1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Exchange 2007 - restore deleted items

Discussion in 'Software' started by Mikeyboy, Jul 19, 2012.

  1. Mikeyboy

    Mikeyboy Kilobyte Poster

    278
    2
    32
    Hopefully an easy answer

    How do I restore deleted items, at server level, to someones mailbox?

    In exchange 2003 I would use PFDAVAdmin, look for the mailbox, folder, and then display deleted items and restore.

    This doesn't work with exchange 2007, cannot access the mailboxes this way. I read about the follow up, ExFolders, but this is for 2010,, supposedly able to connect to 2007 exchange store if you run from a 2010 server - but doesn't really help if you are in a single exchange 2007 environment.

    So, what have people done when needing to restore deleted items from mailboxes in 2007? And I don't mean, enable dumpster to allow restoring items by using "restore deleted items" - this is mostly what gets returned by Google searches. I need to know how to restore single items once they have been deleted from the restore deleted items bit (make sense?? :biggrin)

    Assume there are no backups, and I just want to make use of the deleted item retention period thing...
     
    Certifications: VCP,MCSA, MCP, MCDST, MCITP, MCTS, A+, N+
  2. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

    10,191
    296
    319

    Whaaaaaaaat? :)
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  3. Mikeyboy

    Mikeyboy Kilobyte Poster

    278
    2
    32
    Lol... thought it would be at least 5 minutes before someone picked up on that!

    This is my home lab environment - but I still want to know how to do it for work. The process seems totally different for exchange 2010, something about enabling single item retention, then searching with search discovery mailbox or something... but what is the 2007 process??

    In 2003 I would not have to bother using a backup to restore, for example, a single email - do I have to do this in 2007?
     
    Certifications: VCP,MCSA, MCP, MCDST, MCITP, MCTS, A+, N+
  4. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

    10,191
    296
    319
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  5. Mikeyboy

    Mikeyboy Kilobyte Poster

    278
    2
    32
    Hmm.. Dunno, unless I'm missing something there, when it gets to the part about restoring an item, it only mentions outlook? There must be another way? :)
     
    Certifications: VCP,MCSA, MCP, MCDST, MCITP, MCTS, A+, N+
  6. Shinigami

    Shinigami Megabyte Poster

    896
    40
    84
    The dumpster can contain a given number of deleted items, and you can retrieve these typically with the Outlook client. This gives the end-user, who thinks that they just performed a hard-delete on an email, the chance to go back and retrieve the item from the dumpster if the mail hasn't yet been fully purged from the server.

    Think of it as a second, hidden, trash can for those people that accidentally do a hard delete and need to recover the item, say a month later.

    The downside is that you'll be increasing, in some instances, the size of your database stores by a fair bit. For example:

    You have 100 users. On average they send and receive 10 emails a day with an average size of 1 MB per email. Thus each user grows their mailbox by 10 MB a day, or 1 GB over all users.
    If you limit their mailbox sizes to 100 MB, they will effectively be able to store 100 days worth of emails before they're full, and then they need to start hard-deleting them.
    If you configure the dumpster to retain mail for, say 100 days, then effectively you've just doubled the amount of disk space required to hold emails, because not only can the users store 100 M worth of mail in their inbox, but also 100 MB in the dumpster.

    What typically happens is that an Exchange admin considers using the dumpster as a great fail-safe for picnic errors (problem in chair, not in computer), until they realise that their original storage calculations which left 10 or 20% free space on all database disks, has run out of space due to the fact that their dumpster 'still' retains a month or two worth of email...

    Let me tell you, it's always fun explaining to customers why their database takes up 2 GB of disk space per user, when the company only allows 500 MB mailboxes (been there and this is a real example...). Databases of course have other info in there as well, such as whitespace, indexes, tables and so on... never make the mistake of just thinking that a database will be as big as the amount of inbox space you want to give your users, times the number of users. It'll always be a minimum of 1.4 x your calculated size.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, MCDST, MOS, CIW, Comptia
    WIP: Win7/Lync2010/MCM
  7. Concepts1231

    Concepts1231 New Member

    1
    0
    1
    Hi,
    As per your discussion on above i just suggest you to use inbuilt recovery tool of ms exchange and if it's not work for you you should be try any 3rd party data recovery software .

    Thanks.
     

Share This Page

Loading...