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Domains in Windows Server 2003 ?

Discussion in 'Software' started by Samuel1, Jul 29, 2011.

  1. Samuel1

    Samuel1 Bit Poster

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    Howdy all,

    I'm confused about how this all works. I set up a test Windows Server 2003 system, and a Vista machine. I created a new domain, called "NEW.DOMAIN" with a NetBIOS name of "NETBIOS_NAME" ... I still don't understand why there has to be two names... but anyway:

    - I set the password for the user "Samuel" in Active Directory, yet, when I logged into it via the Vista machine, the password was blank. Unsure why... I turned off the server, and to my surprise was still able to log into the domain w/ a blank password. Is that normal? Shouldn't it say something like "domain not available/responding"??

    - I attempted to RDP into the Vista machine from the Administrator user in the Win2k3 Server, yet no password would work. So, looking through the RDP users to add, I could not see a user called "test" that I had created for just this purpose because the Vista machine was looking "From this location: VISTABETA2" (VISTABETA2 is the computer's hostname). I was unable to change the "From this location:" to anything else other than the localmachine. Why would it not be showing me all users on the domain?

    I don't know what I am missing here. I've attached photos. Thank you all very much for reading!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Ok, you can't find the user (test) that you created in Active Directory as you are only looking on the laptop. See picture one, click on location and change that to your domain - right now it's only pointing to the laptop. You can't RDP onto the laptop with the domain admin as currently domain admin does not have rights to RDP onto the laptop, see picture one again "Administrator" is the local admin, not the domain admin.

    You say that you can not click/change the location, without more information, it looks like the user that you're logged in as (samuel) is not an admin account.

    ok, not sure about the black password problem, the first thing that springs to mind is that you first created the account with no password - you logged on to the machine, you changed the password but the machine lost connection to the domain (possibily) so the changes have not replicated to the laptop - this is only a guess based on the limited info here.

    As for being able to log on to the laptop when the server is turned off, means that you're just continuing to log on the laptop with cached credentials.

    -Ken
     
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  3. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    If you are working with one Windows domain you can make them both the same (domain name and netbios name) to make your life easier.

    There are limitations on the size of the netbios name 15 characters whereas the domain name size cannot exceed 64 characters for a FQDN of for an Active directory object.

    (e.g sparkylaptop.uk.scotland.sparky.local)

    Also when you logon to the domain at the Ctrl+Alt+Delete screen you will see the Netbios domain however when you look at the computer name it will be the FQDN of the machine.

    Links:

    NetBIOS Suffixes (16th Character of the NetBIOS Name)

    Active Directory Maximum Limits Scalability Capacity
     
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  4. Samuel1

    Samuel1 Bit Poster

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    Thank you both for your insights.

    wagnerk, I must have been doing something wrong, the Vista machine did not provide me any other Locations when I selected the "Locations..." button. So, I have since deleted everything and started over.

    I don't think I understand some general principles well enough just yet, can you guys help me out?

    I am trying to wrap my head around DNS, and understand why I would ever need a DNS server. I finally figured out that you can configure DNS on the server, and then set the clients to use the IP of the server as their DNS servers and then all the traffic will route through the server. If I am not mistaken -- client machines will query the DNS server, then the DNS server will go out to the ISP's DNS servers and retrieve the correct information and then send it back to the client, through my server. So, why would I ever need to have a local DNS server when I could just have all my clients set up through the ISP's DNS servers directly? This seems like an added layer of complexity for no benefit that I can wrap my brain around?

    Thanks again for all your help!
     
  5. jiggy

    jiggy Nibble Poster

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    Your ISPs DNS servers only know about computers on the internet / those with a public IP address. Say your own network was a corporate one with 1000 machines, workstations and servers. Your ISP has no way of knowing about these machines and nor should it. Rather you run your own DNS server so that your computers know how to find each other within their own network. That way my outlook client can find the exchange server to send email, my web browser can find the intranet server and my windows explorer can find my home network drive.

    Make sense?
     
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  6. Samuel1

    Samuel1 Bit Poster

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    Thanks jiggy, that indeed makes plenty of sense. It was just confusing to me since all the examples online only showed a client machine accessing Internet resources via the locally hosted DNS server... which is redundant.

    Anyhow, it seems that the Windows Server 2k3 DNS is designed to help manage a FQDN, which would be a domain that you've purchased from a registrar, right? You can manage a made up "domain.private" or whatever, but, then, why does it insist that you call it "something.dot.something" in that manner? I don't have a purchased-from-a-registrar-domain-name that I want managed by Windows Server 2k3 DNS. So, what to do? How do I make just a regular old "local" DNS zone for testing purposes. Should I call it "test.local"?
     
  7. soundian

    soundian Gigabyte Poster

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    If you didn't have a server for your local names you'd have to use IP address all the time. You could use a WINS server but the flat namespace and limited charachter length in netbios make it impractical for organisations of any size.
     
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  8. jiggy

    jiggy Nibble Poster

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    you can call your domain whatever you want internally. You could call it google.com, test.local, mydomain.co.uk, whatever, it will all work fine internally. Externally will be a different story as someone else owns google.com.

    To practice I suggest you call it something like mydomain.local just to keep things simple. Once you have setup the domain you need to add your clients to the domain (i.e. your vista machine).

    You are asking some good questions and thinking things through well, keep it up.
     
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  9. Samuel1

    Samuel1 Bit Poster

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    Thank you, thank you! I'll continue my testing -- very much appreciate all your help!
     

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