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Exposure or saturation of certain certifications

Discussion in 'Training & Development' started by Arroryn, Oct 13, 2008.

  1. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

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    I was just perusing the M$ site, discovering new 'areas' now I have a different login :tune I found this link to be interesting reading, especially with how we say MCSEs have saturated the market in recent years.

    Unfortunately I couldn't find the same kind of figures for CompTIA certs, but given the MCDSTs relative "entry level" status, I was suprised to see the following numbers (figures worldwide, September '08 )

    Even with the apparent 'decline' in take-up of the MCSE, I'm still quite stunned there are so few MCDST certified individuals worldwide, given the 'pyramid' nature of IT work and that most people have to start at the bottom. Especially since you can take into consideration that 70-620 (Vista Configuration) already has 40K+ certified individuals.

    Also, what are people's opinions on the evident decline on MCSE takeups? Are people still in the same job as when they were NT4/2K certified, and can't see the point in recertifying? Has the track simply not been available long enough?
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  2. UKDarkstar
    Honorary Member

    UKDarkstar Terabyte Poster

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    I think there are a variety of factors.

    It would be useful to see the figures broken down by country as well.

    In terms of the certs and the UK; we have the proliferation of paper certified people (or part certified) and I have seen a number of jobs where the recruiters are specifying MCSE for quite low-level entry jobs which smacks of them (or the employer) not really understanding what the certs are all about.

    You also have the upgrade factor to cosnider and whilst 2003 has been around a while companies are notoriously slow to upgrade - the old adage about not using any MS o/s on it's first release is still very much true. Whilst new features are nice comapnies (especially in the current economic climate) are wary about incurring additional IT costs when they have systems that do the job and are working fine. QED, those with older certs working on older systems are quite adequate.

    I'm not sure whether there's any impact on training budgets which may have caused a downturn in the figures and, additionally, we don't have figures for those who are part qualified with an estimate as to how long before they achieve full MCSE.

    Just my thoughts and ramblings :)
     
    Certifications: BA (Hons), MBCS, CITP, MInstLM, ITIL v3 Fdn, PTLLS, CELTA
    WIP: CMALT (about to submit), DTLLS (on hold until 2012)
  3. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

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    Fair enough points on the upgrade process - so could it be the factor of fewer core exams for the MCSA meaning the takeup for MCSA 2K3 has increased?

    It would be interesting to know what electives the 213,087 chose, when only 48K or so of them could use the MCDST. I wonder how many of them used the A+ and N+?
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  4. UKDarkstar
    Honorary Member

    UKDarkstar Terabyte Poster

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    Thinking back to interviewing support staff, a lot seemed to have started MCSE 200 and given up or abandoned for various reasons. I think the more "modern" feel of 2003 encouraged more people to get onto it and the fact that you can use the exams to get other certs helps and perhaps prolongs the process of full MCSE certification.

    Certainly staff I have interviewed never seemed to bother with A+ or N+ or if they did they never put it on their CV's.
     
    Certifications: BA (Hons), MBCS, CITP, MInstLM, ITIL v3 Fdn, PTLLS, CELTA
    WIP: CMALT (about to submit), DTLLS (on hold until 2012)
  5. Teebor

    Teebor Nibble Poster

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    I've found a lot of people don't know there is an MCDST and in fact think that an MCSE is an entry level qualification.

    Which is really wrong when you think about it.

    I was always told that to get anywhere you needed an MCSE when I was at school, I of course know now that it is a very heavily bogged down qualification with people who have the qualification but actually don't know anything. For example when I was working as an unqualified first line support guy I used to tell the MCSE qualified server guy what to do. The other guy who worked in the same area as him who was my friend used to complain about him all the time as he didn't actually know anything but had a paper qualification whilst he had the qualification and the experience.

    I can only guess but I imagine a lot of people see it as an easy qualification to a well paid job.

    As for the spread I started out on the 2000 qualification but actually have the majority of experience in 2003 but when I started we still had 2000 servers. I didn't bother to upgrade to 2003 when the exams retired for the above reasons. Also I want to work more with networks so moved to cisco to try and get away from the help desk positions
     
    Certifications: A+, Network +, MCSA, CCNA, Coupla MCP's
    WIP: CCNP BCMSN, CVOICE, ITIL
  6. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    In the grand scheme of things, the MCDST really hasn't been around that long... about 4 years, if my memory hasn't failed me completely. Most people who already have the MCSA or MCSE don't really have a need to "go back" and get the MCDST (though I did, for reasons that should be obvious due to my job responsibilities).

    Additionally, employers are just now figuring out that the MCDST exists. There are still quite a few clueless employers out there who think they need an MCSE to do desktop support work. Sad, really...
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!

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