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Do you have to work your notice?

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by Boycie, Oct 27, 2005.

  1. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    I had an interview today that went well i feel. :)

    It is for general IT support for a local company with around 20 staff.

    The manager sounded keen and wondered if i had to work my months notice.

    I have had a look around the general vibe is that some people don't work their notice but can be "done" for breaking their contract....
     
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  2. wagnerk
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    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    If you signed a contract of employment to say that you have to give a certain amount of notice, then yes. However, if you have any holiday entitlement that can be used this will reduce the amount of notice needed in some companies . Another way around it is if you ask your current employer to waive your notice period, depending on what your job role is the company may release you from your contract as you may pose a "security risk" (I've worked at companies were as soon as you hand in your notice you left then and there, you'd have a paid months "garden leave" - but hey it's down to the company).

    Hoep this helps.
     
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  3. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    I agree. Boyce, it is up to the company and whether they need time to replace you or can't live without your skills for another few weeks. In truth they are unlikely to pursue you in court if you just say goodbye and walk out but personally I would not leave on a sour note. I don't believe in burning bridges.

    The best way is to just ask them if you can reduce your notice as the new company is eager to get you on board.

    Pete
     
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  4. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    yeah, i agree chaps. My current job isn't the best but i don't want it to turn sour :dry

    Should i be offered the place i'll talk to my current manager
     
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  5. drum_dude

    drum_dude Gigabyte Poster

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    Yes do that Boyce, they may waiver it as it's your first break into IT...who would want to screw that up for you!!!

    Good luck mate!!!!
     
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  6. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    What the heck is "work your notice?" :blink
     
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  7. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    I guess I look at this a little different than most people. To me it's not a question of "will I make someone mad at me if I don't keep my word", but "do I respect myself enough to do what I say I'll do". Is my word worth anything to me? Will I give it and then back out? I don't want to look at myself in the mirror in the morning and know that I'm looking at someone who didn't keep their word. I don't like it when someone gives me their word and doesn't keep it, so will I do the same thing and then not respect myself? That's what is important to me.
     
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  8. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Ok. I think I get it. It's important to me to do a good job...not because the other workers are or aren't going a good job and not because the boss is looking over my shoulder. It's important to me because at least in some ways, how I do my job defines me. I know, it's a typical male attitude...but this is how I support my family.

    I once had a kid tell me that he wished he had a family and people who depended on him. He thought that maybe that would give him the motivation to do what he knew he should do.

    There were plenty of times when I was young that I skrewed off and failed to meet expectations. I regret those times but feel I've learned from them. I can see it in my children...a certain lack of commitment. I'm convinced that no matter how hard you try...you can't teach that attitude to youngsters...they have to negotiate it for themselves. It's one of the rites of passage into adulthood.

    Sadly...not everyone makes it.
     
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  9. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Trip, in the UK most companies have a clause in their contract of employment that covers a notice period.

    Basically it is a double edged sword, the employer states that he will give say one months notice. This means they will let you know, a month in advance if they are going to let you go for whatever reason. If that reason is not consistent with still working there, they will let you go immediately but pay you a months salary in lieu of notice.

    It works in a similar fashion from the employees perspective. If you are going to leave, an employee hands in their notice. They basically inform their company that they are resigning from the post and their leaving date will be in a months time. This gives the employer a four week period where they can advertise and hopefully fill the vacancy without losing productivity.

    It generally works very well but there are times when an employee, in this case Boycie, has an opportunity of starting earlier than the agreed notice period. This is negotiable as long as the employee has been faithful and diligent to the company over the time that he has been employed. Clearly if that is not the case, the company are less likely to be flexible.

    There are certain jobs, sales for example where an employee will almost always be let go immediately (with a months pay in lieu of notice), this is so that the employee is not tempted to steal company information like leads, contacts, customer lists etc.
     
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  10. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Ah. I apologize for my ignorance. In Idaho, an employer can let go an employee without cause on a moment's notice. They don't have to have a reason. You are just gone. It is however customary for an employee to give two week's notice before leaving.
     
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  11. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Bluerinse,

    We have something similar here in the US. Usually, depending on the job though, it's 2 weeks notice. There are employers who will fire people on the spot if they give notice and it doesn't seem to always be related to whether the person is in a position to steal anything either. Some employers are just jerks and it makes them mad that someone is quitting them. These are usually places with high turnover because they treat their employees badly.

    Few employers here will give severance pay--laying a person off immediately and giving them up to a months salary anyway. There are some that do, but it's not too common. I've also heard of some employers who have had catastrophies happen--a manufacturing plant burn down--that have paid their employees for six months or a year until they got going again, but that is very rare. All the ones I have heard of doing this have been owned by individuals. None have been public corporations.
     
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  12. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Cheers Freddy!

    It is interesting to know how things work in other countries, we tend to think the world is the same all over but that isn't the case. Here in Oz things are different again. Mostly I am really impressed with the work ethic of even the lowly employees here. The knowledge that some of the young folk at Bunnings Warehouse have (like B&Q in England) is outstanding. I have spoken for hours with the staff about the intricacies of whipper snippers (strimmers) for example and have walked away with far more knowledge on the subject than I had when I walked in. This *attitude* is common here and I applaud it.
     
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  13. Pete01

    Pete01 Kilobyte Poster

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    Definitely don't burn bridges ever, references are very important!
     
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  14. nugget
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    nugget Junior toady

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    As freddy pointed out above, can you live with yourself when you break your word (and contract)? I know I couldn't and if you think 1 months notice is hard to work with we have a usual 3 month notice period. That's really hard to work through.

    Another point to think about is, if you 'walk' out straight away regardless of the consequences from your employer what kind of message does this give your new employer? It might be good on the surface as you get to start straight away but there will always be that underlying thought that you will eventually do the same to him.
     
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  15. Phoenix
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    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    bear in mind from a legal perspective, during garden leave you are still employed, and working for two companies at once is also a breach of most contracts
     
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  16. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    You do have to work your notice and if you walk out you can technically be taken to court for breaking your contract. This situation is very rare and they would just accept it. The only situation I could see a company taking you to court is if you did specialist work where if you suddenly left the company would lose money or productivity.

    On the otherhand personally I would think twice about walking off due to the fact that if you ever needed a reference from them then you would be screwed. Talk to your manager I would assume that most places would let you go or at least shorten you notice period.
     
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  17. moominboy

    moominboy Gigabyte Poster

    try working a YEARS notice folks!
     
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  18. Phoenix
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    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    a year? who would sign a contract demanding a years notice????
     
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  19. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    thanks for the input guys. :thumbleft
     
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  20. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Moominboy in the army?
     
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