bus but I found that hard to concentrate etc.

    Cheers

    Eddie
     
    Certifications: BSc computing and information systems
    WIP: 70-680
  5. Apexes

    Apexes Gigabyte Poster

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    4 hours on public transport!?
     
    Certifications: 70-243 MCTS: ConfigMgr 2012 | MCSE: Private Cloud
  6. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    Why not? I used to spend between 5 and 6 a day on trains, each and every day.
     
    Certifications: CNA | CNE | CCNA | MCP | MCP+I | MCSE NT4 | MCSA 2003 | Security+ | MCSA:S 2003 | MCSE:S 2003 | MCTS:SCCM 2007 | MCTS:Win 7 | MCITP:EDA7 | MCITP:SA | MCITP:EA | MCTS:Hyper-V | VCP 4 | ITIL v3 Foundation | VCP 5 DCV | VCP 5 Cloud | VCP6 NV | VCP6 DCV | VCAP 5.5 DCA
    WIP: VCP6-CMA, VCAP-DCD and Linux + (and possibly VCIX-NV).
  7. Monkeychops

    Monkeychops Kilobyte Poster

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    That's one thing I've loved with my current role, I'm highly focused on pretty much a single area and product set the majority of the time.

    It's been lovely to be able to really get stuck in.

    Now I'm well known (in the real world ;) ) for always living in the arse end of nowhere and anything that would resemble a daily commute for me would be pretty rubbish (work from home now mostly), but I certainly wouldn't want to be spending 3 hours each way commuting a day.
    Granted everyone's circumstances are different as are the rewards so there's no right or wrong answer, people do whatever works and they are happy with!
    I know you've indeed did it for a fair while, and arguably it's better than the alternative of staying away during the week (done that, not great).
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2015
  8. Apexes

    Apexes Gigabyte Poster

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    Christ on a bike - fair play

    i always complained of my 45 minute either way commute.

    Lucky now that i can drive into work within 20-30 minutes most days
     
    Certifications: 70-243 MCTS: ConfigMgr 2012 | MCSE: Private Cloud
  9. rocdamike

    rocdamike Byte Poster Gold Member

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    My commute is 2 hours each way. Can get a bit annoying, but I think I'm used to it now :)
     
    Certifications: CCNA R&S, CCENT, F5 101 Application Delivery Fundamentals, ITIL Foundation (2011), CompTIA (A+, Network+), MTA (Windows OS, Networking, HTML5)
    WIP: CCNA Security
  10. FuzzyBallz

    FuzzyBallz Bit Poster

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    2 hours each way :eek:

    I work on my doorstep and moan about morning traffic, hats off to you. :tiphat:

    Would be a great excuse to get out on the bike more though
     
    WIP: Comptia A+
  11. Jaron78

    Jaron78 Megabyte Poster

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    Bugger me that's a lot of commuting.
    When I first started working, (About 16/17) I used to commute a lot. Essex to Windsor for example.
    Now, I go from Liverpool Street to Waltham Cross (45 Mins) and I find it a bit frustrating :)
     
  12. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

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    I've been reading this topic and its got me seriously thinking, especially the comment Jim made, I have been trying to dabble in everything really and not focusing on one thing, and I think this could be a big downfall. I think I am going to focus on one specific area of IT instead of trying to be a generalist.
     
    Certifications: MTA Windows Fundamentals, ITIL Foundation, Apple Mac Integration 10.12
    WIP: MTA Networking Fundamentals
  13. Jaron78

    Jaron78 Megabyte Poster

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    What are you thinking of mate?
     

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