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Does NAT turn in to PAT (overlaod)

Discussion in 'Network+' started by AndreL, Oct 10, 2009.

  1. AndreL

    AndreL Banned

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    After translating what NAT tans. if you add more does it turn in to PAT and start doing it by port no.http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk648/tk361/technologies_q_and_a_item09186a00800e523b.shtml#qa12
     
  2. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    This may help you, i have to say the distinction is somewhat blurred..

    http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum-replies-archive.cfm/408831.html
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  3. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    Basically, PAT is NAT, only PAT uses different port numbers rather than different addresses.
     
    Certifications: CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  4. lonestar6416

    lonestar6416 New Member

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    NAT can use PAT to function Let me explain:

    Let's say that there's a group of 10 kids in a school classroom along with a teacher. The kids technically are on the same level with the teacher being the logical head/leader of the class.

    The kids (network hosts) need to submit christmas cards (network packets) via the teacher (the router) to kids in another classroom (another network) across campus (the internet).


    USING NAT:
    The teacher takes all the cards and only places them into a large envelope with just the homeroom name (eg. Grade 2) so that the other classroom doesn't know that there's more than just one student sending. It would look like the teacher alone is doing all the talking.

    The router would group all the addresses and "cover" them with just one external, routeable IP so that the other router is just receiving from one IP.



    USING PAT:
    Inside the same large envelope are the kid's cards. But instead of names, the kids are represented by the homeroom name + a special number (eg. Grade 2 #10). That way, the kids cards can be uniquely identified by their teacher as coming from a specific kid.

    Each host is represented by the routeable IP + port number (eg. 12.0.0.1 :10) so that the router can internally differentiate between hosts.





    So in summary, NAT can use PAT but PAT is strictly internal whereas NAT 'masks' (possible PAT-enabled) hosts that are sending and receiving data across the internet.
     
    Certifications: A+
    WIP: Network+ , Security+

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