1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

ESX

Discussion in 'Virtual Computing' started by greenbrucelee, Aug 21, 2009.

  1. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    I have been told to learn it for networking although nobody has told me why :blink

    All I know about it is that it has it's own kernel and that it uses the cpu and memory directly to perform instructions but that's about it.

    What resources can anyone point me to?

    And would it be beneficial in getting it and do I need a special rig for it?
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  2. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

    5,726
    175
    221
    um
    are we talking about VMWare ESX Server here?

    if so let me know and I will move it to the appropriate forum/provide an answer
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, VCP
    WIP: > 0
  3. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    yes were sorry about that.

    I just got the email and all it says is I must learn it for networking.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  4. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

    5,726
    175
    221
    Seems like an odd requirement
    ESX networking is not overly complicated, the network port on the server acts essentially as a switch interlink port, its invisible virtual switch behind it, and a single cable connecting it to another switch outside it

    in the virtual switch you can create port groups tagged by vlan, assign multiple ports to the same server, or different servers to different port groups

    I'm not sure how understanding much of that will make your 'networking' knowledge improve though
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, VCP
    WIP: > 0
  5. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    I get that, sort of.

    Are there any books on it or is it worth getting it set up and have a mess about with it to learn?
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  6. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

    3,748
    330
    187
    Tru dat. ESX 'networking' is just like any other networking. WHo has told you to learn it for 'networking'? I'm guessing they don't have a Danny what they're on about!

    ESX is a virtualisation platform - a 'bare-metal' hypervisor which, when combined with VirtualCenter and all the other goodies in VMWare's 'Virtual Infrastructure' suite, allows you to virtualise and manage your infrastructure. The 'networking' element of it is tiny - and the only things I could see that someone would want to know about how ESX networking interacts with any physical networking is things like how to trunk VLANs to ESX hosts.

    Anyhoo, the best book I've ever seen on ESX is "Mastering VMWare Infrastructure 3" by Chris McCain. Dumps all over the competing titles as, although the Haletky and VMGuru books arguably have more content and more technical detail they are both extremely poorly edited, and appear to have been proof-read by monkeys.
     
    Certifications: A few
    WIP: None - f*** 'em
  7. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

    5,726
    175
    221

    Always worth getting it set up
    this is the future of corporate IT, get on the bandwagon as early as poss, even if its 'private' experience
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, VCP
    WIP: > 0
  8. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    Aparently I am to test server 2008 with XP and then do it with Windows 7. The IT dept is looking at miving from server 2000 and 2003 to 2003 and 2008 with a possibilty of going to Windows 7.

    I'll have a look at that book, thanks.


    Will get it set up this week :)
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?

Share This Page

Loading...